Friday Faceoff –To robbery, butchery and rapine, they give the lying name of ‘government’; they create a desolation and call it peace… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffRomanwarfarecovers

Standard

This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with Roman warfare images. I’ve selected The Eagle of the Ninth – Book 1 of The Dolphin Ring Cycle by Rosemary Sutcliffe.

Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Sept 1993

This edition was produced by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) in September 1993. It has grown on me, as I like the artwork, which is clear and works well in thumbnail. My main grizzle is that eagle standard, which seems to be propped up against the main character’s shoulder in rather a peculiar way. I find it distracting. And I’m not all that keen on the highly stylised font, which says 1920s and 30s, rather than taking me back to Rome.

Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Sept 2011

Published in September 2011 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR), this looks to me to be a cover tie-in to the film. The protagonists look suitably grim and grubby and I like the epic sense of the battle going on in the background, rather than just a few chaps waving shields and pilums around. That is also a wonderfully threatening sky… However, I am disappointed in the choice of font, which blends far too well into the background to effectively stand out or draw the eye.

Oxford University Press, March 2000

This edition, published by Oxford University Press in March 2000, has chosen to focus on the famous legion standard – the golden eagle. It looks fabulous, especially as it has been angled to catch the light and look suitably dramatic. So it’s a crying shame that all that impact and awesomeness is then promptly squandered by cluttering up the cover with that block of unnecessary chatter. WHY couldn’t the bit about the one million copies sold go on the back, under the blurb? This is so nearly my favourite…

Dutch edition, 2003

This Dutch edition, produced by Clavis in 2003, also features the legion’s standard. This design has deliberately chosen to reproduce the sense of the 1950s – this book was first published in 1954 – with the textbox and artwork. While I’m not a fan of textboxes, I respect the care and thought that has gone into this one and it is so very nearly my favourite. I particularly like the red font, which pleasingly picks up the shade of tassels flying from the standard. It’s details like this that make a cover eye-catching.

German edition, 1971

This German edition, published by dtv in 1971, is my choice for this week. I love the vintage feel of the artwork and the clean, uncluttered look. Other than the author and title font, the only other detail is the publisher’s logo – what a lovely change to see the whole of the cover design unimpeded by blobs or chatter! I read this series when I was at school and while this isn’t the same cover as the copy I had – it’s not that different. Which is your favourite?

23 responses »

  1. There are some good choices here, but I think my favorite is the Oxford University Press edition, I like the simplicity and the powerful image of the eagle:-)

  2. I love the Dutch Edition best though the Oxford copy is nice too though I agree they shouldn’t have cluttered it up with all the text. The text on the first one is an odd choice and I think spoiled it a bit.

  3. I like the Oxford University Press cover, and “dramatic” was the exact word when I saw it! I don’t mind the clutter of the lettering too much, I don’t think it had to be so big but the font is at least suitable 😀

  4. That illustrated cover reminds me of the illustrations in my Bible history book, so I agree that I’m leaning towards that one, too! The third one, though, does have a brilliant eagle on it. That gives me the impression it’s intended for a more adult audience.

  5. I like the third cover – and the second (but the font does rather fade into the background). Shame about the incessant chatter on the third – otherwise that’s a lovely cover.
    Lynn 😀

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.