Tag Archives: book covers

Friday Faceoff – The Pen is Mightier than the Sword

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer and is currently hosted by Lynn’s Book Blog. This week the theme is a cover featuring a fancy font, so I’ve chosen Assassin’s Apprentice – Book 1 of The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb.

 

This cover, produced by Spectra in March 1996, is not my favourite, however I still like it. The content is directly applicable to the cover and I particularly like the shadowed stag and birds wheeling in the air. While my preference is not to have the main character featured on the cover – it always jars with my mental image – this depiction isn’t offensively different, other than being rather better fed and groomed than the scrawny, feral character I always imagined Fitz to be.

 

This edition was produced by Voyager in March 1996 and is far less eye-catching. The generic ship in a rough sea could be headed anywhere and the small inset headshots don’t really add very much. I do like the design around the title and author fonts, which are at least an improvement on the usual wretched rectangular blocks plonked in the middle of the artwork. However, the overall greyness wouldn’t encourage me to pluck this one off the shelves.

 

Published in November 2002 by Spectra, edition manages to evoke the sense of magic. The deep blue is attractive and I like the fact that Fitz is stroking a dog while Spymaster Chade has his hand upon the boy’s head in a somewhat threatening manner. The castle in the background emphasises the sense that Fitz isn’t free to come and go as he pleases. Overall, I think this cover works really well and is a close contender.

 

This edition, published in 2011 by Voyager fulfils the brief as far the fancy font is concerned and also happens to be my favourite. Given that Fitz is writing his memoirs throughout this trilogy, I really like the effect that this is an old parchment and the lovely flowing font is both beautiful and eye-catching.

 

This Spanish edition also caught my eye – and this time the fancy font is featuring Robin Hobb’s name, which seems a smart marketing move, given just how famous she is. Published in June 2014 by Plaza & Janés México, I love the layers of action fading into the sky as the boy on horseback trots through the landscape, looking rather lonely. Which one is your favourite?

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Friday Faceoff – In the bleak midwinter…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is a snowscape, so I’ve chosen Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey.

 

This is the cover produced by Reagan Arthur Books in February 2012 and frankly, I don’t know what they were thinking. It is pretty enough – indeed, looks appropriate for a cute childen’s tale. But this book is nothing of the sort – it is a wonderful portrait of survival in a hostile environment, of despair and gritted determination and a miracle. Or is it? So this cover is completely inappropriate.

 

This edition, produced by Headline Review in February 2012 is more like it. I love the simplicity of the deep blue with the outline of the girl and the fox in white. It is eye-catching and gives a far better sense of the book. While it isn’t my favourite, it is certainly a huge improvement on the previous effort.

 

Published in July 2012 by Polirom, this Romanian cover is an unfortunate throwback to the first cover. It looks far too juvenile for this remarkable book which covers very adult themes, even if the prose is at times ethereally beautiful.

 

Thank goodness this cover, produced in September 2014 by Tinder Press, is a much better effort. The snowscape is still beautiful. I love the looping font the footsteps leading away from it towards the smudge in the trees that may or may not be the child. Lovely and entirely in keeping with the content.

 

However my favourite is this Serbian edition by Laguna, published in January 2013. I love the cool blue of the cover and the delicacy and detail of the frosting around the edge of the cover – how beautiful! And it isn’t the snow child portrayed on the cover, it is the heavier figure of the woman, searching for her… As you may have gathered, I’ve become a tad overwrought about these covers – but which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Snap!

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is a mirror image or reflection, so I’ve chosen The Dark Mirror – Book 1 of The Bridei Chronicles by Juliet Marillier.

 

This cover, produced by Tor Books in June 2006, is my least favourite. While the hint of a reflection and the gnarled tree behind the seated girl does give a sense of the otherworldly tone that pervades this outstanding historical fantasy series, it doesn’t do it justice. I also think the lettering is clunky and unsuited to the genre and content.

 

This edition was produced by Tor books in March 2006 and is far more appropriate. The lone tree, reflected in the water in a wild landscape beautifully evokes the mood of the book and would immediately have me wanting to pick it up. This one is my favourite.

 

Published in 2007 by Bertrand Editora, this Portuguese edition has also manages to capture the magical sense of the book, though I’m not quite sure what that fraying piece of lace at the top is all about… But those brooding trees reflected in the lake are very effective.

 

This Australian edition, published in November 2007 by Pan Australia, is also effective and haunting. I particularly like the title font, which fits the period without being too fussy or taking away from that stunning landscape – this is a very close second for me. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Zip it, lock it and throw away the key

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is keys, so I’ve chosen Keeper of the Keys – Book 2 of The Cycle of Fire series by Janny Wurts.

 

This cover, produced by Grafton in 1990 is really eye-catching with the limited colour palette of blues. The glowing key illuminating the face from below gives an otherworld, ethereal cast to the character and while I don’t much like chatter on the front cover – at least the endorsement isn’t too intrusive. This is my favourite.

