Tag Archives: fae

Review of INDIE Ebook The Violent Fae – Book 3 of The Ordshaw series by Phil Williams #Brainfluffbookreview #TheViolentFaebookreview

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I have read and enjoyed the first two books in this entertaining series, see my reviews of Under Ordshaw and Blue Angel. So when I learnt the third book in the series was being released, I was looking forward to continuing the adventure.

BLURB: They hid among us, until she exposed them. They’ll destroy everything to be hidden again. Pax is discovering that the smallest mistakes can have the deadliest impact. To protect her city, she’s uncovered monstrous truths and involved terrible people. The consequences are coming for her. The Sunken City is unstable. The Fae are armed for war. Can Pax stop the coming disaster?

Firstly, if you haven’t yet had the pleasure of reading at least one of the previous books, then my firm advice is to put this one back on the shelf and go and track down Under Ordshaw. This one hits the ground running and we are in the middle of a complicated situation within an urban fantasy landscape that is both layered and nuanced. You certainly won’t get an appreciation of the stakes involved if you try crashing midway into this series.

That said, it’s hard to overstate the hurdles facing both Pax and the fairy Letty. It looks as though those running the human and Fae factions are determined to lock horns over what is going on in the Sunken City and neither seem in the mood to listen to anyone else.

Due to the complicated scenario, this book does take a bit of time to get going. However, when it picks up the pace and we are back in the swing of the story, I was once again swept along with this cast of quirky and original characters. I enjoyed the fact that both Pax and Letty took centre stage in this slice of the adventure, along with Sam Ward and the man I loved to hate in the first book, Cano…

While there is a lot of action in this original urban fantasy series, I also like the fact that Management is clearly at a loss to know what to do in the face of all the paranormal events and once they are aware of how badly they have misread the situation, send in a colourful character as a fixer. I enjoyed that dynamic as it had a real ring of authenticity about it. I also like the fact that one of the characters who I loathed in the first book has had his come-uppance – to the extent that I genuinely felt quite sorry for him. Williams ably negotiates these nuances so that while his cast of characters ping off the page with their vivid eccentricity, they are also capable of change and growth.

Inevitably, I am not going to be able to say much about the plot, as this is the third book in the series, but what I will say is that the overall narrative arc is satisfactorily tied up and I felt happy with the way all the characters completed this particular journey. However, I am very much hoping that this series will continue as it is peopled by too many fascinating characters with intriguing relationships. I definitely want to know what happens to them next.

Highly recommended for fans of urban fantasy with a difference.
9/10

Review of LIBRARY book Sparrow Falling – Book 2 of the Gears of Empire series by Gaie Sebold #Brainfluffbookreview #LoveYourLibrarychallenge #SciFiMonth2019

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I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this series Shanghai Sparrow – see my review here – so when I spotted this one on the shelves, it was a no-brainer that I’d scoop it up. I am linking this review to SciFiMonth2019.

BLURB: Eveline Sparrow hopes to put her past experiences as a thief and con-artist to more legitimate use; which is why some of the girls at her Sparrow School receive private lessons in burglary, fakery, and other such underhand practices. But it’s hard to get honest work when few businesses will employ young ladies in the security professions. The duns are at the doorstep, her friend Liu the half-fox-spirit is in some sort of trouble, and the rivalries of the Folk are in danger of overspilling into the mundane world and forcing the Empire into a bloody and horrifying war. Can Eveline pull things out of the mire this time, or will the Sparrow’s wings be clipped once and for all?

Once I got into this entertaining steam punk adventure, I thoroughly enjoyed it. Evvie is a sympathetic protagonist, although I didn’t immediately reconnect with her as there didn’t seem to be a major bonding moment in the early stages of the novel. A strength of this series is the quality and depth of the supporting characters who are also depicted alongside Evvie Sparrow. One of my favourites is Ma Pether, the Fagin -like character who had scooped up Evvie off the streets and trained her to be a pickpocket and thief.

The other major character who I have more than a soft spot for is Liu, the half-Fae trickster who travels between the Fae courts and the human world in an attempt to impress his father. And save his own life… The two parallel narratives running alongside one another that power the narrative arc are equally engrossing, so I was never tempted to skim one in order to get back to the other. While it took some time for the book to hit its stride, once both storylines got going this was difficult to put down, and I thoroughly enjoyed the manner in which the resolution came about.

It is always a treat to think you know where a story is going, only to find it shoots off in another direction. I am hoping that Sebold is busy writing an addition to this entertaining series – surely Evvie’s talent for finding trouble has not yet been exhausted and I want more of Ma and Liu as well.

