Tag Archives: book covers

Friday Faceoff – No soldier outlives a thousand chances…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is soldiers, so I’ve chosen Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein.

 

This is the cover produced by Ace in 1987. I really like the overall bright yellow/orange colour and the no-nonsense font. It’s a long time ago since I read this one, but I don’t recall that space ships roaring into the action was much of a thing. My recollection is that they are all about the bloody hand to hand combat with the insectoid aliens, but it does make for a dramatic cover.

 

This paperback edition by Ace, produced in May 1987 is far more in tune with the content, given it features a trooper in one of those awesome suits. They also have recreated Heinlein’s signature for some reason that escapes me, which rather spoils the balance and impact of the cover.

 

Published in July 1982 by Berkley, this is another cover featuring a trooper wearing one of these amazing suits – although this version manages to look rather alien. Even with the fame of this book, the publishers still decided the author’s name would sell more copies by emblazoning it across the top third of cover, rather than the title.

 

Produced in August 1997 by New English Library, this cover is clearly in response to the recently released film. These covers aren’t usually my favourites, but I really like this one – there is real sense of battle going on and I also think the styling of the title font is eye-catching and attractive.

 

This is another Berkley cover, this edition published in November 1977. The vivid turquoise and font, along with the artwork give this cover a retro feel. I want to like this one, but I don’t. The aliens look far too static to be the terrible threat described in the book and that harsh colour puts me in mind of 1950s bathroom suites… Which one do you like best?

Friday Faceoff – Love is friendship set on fire…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is fire, so I’ve chosen Burned – Book 7 of the Alex Verus series by Benedict Jacka.

 

This is the cover produced by Ace in April 2016 is certainly eye-catching. I love the view of the Shard from across the Thames bathed in the beautiful patterns of yellow, orange and red in an artist’s impression of fire. The darker cloud of sooty smooth behind the title font is both simple and effective. This is my favourite cover.

 

This UK offering, produced by Orbit in April 2016 is also well crafted and beautiful. The map of London is superimposed upon a red flame licking up the cover. However, I do find the blurb bang in the middle of the cover detracts from the drama and complexity of artwork.

 

Published in April 2016 by Tantor Audible, this cover is another compelling effort with the far more realistic flames engulfing the London cityscape with the Thames in the foreground. However, I think the title font is plain to the point of disappointing. What do you think and which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Any planet is ‘Earth’ to those who live on it…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is planets, so I’ve chosen The Empress of Mars by the wonderfully talented Kage Baker.

 

This is the cover produced by Tor in May 2009. I like this one – the depiction of the half-terraformed planet is vividly portrayed without any undue clutter or blurb, which makes this one very effective.

 

This Italian edition, produced in October 2007 by Delos Books is more static with the red desert landscape featuring, rather than showing any of the feisty characters that ping off the page. I don’t feel this cover does the book justice, but neither is it an egregious travesty either.

 

Published in December 2008 by Subterranean Press, this cover is less about the Mars environment and more about the characters. It tends to have a sense of fantasy about it, which isn’t quite right. That said, it is eye-catching and effective and anything that encourages a reader to pick one of Baker’s books off the shelf is to be encouraged.

 

This cover, produced by in 2003 by Night Shade Books, once again features a Martian landscape. This depiction certainly looks very like a lot of the images we have seen of Mars, especially the pink-tinged sky and rather foreshortened horizon. I particularly like the font on this one. As for my favourite? This week I simply cannot decide. What about you – do you have a preference?

Friday Faceoff – I must go down to the sea again…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is ships, so I’ve chosen Ship of Magic – Book 1 of the Liveship Traders series by Robin Hobb.

 

This is the cover produced by Voyager in 1999. I like this one – it has the now-familiar design of all Hobb’s UK covers, with the attractive font and styling. The ship’s bow gives a sense of movement with the dragonwing in the foreground giving a hint of something else going on. The detail and artwork is nicely done.

 

This edition, produced in February 1999 by Spectra features the protagonist, Althea in the foreground. While I normally am not a fan of characters appearing on covers, as it is rarely how I envisage them, the depiction here works well. This is another eye-catching, attractive cover.

 

Published in 2008 by HarperVoyager, this is my least favourite cover. I suppose it was a 10th anniversary edition – but there is no sense of magic or excitement about this design. It looks like the sort of drawing you might find on a copy of an 18th century sailing manual, rather than a tale of piracy and oppression.

 

This is the offering Spectra came up with in December 2003 – and once again, bristles with energy and danger as this time around, it is the pirate Kennit who features in the foreground. The desperate liveship, Vivacia, also featured plunging through the waves. Another great cover.