 

This edition was produced by Ace in August 1988 and is far more dramatic. The protagonist is clearly in a desperate situation. I really like the unfolding drama with the sinister figure looming over the hapless lad. My problem with this cover is that the beautifully painted eagle somehow gets lost amongst the large golden lettering. Why on earth didn’t they choose another colour for the title font?

 

Published in October 1995 by HarperPrism, this is another beautiful detailed, action-packed cover. This time, the protagonist (he does get about, doesn’t he?) is hanging off the hull of a boat, moodily clutching the key around his neck as he gazes out across the seascape. I also thoroughly enjoy this one – but the eerily lit face just edges it. Which one is your favourite?

My 1,500th post… Friday Faceoff – Much as I love you, I cannot permit you to maul this particular coat…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is the Regency era, so I’ve chosen Frederica by Georgette Heyer.

 

This is the cover produced by Arrow in August 1992. It is a charming cover with a strong period feel with also an appropriate font, while it isn’t my favourite cover I do like it very much.

 

This edition was produced by Sourcebooks Casablanca in January 2009. This is another eye-catching cover. I like the sense of movement and the colours. But the pink band through the cover is simply awful. It sticks out like a… pink band and jars with the rest of the cover design and mood.

 

Published in February 2011 by Cornerstone Digital, I love this one. The cover design is simple yet striking and the black and green against the black is both attractive and distinctive. The period feel is successful evoked by the chandelier and the dresses of the girls. This is my favourite.

 

Produced in 1965 by The Bodley Head, this is the original hardback edition. Again, I think this is a charming, effective cover that relates directly to the content. The only grumble I have is that rather ugly black text box, but at least it is reasonably small and the font is attractive.

 

This edition, published in December 1973, is the one I managed to pick up secondhand a lifetime ago when I already knew I enjoyed reading Heyer’s books as light relief from my schoolwork. I still think it’s a good cover and love the golden glow that bathes the scene and is a close contender. Which is your favourite?

And today’s post happens to be my 1,500th. Thank you everyone, who has taken the time to read, like or comment any of my posts. It has been a joy to meet up with so many lovely folks from around the world – I find it miraculous that I can chat about my favourite books with someone from the US. Happy blogging!

Friday Faceoff – These mist covered mountains…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is couples, so I’ve chosen Brothers in Arms – Book 5 of the Miles Vorkosigan series by Lois McMaster Bujold.

 

This is the cover produced by Baen Book in November 2001. I like the pulp feel that is Baen’s trademark and I think this is one of their best offerings. The figures reclining in the middle of the cover relate directly to the content inside, as does the disembodied faces. I also really like the title font and the manner in which the author’s name is also featured – nifty and elegantly done. If I could change anything, I’d do away with the chatter, but you can’t have everything.

 

And this is what Baen came up with in January 2008. Oh dear. What a sad, lacklustre affair when compared with the quirky excellence of seven years earlier… The figures are poorly detailed and that polka-dotted background doesn’t even convince as a starscape!

 

This is more like it! Published in January 2007 by Blackstone Audiobooks, I really like the detail of the cockpit here, with the reflection of the pilot looking out towards the approaching planet. This gives the sense of the action and drama that this book brims with in an attractive, evocative setting. This is my favourite.

 

Produced in October 1996 by Wilhelm Heyne Verlag, this German edition is very simple. The cover is clearly a play on the title and a reference to Miles’ two identities. It is very simple and the rather washed-out skyscape gives a sense of the genre, but is surprisingly effective. I’d certainly pick it up to have another look, although I don’t like the depiction of Miles – I think he looks cruel.

 

This edition, published in August 2008 by Nesta Press, once more gives us a slice of the action. I like the artwork and the drama, while the blues and greys work well to draw the eye and encourage me to take another look. Again, this is a deliberate attempt to hark back to the pulp editions of early science fiction novels and successfully informs the browsing reader of the genre. Which is your favourite?

 

ANNDDD…

 

Steph at Earthian Hivemind interviews me about my writing and my debut novel…

Friday Faceoff – Me and my shadow…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is the one we prefer. This week the theme is shadows, so I’ve chosen A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.

 

This cover, produced by Walker Books in September 2011 is the one with the shadow. The dark figure striding across the newly ploughed field towards the house is certainly creepy – and initially I’d thought this was a horror book. But of course, it’s a lot more complicated than that. And the monster isn’t what you expect. I love this cover, but I do think it gives the wrong impression about the book.

 

This offering was produced by Candlewick in August 2016 and is one of the movie tie-in covers. That said, it is both beautiful and moving – I just wish they hadn’t seen fit to smother so much of it with details of the wretched film. I love the colours and the fingertips showing at the top of the cover as the boy sleeps.

 

This cover from Walker Books was published in May 2015. It’s okay, I suppose. But I find it rather generic with the tree branches and the moon shining through them. I’m not quite sure exactly why, except that the monster tends to visit Connor at night.