Recommended for fans of well-written steam punk.
8/10

Sunday Post – 24th November, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Another funfilled week. Himself’s shoulder injury is apparently an issue with his neck and while he is coping better, it’s because he now is now taking three different types of painkiller. I’ve still been battling on and off with this wretched headache, which I think is a mixture of stress and lack of sleep. And then on Tuesday I broke a tooth. I’ve a delightful visit with the dentist ahead of me, involving lots of tooth-drilling while gazing up his nose, and then handing across an eye-watering amount of money at the end of it. And that’s all going to happen in early December on my mother’s birthday.

One chink of light in all this November murk – will it EVER stop raining??? – is that my sister now is in the process of moving into her new home. I spent yesterday morning with her, helping to hang curtains and put up a shower rail. The other chink is that in the middle of all this misery, I’ve managed to dive back into Mantivore Warrior – to be honest, writing about the struggles of my young hero while MindLinked to a rather grumpy alien is something of a relief…

Last week I read:

Aurora by Kim Stanley Robinson
Our voyage from Earth began generations ago. Now, we approach our new home.
AURORA.
This was a really intriguing read about a generational ship finally approaching its destination after a long, long time in space… Review to follow.

 

 

AUDIOBOOK – Poirot’s Finest Cases: Eight Full-Cast BBC Radio Dramatisations adapted from the books of Agatha Christie
This included Murder on the Orient Express, The ABC Murders and my favourite – The Mysterious Affair at Styles.
All these stories were given the full Radio 4 treatment, including a stellar cast of the great and good of British acting at the time and were well worth the cost of a single credit. Review to follow.

 

 

The Violent Fae – Book 3 of The Ordshaw series by Phil Williams
They hid among us, until she exposed them. They’ll destroy everything to be hidden again.
Pax is discovering that the smallest mistakes can have the deadliest impact. To protect her city, she’s uncovered monstrous truths and involved terrible people. The consequences are coming for her. The Sunken City is unstable. The Fae are armed for war. Can Pax stop the coming disaster?
I’ve read and enjoyed the previous two books in this quirky urban fantasy series – see my review of Under Ordshaw – so was keen to find out how it all gets sorted out. Review to follow.

 

My posts last week:

Review of Cleon Moon – Book 5 of The Fallen Empire series by Lindsay Buroker

Friday Faceoff featuring Use of Weapons – Book 3 of the Culture series by Iain M. Banks

Review of New Star Rising – Book 1 of the Indigo Reports by Cameron Cooper

Review of Castaway Planet – Book 4 of the Boundary series by Eric Flint and Ryk E. Spoor

Teaser Tuesday featuring Aurora by Kim Stanley Robinson

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of The Secret Library – Book 6 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

Sunday Post 17th November 2019

 

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Happy Friday! #ThePositivityWave #13 https://carlalovestoread.wordpress.com/2019/11/22/happy-friday-thepositivitywave-13-november-22/ Carla explains how she and her wonderful family turned what could have been a devastating anniversary into a celebration…

Travel Back in Time – Thanksgiving 1963 (excerpt from DOG BONE SOUP by Bette A. Stevens) https://4writersandreaders.com/2019/11/21/thanksgiving-1963-excerpt-from-dog-bone-soup/ This lovely extract is both poignant and funny and so I thought I’d share it with you.

The Guilty Reader Tag #Bookblogger #Bookbloggers #Bookblog #Blogger #Bloggers https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress.com/2019/11/20/the-guilty-reader-book-tag-bookblogger-bookbloggers-bookblog-blogger-bloggers/ Drew addresses these searching questions, designed to test his blogging rectitude with his customary seriousness—nah – who am I kidding? It’s a hoot…

Sci Fi Month 2019: THE BORDERS OF INFINITY by Lois McMaster Bujold #SciFiMonth https://spaceandsorcery.wordpress.com/2019/11/19/sci-fi-month-2019-the-borders-of-infinity-by-lois-mcmaster-bujold/ Sci Fi Month is in full swing and going brilliantly – and one of the highlights for me is the series of reviews written by Maddalena on the classic Vorkosigan Saga. Science fiction at its best really is allll about the characters – and what a character Miles Vorkosigan turns out to be!

Wordless Wednesday: Lillian https://applegategenealogy.wordpress.com/2019/11/20/wordless-wednesday-lillian/ I keep thinking about this photo. That smile is so wonderfully radiant – I hope she had a happy life…

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week.

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Secret Chapter – Book 6 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman #Brainfluffbookreview #TheSecretChapterbookreview

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I was delighted to be approved to read an arc of this latest slice in Irene’s adventures – see my review of the first book, The Invisible Library. The catch was that I needed to read the previous two books, The Lost Plot and The Mortal Word in something of a hurry so that I got to it in the right order. It turned out to be a blessing – everyday life last week was rather fraught with family illness and these quirky, well-written adventures where just what I needed as an escape. Would The Secret Chapter prove to be as entertaining?

