Tag Archives: Blogging community

Friday Faceoff – Every great story seems to begin with a snake… #Brainfluffbookblog

Standard

This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is SNAKES, so I’ve selected a book from one of my favourite series, Tongues of Serpents – Book 6 of the Temeraire series by Naomi Novik.

 

This edition was produced by Del Rey in July 2010 and features two snakelike dragons entwined around a porthole showing a ship. I really like the rippled sand as a backdrop, but I do think the fonts are very boring, given what an amazing premise this series offers.

 

Published in June 2011 by Voyager, this is the cover of the book that I read. I confess to loving this series with the black and white etched illustrations relating to incidents within the book and featuring amazing dragons. I also like the coloured font that is in keeping with the strong period feel of the cover and nicely pops against the black and white. This is my favourite.

 

Produced by Pocket in March 2013, this French edition follows the theme of the dragon coiled around a porthole or some sort of orb. I love the font – I think it works beautifully and picks up the gilding around the porthole very effectively. However, the stormy backdrop isn’t sufficient foil to the dark crimson/brown dragon and while those half-furled wings are wonderful, I’d rather the head was more of a feature. I’m also rather distracted by the shadow of the dragon against the clouds – surely that shouldn’t be happening?

 

This German edition, published by Penhaligon Verlag in 2010, is my favourite of all the similar designs where a dragon is coiled around some sort of globe. For starters, this dragon looks properly fierce and I love the way it has grasped the patterned globe, which is also beautifully patterned in colours that contrast very well with the hot reds and oranges of the dragon and the scaled background – another nice feature. It was so nearly my favourite, but I found the font both plain and a poor contrast to the rest of the cover.

 

This Polish edition, published by Rebis in October 2010 is the cover that gave me the chance to actually choose this book. Instead of dragons, we have two snakes battling on this cover. While it all looks very dramatic, I’m not sure the snakes are all fully in proportion – it seems one of them is rather on the short side, but perhaps the hidden part of the body conceals several coils… Once again, that rippled sand effect is a great backdrop, but disappointingly this Polish cover has gone down the route of also duplicating the very dreary, if clear, font from the Del Rey cover. Which is your favourite?

Advertisements

Friday Faceoff – Laughter is the best medicine… Brainfluffbookblog

Standard

This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is a HUMOUR so I’ve selected Eligible – Book 4 of the Austen Project by Curtis Sittenfeld.

This edition was produced by Random House in April 2016. The bright red cover with the curling font and line drawing of an outsized diamond ring gives a big clue that this is a romcom. I like this one – it’s bold, eye-catching and cheerful and certainly helped me decide to get hold of the book.

 

Published in May 2016 by The Borough Press, this one isn’t so successful as far as I’m concerned. While the girl is clearly beautiful – I don’t know why she decided to kiss the palm of her own hand and then start waving around. If there is a joke connected to this, then it’s slipped past me – and that isn’t a good feeling, either. I also dislike the amount of chatter on the cover, including that nasty intrusive blob.

 

This Swedish edition, published by Wahlström & Widstrand in January 2017, is a successful effort I really like. The eggshell background works well with the gold edging and the stars and the two rings let us know it is a romcom. I also appreciate the decorative font and the clean, restrained use of colour.

 

Produced by Mona Kitap in 2017, this Turkish edition also makes it quite clear that this novel is a comedy. The classic pink cover shouts romcom – however I do feel that while the updated Bennet family depicted around the cover is a nice idea, the figures are too small to produce strong eye appeal and end up looking rather random. Though I like the cat… At least I have a strong idea of the genre.

 

This German edition, published by HarperCollins in June 2017 is my favourite. The colour scheme with the eggshell blue background and lovely sprigs of those blowsy, heavily scented heritage roses give a lovely nod to the Austin roots of this book, as does that silhouette. Of all the covers, this one is the classiest and – I think – most accurately reflects the blending of old and new in the Austen Project series. Which is your favourite?