 

This cover, produced by Plaza Janés in July 2015, is my favourite. I love the dark background, giving a sense of menace and the wonderfully dramatic font and loops across the top of the book. And this ship truly looks as if it could be magical and driven to madness… But which one do you prefer?

Friday Faceoff – All that is gold does not glitter…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is gold, so I’ve chosen Making Money – Book 36 of the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett.

 

This is the cover produced by Harper in September 2007. I look at it and recall the early wonderful, busy Discworld covers of Josh Kirby with a sigh of nostalgia. Oh well. Having said that, there is a sense of energy in the shower of money being scooped up by the top hat. I also like the hatching in the background, which gives a sense of depth to a fairly simple image.

 

This edition, produced in June 2008 by Corgi, is the cover of the book that I owned. I find the black background a bit grim, but I do like the image of the main protagonist, Moist von Lipwig. He is the epitome of a money-making capitalist. It is a testament to Pratchett’s success that his name is featured with the same size and impact normally reserved for the title.

 

Published in February 2014 by Transworld, this is another gloomy offering with a single spotlight on the pile of gold. Given that this is Discworld novel with a fair degree of humour, I find the gloom prevailing surprising.

 

This cover, produced by Pocket in February 2016, is my favourite. I very much like the background of the large, slightly distorted bank as he scampers down the front steps with money fluttering in his wake. There is a real sense of gleeful mischief depicted on this French cover missing from the others. But which one do you prefer?

Friday Faceoff – I collect hats. That’s what you do when you’re bald. (James Taylor)

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is hats, so I’ve taken the idea of hats into space by choosing The Martian by Andy Weir – see my review. After all, he is wearing his helmet on his head – it must count as a type of hat…

 

This is my personal favourite. I love the drama of the swirling red dust as poor old Mark is being swept away and think this is the cover that most effectively depicts the initial drama the starts the book. It was produced in February 2014 by Crown.

 

This edition, produced in February 2014 by Edbury Digital is produced as a movie tie-in cover. So it is Matt Damon suffering on the cover, with flashes of the faceplate hinting at the helmet as he considers his plight after being stranded on Mars. Again, the colour of the cover and his agonised expression captures the drama of the situation.

 

Published in February 2014 by Broadway Books, this is the ‘arrested’ version – we all have them. The photo of us that looks like it’s been taken at a police station after we’ve done something naughty… I’m quite comforted to see that even film stars endure such pics, as I thought it was only one’s children who specialised in taking these efforts. Suffice to say this isn’t a cover that would persuade me to rush out and buy this book.

 

This cover, produced by Autopublished in September 2012, is clearly a DIY effort. Having said that, I’ve seen worse – the biggest criticism of it being that it is very generic. However, that clearly didn’t stop people buying this book in droves, as it subsequently attracted a publishing deal based on its popularity.

 

This Russian cover is another strong contender. I like the drama and fact it depicts the full horror of Mark’s situation. Produced by ACT in September 2014, I like the fact we are seeing exactly what Mark sees – although I’m not sure there are quite so many clouds in a Martian sky. Which cover do you like best?

Friday Faceoff – In ancient times cats were worshipped as gods…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is cats, so I’ve chosen Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats – by T.S. Eliot.

 

This is playful cover is more than a nod to some of the earlier covers with the cartoon-like cats and cheerful colour – so much more fun than some of the other drearier offerings in the 1960s and 70s. It was produced in August 1982 by Harcourt Brace and Co., which sounds like the sort of publisher that would crop up in one of Eliot’s poems… I really like this one.

 

This edition, produced in October 2009 by HMH, is another really enjoyable cover with a number of the recognisable cats that feature in Eliot’s delightful poems. As well as being quirky and playful, this cover is attractive and eye-catching.

 

Published in 2001 by Faber and Faber, this cover continues with the bright background and cartoon cats. However, I think the whole design is spoilt by that ugly block running across the bottom of the cover for the title and author – and by 2001, they didn’t have the excuse that it was still the fashion that prevailed with covers.

 

This cover, produced by Faber and Faber in February 2014, is another strong contender. I like the madcap cat featuring behind the footlights – along with the distinctive font on the word CATS, this is more than a nod to the worldwide hit musical that came out of this collection of poems.

 

This is my favourite cover – mostly because I find it the most appealing and attractive, rather than because I think it is necessarily the best design. Produced by Faber and Faber in October 2010, I love the bright colourful design of the cats high-kicking their way across the rooftop. It may lack the quirkiness of some of the other covers, but the bold colours and well balanced title font sells this one for me. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – My guitar is not a thing. It is an extension of myself. (Joan Jet)

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is guitars, so I’ve chosen Soul Music – Book 16 of the Discworld series by the late, great Terry Pratchett.