BLURB: A Librarian’s work is never done, and once Irene has a quick rest after their latest adventure, she is summoned to the Library. The world where she grew up is in danger of veering deep into chaos, and she needs to obtain a particular book to stop this from happening. No copies of the book are available in the Library, so her only choice is to contact a mysterious Fae information broker and trader of rare objects: Mr. Nemo. Irene and Kai make their way to Mr. Nemo’s remote Caribbean island and are invited to dinner, which includes unlikely company. Mr. Nemo has an offer for everyone there: he wants them to steal a specific painting from a specific world. He swears that he will give each of them an item from his collection if they bring him the painting within the week.

This latest slice of Irene’s adventures is essentially a heist story. Irene and Kai find themselves having to work alongside a team of rather dodgy characters – something she is far too used to doing. However, this crew are every bit as dangerous as the task they have been set by the shadowy Mr Nemo. I love the way Cogman plays with stereotypes – imagine a James Bond villain, complete with the Caribbean island setting and hungry sharks lurking in a hidden tank beneath their feet.

I am not going into any details as it would be a real shame to spoil this entertaining, twisty story packed with incidents and surprises. Cogman is very adept at creating an action-packed adventure without losing the overall impetus of the story, which is a harder trick to pull off than she makes it look. Once again, we learn more about the closed world of dragon society and just how dangerous they can be when crossed. I love the way in which Cogman reveals extra details about the world in which she has set the Invisible Library with each successive book. It isn’t a new trick, as all good series do the same thing – but she is particularly good at delivering new facts that suddenly change the reader’s perception of what is going on. I love it when that happens.

I ended up reading the last three books in this series back to back, which is something I generally don’t do. And it is a testament to Cogman’s writing skill and mastery of plot development that by the end of The Secret Chapter I was still thoroughly entertained and sorry when the book came to an end.

This classy series just goes on delivering and is highly recommended for fans of good-quality portal fantasies. The ebook arc copy of The Secret Chapter was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest opinion of the book.
9/10

Sunday Post – 17th November, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

It’s been a horrible week. Himself sustained a shoulder injury, and has been in a great deal of pain throughout the week, despite a visit to the doctor and two physio sessions. Looking back, I realised that he has increasingly been unable to fully move his neck for a while but because he wasn’t suffering any pain, I didn’t do anything more about it. I wish I had. He is signed off work until Wednesday but barring a miracle I can’t see him returning. I hate seeing him suffer so much despite heat packs, cold compresses, Voltarol rubs, arnica oil massages, exercises, painkillers and using the trusty TENS machine.

To add to the general fun, that wretched headache I’d suffered last Friday hung around until Wednesday, as welcome as a bad smell, leaving me still exhausted and drained. I’ve missed writing group, the monthly West Sussex Writers’ Club meeting, and had to cancel a one-day Poetry Day I was supposed to be running yesterday.

Last week I read:

The Mortal Word – Book 5 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
A corrupt countess. A spy in danger. And an assassin at large.
Peace talks are always tricky . . . especially when a key diplomat gets stabbed. This murder rudely interrupts a top-secret summit between the warring dragons and Fae, so Librarian-spy Irene is summoned to investigate. In a version of 1890s Paris, Irene and her detective friend Vale must track down the killer – before either the peace negotiations or the city go up in flames. Accusations fly thick and fast. Irene soon finds herself in the seedy depths of the Parisian underworld on the trail of a notoriously warlike Fae, the Blood Countess. However, the evidence against the Countess is circumstantial. Could the assassin – or assassins – be closer than anyone suspects?
Cogman manages to successfully evoke the claustrophobic sense of closing timescales as problems multiply when deaths, kidnapping attempts and deadly attacks on the hotel holding the talks all stack up. I love the way we learn a little bit more about both the Fae and the dragon worlds with each book.

 

The Secret Chapter – Book 6 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
As Irene tries to manage a fraught Fae–dragon truce and her overbearing parents, she’s given a hot new mission. The world where she grew up is in danger and only one book can save it. This is held by Mr Nemo, secretive Fae villain and antique dealer, so Irene and Kai travel to his Caribbean retreat to strike a deal. But in return for the book, they must steal a painting from twenty-first-century Vienna. They’ll join a team of dragons, Fae gamblers and thieves, so their greatest challenge may be one another. And some will kill to protect this painting, which hides an extraordinary secret from a past age.
Yet another full-on adventure in this excellent paranormal series. I love the varying settings this portal fantasy provides, with a sympathetic, clever protagonist and wonderful pacing. Review to follow.