Increasing Discoverability for Women Authors in SFF – 2018

Standard

Over the last few years, inspired by the awesome Jo Hall, I have made a point of ensuring that I read a higher number of women authors, given they are under-represented on bookshelves and in reviews. I have also ensured that a proportion of those women are new to me. Last year, I read 162 books, with 47 of those by women writers I hadn’t previously read, which is 27% of my reading list. If you’re interested in such things and haven’t yet seen the post, I have discussed my 2018 Reading List and the stats here.

Below I have listed the books I’ve read, linked to available reviews, which I’ve also posted on Goodreads and Amazon UK. Some reviews have not yet been released, while a handful I haven’t reviewed.

Here they are:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
The Cottingley Secret by Gaynor Hazel
Talon – Book 1 of the Talon series Julie Kagawa
Keeper by Kim Chance
Keeper of the Watch: Dimension 7 – Book 1 by Kristen L. Jackson
Going Grey – Book 1 of the Ringer series by Karen Traviss
Fire and Bone – Book 1 of the Otherborn series by Rachel A. Marks
The Magic Chair Murder: a 1920s English Mystery – A Black and Dods Mystery: 1 by Diane Janes
Reclaiming Shilo Snow – Book 2 of The Evaporation of Sofi Snow series by Mary Weber
A Pair of Docks – Book 1 of the Derivatives of Displacement series by Jennifer Ellis
The Cold Between – A Central Corps novel by Elizabeth Bonesteel
Children of the Shaman – Book 1 of the Children of the Shaman by Jessica Rydill
The Blood – Book 3 of the Jem Flockhart series by E.S. Thomson
Witch at Heart – Book 1 of the Jinx Hamilton Mystery series by Juliette Harper
Song of Blood and Stone – Book 1 of the Earthsinger Chronicles by L. Penelope
Scylla & Charybdis by Lindsey Duncan
Crimson Ash by Hayley Sulich
Furyborn – Book 1 of the Empirium series by Claire Legrand
The Watchmaker’s Daughter – Book 1 of the Glass and Steele series by C.J. Archer
Gwithyas: Door to the Void by Isha Crowe
Drifters’ Alliance – Book 1 of the Drifters’ Alliance series by Elle Casey
The Tethered Mage – Book 1 of the Swords and Fire series by Melissa Caruso
All Systems Red – Book 1 of the Murderbot Diaries by Martha Welles
Nolander – Book 1 of the Emanations series by Becca Mills
Drop by Drop – Book 1 of the Step by Step series by Morgan Llywelyn
Fawkes by Nadine Brandes
Throne of Glass – Book 1 of the Throne of Glass series by Sarah J. Maas
The Great Alone by Kristen Hannah
The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar
Pirate Nemesis – Book 1 of the Telepathic Space Pirates by Carysa Locke
Anachronism by Jennifer Lee Rossman
Fallen Princeborn: Stolen by Jean Lee
Kindred Spirits – Book 5 of the Gabriel Ash and Hazel Best series by Jo Bannister
A Muddle of Magic – Book 2 of the Fledgling Magic series by Alexandra Rushe
Unwritten by Tara Gilboy
Immortal Creators – Book 2 of the Immortal Writers series by Jill Bowers
Spinning Thorns by Anna Sheehan
Athena’s Champion – Book 1 of the Olympus trilogy by David Hair and Cath Mayo
Together by Julie Cohen
Caraval – Book 1 of the Caraval series by Stephanie Garber
A Secret History of Witches by Louisa Morgan
The Dirigible King’s Daughter by Alys West
Star Nomad – Book 1 of the Fallen Empire series by Lindsey Buroker
The High Ground – Book 1 of the Imperials series by Melinda M. Snodgrass
Six of Crows – Book 1 of Six of Crows series by Leigh Bardugo
The Echoes of Sol – Books 1-3 Boxed Set by Charissa Dufour
The Race by Nina Allan
The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas

Friday Faceoff – This is the priest all shaven and shorn… Brainfluffbookblog

Standard

This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is a PRIEST OR MONK, so I’ve selected The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

 

This edition was produced by Harvest Books in September 1994. I think is a shocking cover, when you look at it really closely. The row of skulls in the black darkness are raining a stream of blood onto a wall, spattering the kneeling priests and almost obliterating the king seated on the throne. The title font is well executed with that bloody wall as a backdrop. I think it effectively represents this remarkable book which has stayed with me ever since I read it soon after it was published, though it isn’t my favourite.

 

Published in June 1983 by Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (NYC), this cover has gone for a full-on medieval vibe. It is depicting some of what is going on within the confines of the abbey, where it should all be about praying and contemplating God. It is certainly colourful and eye-catching, though whether it gives a sense of the murder mystery at the heart of the book is debatable.

 

This edition, published by Vintage Books in April 2004 is my favourite. It is beautiful, with the star-studded sky, the gold author font jumping out from the black backdrop and the red-tinged abbey providing more than a hint of menace. I particularly love the lovely curling title font which finishes the effect.

 

Produced by Picador in October 1984, this one is a close contender for my favourite. It’s such a cleverly designed cover, using the medieval script to highlight the period and setting of the book. Not only is it featured in the title, which is beautifully linked to the drawing of the rose, but also used in the blurb to explain the book. And for once – this cover chatter which is always a pet peeve of mine – absolutely works. This so very nearly is my favourite…

 

This edition, published by Vintage in 2004 is another attractive, eye-catching offering. However I think the title font could have a bit more punch and their approach to the author font is plain odd. Who else wondered whether the author is called Vintage Eco when they read it? Such a shame to make such a fundamental, silly mistake, given the strong execution of that lovely rose illustration. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Time travel is possible. Will explain later. #Brainfluffbookblog

Standard

This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the object this week featuring on any of our covers or the story is an AMULET, so I’ve selected a book I haven’t yet had the pleasure of reading, The Story of the Amulet – Book 3 of the Five Children series by E. Nesbit.

 

This edition was produced by Penguin Classics in March 1995. I love the artwork and the green-hued backdrop which gives a real sense of the drama and danger of a trip back to Egypt. But that clunky red something doesn’t remotely resemble any amulet I’ve ever seen – what a shame, given the wonderful lighting giving it centre stage. And my other peeve is that dreadful red text box plonked right across all that fabulous detail…

 

Published by Penguin Classics in March 2018, this is a much better effort. The colouring is attractive and I love the scene within a scene, giving a hint of the time travelling theme. The style, along with the children featured in the Egypt makes it clear this is a children’s story. I also love that font – this is my favourite.

 

Produced by Smk Books in March 2009, the amulet featured on the front of this cover is beautiful and draws the eye, while the font is attractive and easy to read. However, my concern is that there is nothing on this cover that informs the reader that this is a children’s book.

 

This Kindle edition is certainly eye-catching. But the golden rule must be that a cover should reflect the content and the etched figures being swallowed up as they enter that brooding gothic building give a sense that it’s a horror story. And it isn’t – it is a lesser-known book in one of the most famous early fantasy tales for children.

 

This is another attractive, striking contender, published by Virago in 2018. The warm yellow backdrop is welcoming and I love all the details on the cover that directly link up to the content. While the title is inoffensively clear, I do feel that Times New Roman is a bit joyless for one of the first time-travelling adventures written for children. It’s the main reason why this one isn’t my favourite – but what do you think?

Friday Faceoff – If my head would win him a castle in France, it should not fail to go… #Brainfluffbookblog

Standard

This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is the TUDOR PERIOD, so I’ve selected one of my favourite reads of this excellent series, Dark Fire – Book 2 of the Matthew Shardlake series by C.J. Sansom.