 

Produced in August 2011, this German edition by CBJ is haunting with the silhouette of the boy standing in front of the gravestones at the foot of the tree. The detail is beautiful – clever use of the foliage that looks like the profile of the monster. I really like this one – it’s my favourite. It’s beautiful and eye-catching, while still being relevant to the content.

 

This edition, published in October 2016 by Walker Books is another movie tie-in. Despite the sharpness of the illustration and beautiful colour of the sky, I think it is a poor imitation of the previous, more atmospheric German cover. And again, there is far too much chatter about the film plastered across it. Which one of these do you prefer?

 

 

AAAND… today the blog tour for Running Out of Space is being hosted by Crazy Beautiful Books.

Friday Faceoff – You have nice manners for a thief, and a LIAR!

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is the one we prefer. This week the theme is dragons, so I’ve chosen Tooth and Claw by Jo Walton.

 

This cover, produced by Tor Fantasy in December 2004, is a rather splendid dragon. Definitely eye-catching and I like the fact that he is clearly expecting to be served. If I’m going to be picky, the backdrop looks like a generic fantasy landscape – and this book is set in an alternate Victorian England where dragons are vying with each other for power and influence after the style of Trollop. So the backdrop doesn’t line up very well with the content. Other than that, I think it’s a solidly good cover.

 

This offering was produced by Orb Books in January 2006. I have to say my first instinct is ‘how boring’. A WHITE cover… really? And that very generic dragon didn’t really take a lot of effort. There’s nothing innately wrong with it, but when I consider just what an awesomely sharp, funny and memorable book this is – the cover simply doesn’t measure up.

 

This cover from Corsair was published in February 2013 and is far more like it! The deep rich crimson and embossed gold lettering and wheeling dragon is both classy and eyecatching. This is the edition that I read, so that also may affect my reaction to it – but the reason I picked it up off the shelf was because the cover caught my eye…

 

Produced in September 2017, this French edition by Denoël also features gold lettering and decoration. The background is darker, but I suppose they are going for a classic Victorian feel. I also like the visual impact of this one, though I doubt it gives the reader much idea about the story or genre of this very quirky, entertaining book.

 

This edition, published in 2006 by Triton is my favourite. I love the wonderfully detailed illustration. The power and menace emanating from that dragon is palpable, while the lettering looks beautiful. And the fact this dragon is engrossed in a book gives a major clue about the story. What about you? Which one of these do you prefer?

 

AAAND… some of you may know that my debut novel, Running Out of Space was published this week. Today I am featuring in a guest blog at Second Run Reviews talking about growing up during the space race – and how I felt when it all came to a halt.

Friday Faceoff – Checkmate

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is the one we prefer. This week the theme is black and white covers, so I’ve chosen Blackout – Book 1 of the All Clear series by Connie Willis.

 

This cover produced by Spectra Books in February 2010 is the original. I love the way we get small bubbles of action in amongst the shifting dark pattern – an attractive design that nicely echoes the content of this time-travelling adventure. This one is my favourite.

 

This offering was produced by Gollancz in June 2011 and is another strong contender. The cloud revealing the London skyline from the surrounding black cover is another strong, simple design that is both eye-catching and effective.

 

This French edition was published by J’ai lu in March 2014. The iconic view of Westminster surrounded by smoke smearing the sky would certainly make me look again and though I’m not a fan of solid blocks of colour as a backdrop for the title and author, this time the blue works very well.

 

Produced in September 2010 by Allen and Unwin, this Kindle edition is another successful effort. The greyscale shading works well as the girl is unmistakeably from the late 1930s/early 1940s. The red tinge near the top of the cover just behind the ruin gives a slight sense of menace – and a big clue as to the setting of the book.

 

Published in February 2010 by Spectra Books, this hardback edition is the most generic of the covers and my least favourite. It has clearly been taken from a photograph of the time and I think the overall design is further weakened by a rather limp title font. Which cover do you like best – and which is your least favourite?

 

Friday Faceoff – Everybody’s got haters, but your city’s always behind you.

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is cities, so I’ve chosen Zoo City by Lauren Buekes.

This cover, produced by Angry Robot in April 2010, is the original. It manages to successfully depict the main characters along with their animals. I really like this one – it is colourful, eye-catching and true to the book.

 

This amazing cover is on the book that I own. I love it – the apparently simple idea of having the font carry all the elements of the story in a striking black and white design just looks so cool. This is my favourite offering and was produced by Angry Robot in August 2010.

 

This Hungarian edition was published by Ad Astra in April 2012. It is another strong contender – I love the way Zinzi is gazing out at us with her animal on her back. The colourful backdrop also works very well.

 

Produced in 2011 by Центрполиграф, this Russian cover is another very strong design with all sorts of interesting allusions to what happens in the book. It also has a more futuristic feel which I also enjoyed.

 

Published in August 2016 by Mulholland Books, this is by far the most minimal of the covers – and my least favourite. While the lipsticked teeth may serve as a crude warning about the danger Zinzi experiences, there is very little clue as to what this book is about. Which one is your favourite?