My posts last week:

Review of Sweep of the Blade – Book 4 of The Innkeeper Chronicles by Ilona Andrews

Friday Faceoff featuring Robots and the Empire – Book 4 of the Robot series by Isaac Asimov

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Body Tourists series by Jane Rogers

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Starship Alchemon by Christopher Hinz

Teaser Tuesday featuring Mantivore Prey – Book 2 of The Arcadian Chronicles by S.J. Higbee

Review of Bright Shards – Book 2 of the Vardeshi Saga by Meg Pechenick

Sunday Post 10th November 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

What happens when a bot writes your blog posts https://thisislitblog.com/2019/11/16/what-happens-when-a-bot-writes-your-blog-posts/ Shruti wondered whether she was replaceable as a blogger – the result is hilarious…

Linguistic Interventions (et tu Bayer?) https://writerunboxed.com/2019/11/15/this-is-not-why-we-scribe-bayer/ How much does the mangling of our language irritate you? Or don’t you care? Porter certainly does…

November 15th, “I Love to Write Day” https://literacyletters.wordpress.com/2019/11/15/november-15th-i-love-to-write-day/ Rae throws out the question – why do YOU love to write? Are you up for answering?

Non-Fiction November: Become an Expert… on Gender! https://rathertoofondofbooks.com/2019/11/11/non-fiction-november-become-the-expert-on-gender/ Hayley has decided to read a series of books on this complicated subject. What a cool way to investigate a tricky issue!

Ways to cope with a character death (and other unfortunate scenes) https://bookwyrmingthoughts.com/ways-to-cope-with-a-character-death-and-other-unfortunate-scenes/ Have you ever been traumatised by a character death? Sophia suggests ways of coping…

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week.

The Violent Fae Blog Tour – The Ordshaw Vignettes

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To celebrate the release of The Violent Fae, the closing chapter of the Ordshaw series’ The Sunken City Trilogy, Phil Williams is sharing twelve short stories from the city of Ordshaw. The Ordshaw Vignettes are tiny insights into life in the UK’s worst-behaved city, each presenting a self-contained mystery.

You can read today’s story below. For the full collection, visit all the wonderful blogs in the tour.

About Ordshaw and The Violent Fae

The Ordshaw series are urban fantasy thrillers set in a modern UK city with more than a few terrible secrets. The Violent Fae completes a story that began with Under Ordshaw and its sequel Blue Angel, which I reviewed yesterday, following poker player Pax Kuranes’ journey into the Ordshaw underworld. Over the space of one week, Pax unravels mysteries that warp reality and threaten the entire city.

The Violent Fae will be available from Amazon on Kindle and in paperback from November 5th 2019.

If these vignettes are your first foray in Ordshaw, note that Under Ordshaw is on offer on Kindle in the US and UK between October 28th October – 1st November.  

The Crane Driver

It was already late when the radio cut out. Sure way to make a long day longer. 350ft up in the crane, Dave had eyes on the roof and the waiting men, could easily lower the pipe into their waiting hands. But you didn’t do that. Didn’t touch a damn thing without the radio. He kept his hands away from the lever, eyes off the function displays – you do nothing until the banksman gets back in touch.

You had to keep cool, isolated in this little metal cage. No noise from the traffic, nor the shouts and clanks of the construction site. All you’ve got is crackling radio instructions, and that’s good because you need steel focus. Slow, steady, everyone depending on you.

When the radio cuts out, you wait.

Dave looked across the city rather than down at the blokes waving from the roof, just get the job done. Nope. He scanned the Net, a plain of buildings due north, the whole district in need of renovation. Lot of space there; if he got up some savings he was gonna take a crew himself, show some –

A blue spark drew his eye to a big red-brick church, taller than the surrounding derelicts. And – it came again – blue light sparked in its windows like someone flicking lights inside. Dave squinted. Welding? Half a dozen guys going at it throughout the church? Something unnatural there …

You saw weird things up here. The silence made them worse. Technical skill was one thing, a disregard for heights another. Dave had both in spades – could waltz along a high wire, though you wouldn’t get him down a sewer, not for all the tea in China. They’d had collapses, accidents in the metro. Much safer up here. But the crane had other dangers. You had to keep your head.

Barry Wicket, he got it bad. Hadn’t jumped but almost did. They were all shouting from the ground when they saw him perched on the crane arm. This high up, alone, hour after hour, it could make a man do things. Barry claimed he heard a little lady goading him. Wanted him to do it, said his life was worthless. He agreed. Only, last minute, the voice laughed at him and broke the spell. He was about to step off when it said, “Oh my God you’re actually going to do it?”

The voice in his head, mocking him. That confusion saved his life. Took him another hour but he made it down. He never went up again, Barry Wicket. Lost his license and saw a therapist, ended up a stadium steward. Got scared of being alone.

Proper creepy, Dave thought, that voice laughing after all that negative persuading. Might’ve saved Barry’s life, but left it sounding more real. Not just him freaking out, too weird for that. Then, a wandering mind went complicated places.

Yet thinking on that, Dave couldn’t deny the church was lighting up. These lances of light shot out the door – open, wasn’t it? Spitting lightning, like the building held a storm inside. Dave blinked, but it didn’t go away. He stared instead.

Finally, it stopped.