This edition was produced by Penguin in December 2005 and features a blazing London cityscape. I love the artwork and drama – but loathe that red blob plonked in the middle of scene announcing that this is a Matthew Shardlake thriller. What’s wrong with adding that detail under the main title?

 

Published in May 2007 by Pan Books, I love the drama of this ancient text being engulfed by flames – the title font is awesome. But I don’t like the lack of additional information, like the fact that this is the second book of the series, which is a serious fail.

 

This edition, published by Viking Books in January 2005, at least includes some of the vital information on it. I very much like the title text box as a ripped scroll, though I do feel they have been a tad too clever adding the St George’s Cross, which instead looks like a cross put in the corner by a grumpy teacher. The actual artwork is skilful, with the half-hidden swordsman in the foreground and the Tudor building behind him, but it doesn’t have much impact in thumbnail.

 

Produced by Pan Books in 2005, this dramatic depiction is my favourite for the sheer drama of the cover. The fire roaring through the windows with the winding stone staircase in the foreground immediately pulls us into the scene. I also love the stylish lettering of the title font – but again, why is it such an almighty secret that Dark Fire is the second Matthew Shardlake book in the series? It’s unforgiveable to leave a detail like that off the front cover, I feel. Notwithstanding this egregious omission, this is my favourite cover.

 

This German edition, published by Fischer in 2011 is another stylish offering in the form of a Tudor book, complete with the elaborate hinges and attractive font – though again, there isn’t a mention that this is part of a best-selling series. Which is your favourite?

My 2018 Reading Year – the statistics #Brainfluffbookblog #BrainfluffReadingYear2018

Standard

It’s been a really great reading year with loads of choice within my favourite genres. Although I kept my reading challenge to read and review at least 100 books, I ended up reading 162 books with 125 reviews published and another 23 in hand.

 

I have read 104 books written by female authors and 60 by men – the sharp-eyed among you will have notice that adds up to 164, but there were two books in this year’s list with joint authorship – Windhaven by George R.R. Martin and Lisa Tuttle and Athena’s Champion by David Hair and Cath Mayo.

 

In a related challenge I set myself the task of reading at least two books by female authors previously unknown to me in the Discovery Challenge, as set out by Jo Hall. I managed to read 43 books in this category, which is 27% of my 2018 reading list, while 32 books were by male authors I hadn’t previously read, which means that 47% of the book I read last year were by authors new to me. I’m really happy with that – it means I am continuing to expand my reading experience, rather than only sticking with authors I know and like, which was the case before I started this challenge.

 

I have continued requesting review copies from Netgalley and have also occasionally taken review copies from writing colleagues, so that during 2018 I read and reviewed 64 new releases. I also was determined to read more books on my ever-teetering TBR pile – in the event I managed 55 books, which I’m really pleased about. The huge shock is that this year we only read 6 library books – this simply won’t do. I am a real fan of our local library and I am determined that during the coming year, we will be using the library a whole lot more, otherwise we risk losing it.

 

In 2018 I read 72 science fiction books, 57 fantasy books, 19 crime adventures, 6 contemporary fiction, 4 historical books, 4 non-fiction books. Science fiction includes sub-genres such as space opera, colony adventures, apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic, time travel, alternate history, military, futuristic crime, literary and steampunk. Fantasy includes sub-genres such as epic, urban, swords and sorcery, musket and magic, sand and sorcery, underworld, historical, grimdark and coming of age. While I’m aware I probably should widen my reading, I’m not going to. I read for pleasure and escape, these days. I reckon I’ve earnt the right.

 

So much for my determination to read more children’s books… I’m going to give up on this one. It clearly isn’t going to happen, given this has been an ongoing target ever since I started monitoring my reading statistics and each year it’s been a failure. But this year that failure has reached a new low – last year I read 19 children’s books in comparison to the measly 6 of this year. Whereas YA is holding fairly constant at 34 this year, compared with 30 last year.