 

This is the go-to cover, as far as I’m concerned. Produced in September 1995 by Corgi, it is certainly the cover of my copy of Soul Music – funny, anarchic and brimful of movement and madcap detail, but with more than a hint of darkness. While I’m not a fan of solid panels of colour for the title and author name, this probably just about manages to get by without messing up the artwork too much.

 

 

This edition, produced in May 2003 by HarperTorch starts off well enough. I rather like the quirky font and eye-catching red background. I’m a tad more dubious about the record, but the depiction of Susan is when the cover becomes unacceptably inaccurate. Since when did Terry write her as some curvy bimbette who pouts at us over her shoulder?

 

 

Published in October 2009, this is okay, I suppose. I find the background and title font flat and uninspiring, while the skeleton guitar is too small and strangely unappealing. The only part of the cover that really works are those blue-edged notes which are the only clue we get about the fun and energy within the book.

 

 

This cover, produced by Gollancz in December 2013, is the only one that comes close to the original in effectively depicting the fun and quirkiness of the story. I love the sweeping lines and the clever addition of the title and flowing author signature. However, why, why, why are the colours so dreary? This is a story full of zest about what transformative magic is to be had in music – gloomy shades of brown with the occasional tasteful orange accent simply doesn’t reflect the verve of the content.

 

 

This dreary, generic effort was produced by Corgi in October 2005 – what a difference a decade makes! Given they also used that wonderful original cover, I’m wondering if in the interim to save a couple of quid they got rid of their cover design department and instead asked someone’s younger brother if he could rustle something up using Shutterstock for a bit of pocket money – it certainly looks like it. Which is your favourite?  Do you agree with my choice – or my rather grumpy opinion of the rest of the covers?

Friday Faceoff – It shuffles through the dry, dusty darkness…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is mummification,, so I’ve chosen The Osiris Ritual – Book 2 of the Newbury and Hobbs seriesby George Mann – see my review here.

 

This gorgeous cover, produced by Snow Books in September 2009, is my favourite. I love the colours, the vivid colouring and beautiful, apt detail. The balance of information against that eye-catching design is perfect – in short this is one of my all-time favourite covers and is certainly the best of this selection.

 

This edition, produced in August 2010 by Tor Books is also a great effort. The giant sphinx and dark, muted colours certainly give a sense of the threat and catch the eye. I also like the title and author fonts, but it does lack the wonderful detail and flair of the previous cover.

 

Published in February 2012 by Piper, this is yet another strong offering, with plenty going on that is particularly applicable to the content. I like the steampunk cogs decorating the frame – enjoyable as well as informative – while the bridge disappearing off into the distant London landscape works well, given what the Osiris ritual is all about.

 

This cover, produced by Titan Books in November 2015, is another effective effort. The gold immediately sings out, drawing the eye and definitely setting it apart on the shelf – and again, I appreciate the icon that lets the reader know this is steampunk. It also sports the Newbury and Hobbes label – appropriate as this detective duo set in a steampunk version of Victorian London now has a solid fan following.

 

This edition was produced by Fahrenheitbooks in November 2014. This is the weakest effort, with a generic image that I don’t think works all that well with the font. Having said that, you would certainly notice it on a bookshelf. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is the moon, so I’ve chosen A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke.

 

This cover, produced by Gollancz in March 2002, evokes the era of when this classic was written back in 1961. I like the period feel and sense of drama, with the spaceman presumably going for help or rescue and the half-buried ship in the background. Great stuff!

 

This edition, produced in March 1971 by Signet, takes us right to the heart of the book – nothing generic here. We have the rather mountainous moonscape with the ship evidently trapped in the fine regolith and outcrop featuring in the foreground. Or is it the dust-covered corpse of a long-dead spaceman? I love the balance and dramatic contrast between the bright moon and dark sky. Despite the poor resolution, this is my favourite.

 

Published by Pan in 1969, this offering is far more generalised with a spaceship cruising through space. That said, the detailed artwork on the ship is beautiful and the spacescape is well done. I don’t like this one as much as the others, though.

 

This cover, produced by Spectra Arpil 1991, is also another effective, eye-catching cover. This one depicts the colony on the moon and a ship setting off – it may well be the one about to get into trouble. What particularly sets this one apart is the striking font. Inevitably on most of the covers, Clarke’s name is in the larger, brighter font as an established author with a strong fan following.

 

This edition was produced by Rosetta Books in November 2012. This is the cover I’ve been most conflicted about. Initially, I rolled my eyes and thought, somewhat huffily, that it was another lacklustre effort for the Kindle market. But… it absolutely nails the plot. A ship stranded in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by an ocean of lethal dust with the dark skies above. I also like the nifty handling of the font and author. The more I look at this one, the more I like it. Which one do you like best?