A dead, empty church again, another Net district husk.

Had he imagined it the same way Barry Wicket heard that voice?

“Dave – you with us?” the radio buzzed, and Dave threw himself back to the controls, focused on the displays to centre himself.

“Got you loud and clear, Bob,” he said.

“Good, great, not sure what cut us off. All good up there?”

“Hunky dory,” Dave answered. One focus now. Lower that pipe, get the job done. Definitely not thinking on whatever might or might not have been in that church. You saw weird things up there. Heard things, too. You didn’t dwell on it. Didn’t talk about it.

That’s how you got on.

Previous Story
For more Ordshaw shorts, you can check out yesterday’s story, The Concierge on Bookshine & Readbows. The next story, The Chemist, will be available on BiblioSanctum from October 28th.

Links:
The Violent Fae Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48246084-the-violent-fae
The Violent Fae UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07Y7CRV1L
The Violent Fae US: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07Y7CRV1L
Under Ordshaw Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/40092074-under-ordshaw
Under Ordshaw UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07CXYSZVN
Under Ordshaw US: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07CXYSZVN
Blue Angel Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/43232280-blue-angel
Blue Angel UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07L33XJZ7
Blue Angel US: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07L33XJZ7

Find Phil Williams: https://www.phil-williams.co.uk

Review of INDIE Ebook Blue Angel – Book 2 of The Ordshaw series by Phil Williams #Brainfluffbookreview #BlueAngelbookreview

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I read and thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this quirky series – see my review of Under Ordshaw. Now the third book is shortly coming out, and I’m part of the tour tomorrow, I wanted to catch up before The Violent Fae is released.

BLURB: Waking on an unfamiliar floor, Pax is faced with two hard truths. A murderous government agency wants her dead – and monsters really do exist. What’s more, her body’s going haywire, which she desperately hopes isn’t a side-effect of her encounters in the city’s tunnels. To survive, and protect Ordshaw, she’s got to expose who, or what, is behind the chaos – and she can’t do it alone. But with only the trigger-happy Fae to turn to, Pax’s allies might kill her before her enemies do…

My firm advice would be to get hold of Under Ordshaw before picking this one up, as Williams tips us straight into the middle of the action and while that keeps the pace going, you’ll be floundering if you don’t know who is doing what to whom. While this is urban fantasy, as it is about fabulous creatures lurking within the thickets of a large fictitious city somewhere in the UK, it has quite a different feel to the general run of UF books.

Williams has managed to create a cast of characters flailing around in the face of a host of paranormal events – and I do enjoy the fact that while the authorities do know about it, they are in various stages of denial about what is going on. Meanwhile Officialdom’s instinct is to cover up anything nasty that surfaces. This is all complicated by the simmering hostility between humanity and the fae. Forget Tinkerbell, these six-inch-high flying creatures are short-fused, generally hate humanity and armed with firepower capable of killing a human, despite their size.

A handful of folks have become involved, including Pax, and are grimly aware that something far more disturbing is going on than the comforting myth that the entity lurking below the city is mostly of benefit to the humans living on top of it. But they are having a major problem getting anyone to listen.

I liked the character development as we got to see more of Pax, and particularly her foul-mouthed tough companion, Letty. I also enjoyed watching Barton’s wife Holly in action – her fury at finding that her husband has been leading a double life all these years was both convincing and riveting. There are a couple of enjoyable set-piece battles that also had me turning the pages later at night than I should have, to discover what happened next. I look forward to discovering more about what exactly is going on under Ordshaw, in The Violent Fae at the beginning of November.

Recommended for fans of urban fantasy with a twist.
8/10

Sunday Post – 20th October, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

This has been a turbulent week weatherwise, with torrential downpours punctuated by bright spells of weather and over Thursday night and Friday, there were also a couple of thunderstorms. So it’s been hard to get washing dry outside, however the upside is that it is still mild for the time of year and we have also had some lovely rainbows.

I’ve been continuing with my Aerobics and Pilates classes and am gradually getting a bit fitter and less exhausted during and after the sessions. On Wednesday evening, I managed to make Writing Group which was lovely. I hadn’t been for a month and it was great to catch up with everyone and also get some valuable advice on the opening of Mantivore Warrior.

On Thursday, Sally came over and we started work on her second book. Editing is always such an intense business – I looked around twice and the day had gone, though I was absolutely shattered, to the extent that I spent part of Friday morning sleeping because when the alarm went off, I was just too tired to move. When I got up, I felt much better, but this week I must try to get to bed at a reasonable time as I’ve backslid badly. I needed to be sharp, as we collected the grandchildren on Friday after Oscar’s football practice – it was lovely to spend time with them again and catch up on their lives. Yesterday, we had a gathering of the clan at my sister’s flat. My parents and my sister’s sons and daughter-in-law travelled down to view her prospective new home and she also invited the four of us along. So ten of us, plus Darcy – Mum and Dad’s poodle – sat down to a delicious homemade curry lunch in with all the trimmings, while we provided the apple pudding in her compact flat. It was wonderful to catch up with everyone, who we hadn’t seen since David and Hannah’s wedding. For once the weather behaved and we were able to see my sister’s new home in brilliant sunshine and admire the views of Arundel Castle from her driveway.