 

This is a new category I have added. I have read 52 books by small presses and self-published authors, which is 32% of my 2018 reading list. This is an outcome I would like to improve on next year.

How did you get on this year with your reading targets and challenges?

Teaser Tuesday – 8th January, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #TeaserTuesday

Standard

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This is my choice of the day:
The High King’s Vengeance – Book 2 of Malessar’s Curse by Stephen Poore

p. 295 There was too much in her head. Her father. Her grandfather. Hetch. The remnants of Guhl’s Company, bound to her service now. The shieldmen, two hundred walking reminders of a man she thought she had loved. All the stories she had ever heard her father tell; those Baum and Malessar debunked or expanded upon. The dragons of Lyriss, and their uncertain allegiance. Craw – the damned beast still knew more than it would tell her, and where was it now her gamble was approaching the endgame?
And all of that was accompanied by the constant thrumming of Jedrell’s wardrums, a sound that only she could hear. Sometimes she thought it was all she could hear.

BLURB: “I am the Heir to the North.”

Malessar’s Curse is broken, the wards around Caenthell destroyed. The Warlock himself lies, exhausted and gravely wounded, in the rubble of his own house. And while the dire spirits trapped behind the wards for centuries are unleashed into the world once more, Cassia is confined to a cell deep in Galliarca’s grand palace.

Yet Caenthell calls to her, and Cassia must answer. As Heir to the North, the throne and the power behind it belong to her. But the twisted hunger of Caenthell’s spirits appals her and Cassia vows to do everything she can to defeat them.

I loved the first book in this epic fantasy story – Heir to the North. Poore takes all the major ingredients of an epic fantasy tale, gives it a good shaking and sets it on its head. So it’s an itinerant storyteller’s daughter who finds she is the unlikely inheritor of a terrible curse, not the well-groomed, handsome prince accompanying her. As in the first book, I’m finding this one an engrossing read as the classic tropes within epic fantasy are playing out in unpredictable, interesting ways.

Friday Faceoff – Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of earth… Brainfluffbookblog

Standard

 

If I haven’t already said it to you – I wish you a very happy, healthy 2019! This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is a FRESH START, so I’ve selected one of my outstanding reads of 2018 – Windhaven by George R.R. Martin and Lisa Tuttle – see my review here.

 

This edition was produced by Gollancz in February 2015. It is one of the more stripped-back covers, but I do love the vibrant background colour with the embossed, bevelled font and the outline of the wing – the badge of the flyers. The result is eye-catching, classy and my favourite.

 

Published in April 2003 by Bantam, I do like the seascape and the flyer high up in the sky. But I was aggravated that the magnified image isn’t the same, given that the angle of wings is wrong. It makes me wonder if the cover designer thinks the readership are so stupid as to miss a detail like that…

 

This edition, published by Bantam in October 2012, is essentially the same basic cover as the first one, but it is startling to see just what a difference another background colour makes to the overall mood and feel of the design. While I like it, I don’t love as much as the first example.

 

Produced by Saída de Emergência in May 2013, this Portuguese edition is a strong contender. I love the artwork and the dramatic scenery, which is exactly as I envisage Windhaven. The scene highlights just how vulnerable and dangerous the flyers are as they face the elements and this cover is a close contender for the favourite spot.

 

This Italian edition, published by Mondadori in 2015 is another dramatic offering. This time we come face to face with young Mari, who stares straight out at the readers, defiantly wearing her wings with a stormy sky as a backdrop. The reason why this one isn’t a favourite is down to a personal peeve of mine. She is far too lightly dressed for a journey on such a stormy planet, when she will be travelling over water. I also think that sticker would be better off in the corner, rather than intruding on the rather fine artwork.

Which is your favourite?