I am still in the throes of the first draft of Mantivore Warrior and will be writing about my decision to include an extended flashback in tomorrow’s blog post.

Last week I read:

The Hidden Gallery – Book 2 of The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place by Maryrose Wood
Thanks to their plucky governess, Miss Penelope Lumley, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf cubs now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees. Yet the Incorrigibles are not entirely civilized, and still managed to ruin Lady Constance’s Christmas ball, nearly destroying the grand house. So while Ashton Place is being restored, Penelope, the Ashtons, and the children take up residence in London. As they explore the city, Penelope and the Incorrigibles discover more about themselves as clues about the children’s–and Penelope’s own–mysterious past crop up in the most unexpected ways…
I really enjoyed reading this second book in this series, though perhaps not quite as much as the first one. However, I am looking forward to finding out some answers to the thicket of questions surrounding the children and where they came from…

 

Blue Angel – Book 2 of the Ordshaw series by Phil Williams
Waking on an unfamiliar floor, Pax is faced with two hard truths. A murderous government agency wants her dead – and monsters really do exist. What’s more, her body’s going haywire, which she desperately hopes isn’t a side-effect of her encounters in the city’s tunnels. To survive, and protect Ordshaw, she’s got to expose who, or what, is behind the chaos – and she can’t do it alone. But with only the trigger-happy Fae to turn to, Pax’s allies might kill her before her enemies do…
This is the sequel to the quirky urban fantasy tale, Under Ordshaw and as Williams is releasing the third book in the series very shortly, I wanted to catch up before I fell further behind. Review to follow.

 

How To Fight a Dragon’s Fury – AUDIOBOOK 12 of the How To Train Your Dragon series by Cressida Cowell
The Doomsday of Yule has arrived, and the future of dragonkind lies in the hands of one boy with nothing to show but everything to fight for. Hiccup’s quest is clear…but can he end the rebellion? Can he prove himself to be king? Can he save the dragons? The stakes have never been higher, as the very fate of the Viking world hangs in the balance!
Very annoyingly, somehow I started listening to Book 11 in the series and switched into this, the final book without realising until near the end… Which was just amazing. I found it very emotional and uplifting – a truly epic fantasy written for children and yet also engrossing for hundreds of adult fans too. Review to follow.

 

First Flyght – Book 1 of The Flyght series by S.J. Pajonas
Vivian Kawabata can’t wait to claim her privileged destiny. But when the heir to the family agricultural empire finds her bank account empty while shopping for expensive shoes, she’s horrified to discover that her own brother has financially stabbed her in the back. To stand a chance of restoring her rightful place in the universe, the honest and rule-following Vivian may have to break a few intergalactic laws.
I thoroughly enjoyed this first book in a space opera adventure about a young woman struggling to earn enough to keep the family business after the betrayal of her shifty and shiftless brother. Vivian is an enjoyable heroine and I will be definitely reading more of her adventures. Review to follow.

My posts last week:

Review of Lady of Magick – Book 2 of the Noctis Magicae series by Sylvia Izzo Hunter

Friday Faceoff featuring Alien by Alan Dean Foster

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Doing Time – Book 1 of The Time Police by Jodi Taylor

Review of AUDIOBOOK The Empty Grave – Book 5 of Lockwood & Co series by Jonathan Stroud

Teaser Tuesday featuring Empire Games – Book 1 of the Empire Games series by Charles Stross

Reblog – Alvin and the area Alert to Literacy Efforts – Monday Memories

Authoring Annals 4 – Tweaking the Outline – Mantivore Warrior – Book 3 of The Arcadian Chronicles series

Sunday Post, 13th October 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Thursday Doors – Cottage Update https://jeanreinhardt.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/thursday-doors-cottage-update/ I followed the previous posts Jean published on the massive restoration of this cottage with interest – so these pics showing the completion of the project were a delight.

How to Train Your Editor Brain https://writerunboxed.com/2019/10/18/how-to-train-your-editor-brain/ Anyone who has attempted to complete a major writing project will know that finishing the first draft is just the start – it’s the editing which makes the difference between a well written, polished read and a muddled mess…

What Counts as Reading? https://emeraldcitybookreview.com/2019/10/what-counts-as-reading.html I thought this article was interesting in that it made me stop and consider my own assumptions on the subject. What do you think?

Waterford Walls 2019 https://inesemjphotography.com/2019/10/13/waterford-walls-2019/ And this is just a joy – what a wonderful way to bring art and beauty into an urban environment and why isn’t every town and city in the land also following this example?

Alvin and the area Alert to Literacy Efforts – Monday Memories https://powerfulwomenreaders.wordpress.com/2019/10/14/alvin-and-area-alert-to-literacy-efforts-monday-memories/ Yes… I know I also reblogged this during the week – something I hardly ever do, but I didn’t want anyone to miss this uplifting, amazing post…

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week.

Friday Faceoff – Gorgeous hair is the best revenge… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffhaircovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is now run by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is HAIR. I’ve changed things around this week – I’ve selected the series of covers produced for The Iron Druid series by Kevin Hearn, which I’ve always thought were so very well done. I love the fact it’s the same model throughout and that his hair is fabulous…

 

Hounded, the first in the series, was produced by Del Rey in May 2011 – and set the tone and style for the rest of the series. I love the fact he’s in a t-shirt, featuring THE sword and not even looking at us. And the way the light plays through that adorable blond hair is just so effective… This is Atticus as I’ve imagined him throughout the books.

 

Published in June 2011 by Del Rey, that hair is now being blown across his face as he faces off against a foe we can’t see. Interesting to note that this series started off being released so quickly…

 

This, the third in the series was released in July 2011 by Del Rey. I’ll be honest, this is probably my least favourite of all the covers. I don’t like the fact that the lower half of the cover is so very dark, effectively chopping poor old Atticus off at the waist. Still think the hair is awesome, though😊.

 

The fourth book was released in April 2012 by Del Rey – and now we see Atticus use his magic. I love the drama of this one and the lurid lighting – I think it’s one of the most eye-catching and attractive of them all.

 

This fifth book, released in November 2012, is a real contender as my favourite for the series – and to be honest, was the cover that popped into my mind when I saw that HAIR was this week’s theme. Two wonderful heads of hair for the price of one…

 

This one, published in June 2013, has Atticus once more brandishing his sword as he battles lethal gods and goddesses that he’s annoyed, with those storm-tossed blond locks looking so fabulously disarranged.

 

And – this cover is my favourite. Released in June 2014, I love the determined expression on his face… the way the light plays around his sword… the runes in the air… and of course, that hair.

 

This, the eighth book in the series clearly took a bit longer to write as it wasn’t released until January 2016 – and hats off to them that they still managed to feature the same model they’ve used throughout. I just wish the title font wasn’t quite so large, so we could see more of those stakes.

 

The final book in the series manages to produce a cover that defines the series – poor old Atticus still swinging that sword of his, looking seriously worried. Revisiting these covers has brought back a raft of really happy reading memories.

 

While I loved them, the only niggle I have is while there is a fair amount of angst, there are a lot of laugh-aloud moments in all the books, courtesy of Atticus’s greyhound, who has a telepathic link to the druid and a penchant for attractive female poodles and sausages. And there isn’t a hint of that humour in any of the covers. Ah well, they feature a gorgeous blond bloke – I suppose you can’t have everything… Which is your favourite cover?

Sunday Post – 1st September, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

It was another busy week – but far more sociable. Last Sunday we collected the children for a short stay before they returned to school this coming week, just as the temperature soared back into the 80s again. On Bank Holiday Monday we visited the Wetland and Wildfowl Trust, which we all thoroughly enjoyed – and were a bit shocked at how long it’s been since our last visit. The highlight was the boat ride through the reeds, as ever – but we also had great fun revisiting places where the children used to play, as the photo shows… On Tuesday we went to Worthing to our local Waterstones bookshop where both children bought books with their pocket money and on Wednesday, which was thankfully cooler – we visited Highdown Gardens before taking the children back home again. Their stay was over in the blink of an eye…

Wednesday evening was the first meeting of our writing group since our long break over the summer holidays – and we were celebrating the upcoming wedding of Liz, as this was her de facto Hen Night… Needless to say lots of laughter and jokes were flying around…

During the rest of the week, I’ve been working hard on an editing job, which I’m hoping to finish by tomorrow, as well as continuing to knock Mantivore Prey into something readable. Yesterday, I met up with my sister and we went looking at flats together, as she is hoping to buy somewhere local, instead of rent. Afterwards we had a coffee and cake together and a good old catchup.

Last week I read:

Keep Calm and Carry On, Children by Sharon K. Mayhew
Eleven-year-old Joyce and her little sister hide in their bomb shelter during the German Blitz on London, during World War II. After nights of bombing, it’s decided that they’ll join the over 800,000 children who’ve already been evacuated during Operation Pied Piper. They board a train not knowing where they’re going or who will take them in.
This children’s book set during the bombing of London in WWII is an excellent adventure, featuring the evacuation of thousands of children from the capital to surrounding towns and villages. Told from Joyce’s viewpoint, it gives a vivid picture of what it was like to experience such upheaval. Review to follow.

 

Brightfall by Jamie Lee Moyer
It’s been a mostly quiet life since Robin Hood denounced Marian, his pregnant wife, and his former life and retreated to a monastery to repent his sins . . . although no one knows what he did that was so heinous he would leave behind Sherwood Forest and those he loved most.

But when friends from their outlaw days start dying, Father Tuck, now the Abbott of St. Mary’s, suspects a curse and begs Marian to use her magic to break it. A grieving Marian bargains for protection for her children before she sets out with a soldier who’s lost his faith, a trickster Fey lord and a sullen Robin Hood, angry at being drawn back into the real world.
Another thoroughly enjoyable adventure featuring Maid Marion when she’s no longer a maid – or even Robin’s wife. I love the poignant turn that has the hero of Sherwood an embittered, fearful man. Review to follow.

 

The Missing Diamond Murder – Book 3 of the Black and Dod Mysteries series by Diane Janes
1930. Frances Black is worried – divorce proceedings are under way and her solicitor has learnt of a spiteful letter sent to the court claiming that there is more to her friendship with her sleuthing partner, Tom Dod, than meets the eye. Fran takes Tom’s advice to get away, travelling down to Devon to help the Edgertons with their family mystery. After meeting the charismatic Eddie Edgerton and arriving at their residence, Sunnyside House, Fran soon learns that Eddie’s grandfather, Frederick Edgerton, died in mysterious circumstances when his wheelchair went off a cliff. Was it really an accident? And what happened to Frederick’s precious diamond which went missing at the time of his death? As Fran investigates, she uncovers family scandal, skulduggery and revenge, but can she solve the mystery of the missing diamond?
This is one of my favourite murder mystery series – I have grown very fond of Frances. And it was a pleasant change to see her having a bit of fun, as well as trying to solve a theft and possible murder in a classic country house setting. Review to follow.

 

The Wee Free Men AUDIOBOOK – Book 1 of the Tiffany Aching series by Terry Pratchett
Nine-year-old Tiffany Aching needs magic–fast! Her sticky little brother Wentworth has been spirited away by the evil Queen of Faerie, and it’s up to her to get him back safely. Having already decided to grow up to be a witch, now all Tiffany has to do is find her power. But she quickly learns that it’s not all black cats and broomsticks. According to her witchy mentor Miss Tick, “Witches don’t use magic unless they really have to…We do other things. A witch pays attention to everything that’s going on…A witch uses her head…A witch always has a piece of string!” Luckily, besides her trusty string, Tiffany’s also got the Nac Mac Feegles, or the Wee Free Men on her side. Small, blue, and heavily tattooed, the Feegles love nothing more than a good fight except maybe a drop of strong drink!
I loved reading this series – but listening to Tony Robinson’s excellent narration was even more of a treat. Lovely to share snippets of it with the grandchildren, too…

My posts last week:

Review of Children No More – Book 4 of the Jon and Lobo series by Mark L. Van Name

Friday Faceoff featuring The Rules of Magic – prequel to the Practical Magic series by Alice Hoffman

Review of AUDIOBOOK A Room Full of Bones – Book 4 of the Ruth Galloway series by Elly Griffiths

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring Brightfall by Jamie Lee Moyer

Teaser Tuesday featuring The Missing Diamond Murder – Book 3 of the Black and Dod Mysteries series by Diane Janes

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of The Green Man’s Foe – Book 2 of The Green Man series by Juliet E. McKenna

Sunday Post – 25th August 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

(Good) Outlets for your drabbles https://earthianhivemind.net/2019/08/25/good-outlets-for-your-drabbles/ Steph has given a list for writers wishing to submit their microfiction – very useful. And if you haven’t played around with this writing form – it’s highly recommended.

Fantastic Find at the Bookstore #5: Prolific Garis family https://platformnumber4.com/2019/08/25/fantastic-find-at-the-bookstore-5-prolific-garis-family/ This is an amazing article that manages to link together three generations of a writing family by unearthing their books…

Wayfare Wednesdays! A Travelogue of Ports Unknown! https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordpress.com/2019/07/31/wayfare-wednesdays/ I love the ability to enjoy other people’s amazing tourist destinations without coping with dodgy toilets and weird food…

What in the Worldbuilding: Sports in Sci-Fi and Fantasy (Where are they?) https://pagesbelowvaultedsky.wordpress.com/2019/08/26/what-in-the-worldbuilding-sports-in-sci-fi-and-fantasy-where-are-they/ Loved this article – and am rather proud of my Zippo league in the Sunblinded trilogy as a consequence…

The Friday Face-Off: Yellow Cover http://booksbonesbuffy.com/2019/08/30/the-friday-face-off-yellow-cover/ While I, along with most other participants, chose a single book, Tammy elected to go for a variety of books featuring yellow covers – aren’t they pretty!

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week…