Christmas Quiz 2018 – #BrainfluffChristmasQuiz2018

Standard

When Gran was alive, during our family gatherings we used to play Christmas games. Gran particularly loved general knowledge quizzes, but with 5 generations ranging from the late nineties down to a three year old, it posed something of a challenge. So each year I devised multiple choice questions and everyone played in pairs, which gave even the youngest a chance of answering correctly. Gran is no longer with us, but if you happen to gather in a multi-generational mash-up to celebrate Christmas perhaps this will pass some time between opening presents and tucking into the seasonal feast.

Many thanks for your support and company throughout the year – I hope you have a lovely holiday, whatever your beliefs and whoever you are celebrating with.

1) What was asked for in the Christmas song?
a. Two front teeth                                               c. Three pairs of socks
b. Four DVD’s                                                     d. Five sets of smellies

2) What colour was Rudolf’s nose?
a. Green                                                             c. Mauve
b. Red                                                                d. Black

3) Where does Father Christmas live?
a. The moon                                                     c. Iceland
b. Greenland                                                    d. Lapland

4) How many sides does a snowflake have?
a. Five                                                              c. Eight
b. Six                                                               d. Twelve

5) In the Christmas song, who ‘are getting fat’?
a. Mothers preparing food                            c. Turkeys
b. Reindeer                                                    d. Geese

6) In the song ‘Rudolf the …..nosed reindeer, how is it described? ‘You would even say it…
a. Runs                                                           c. Glows
b. Blows                                                         d. Sneezes

7) In the song ’12 Days of Christmas’ what does my true love give on the fifth day?
a. Lords a leaping                                          c. Swans a swimming
b. Gold rings                                                  d. French hens

8) Where do poinsettias originally come from?
a. Mexico                                                       c. Brazil
b. Peru                                                           d. Venezuela

9) What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?
a. A special knitted scarf                              c. His carrot nose
b. An old top hat                                         d. His coal eyes and stone teeth

10) Who was the composer of The Nutcracker ballet?
a. Handel                                                     c. Bach
b. Tchaikvosky                                             d. Mozart

11) Who was the first English king or queen to have a Christmas tree?
a. King Henry VIII                                        c. Queen Elizabeth I
b. King Charles II                                         d. Queen Victoria

12) In the song ‘We Wish You a Merry Christmas’ what pudding is asked for?
a. Figgy pudding                                        c. Plum pudding
b. Sticky toffee pudding                             d. Rice pudding

13) What was Joseph’s job?
a. Fisherman                                               c. Farmer
b. Carpenter                                               d. Builder

14) Which one of these is NOT one of Father Christmas’s reindeer?
a. Dixen                                                     c. Rudolf
b. Donner                                                  d. Dasher

15) Good King Wenceslas ruled which country?
a. Hungary                                                c. Flanders
b. Czechoslovakia                                     d. Bohemia

16) Where did the real St Nicholas used to live?
a. Lapland                                                 c. Greece
b. Turkey                                                   d. Hungary

17) What did Harry Potter get for Christmas in his first term at Hogwarts?
a. Invisibility cloak                                    c. X-box
b. Book of spells                                       d. An owl

18) What is the name of Tiny Tim’s father in A Christmas Carol?
a. Ben Sackett                                           c. Bob Cratchit
b. Bart Hatchet                                         d. Bill Scratchit

19) What drink was adapted to become the American Christmas drink ‘egg nog’?
a. The Scandinavian drink ‘Glogg’            c. The Austrian drink ‘Gluhwein’
b. The French drink ‘Lait de Poule’           d. The German drink ‘Biersuppe’

20) Who invented the Christmas cracker?
a. George Cracker                                    c. Tom Smith
b. Thomas Edison                                    d. Prince Albert

Christmas Quiz 2018 – Answers
1) What was asked for in the Christmas song?
c. Two front teeth                                     c. Three pairs of socks
d. Four DVD’s                                           d. Five sets of smellies

2) What colour was Rudolf’s nose?
c. Green                                                   c. Mauve
d. Red                                                      d. Black

3) Where does Father Christmas live?
c. The moon                                            c. Iceland
d. Greenland                                           d. Lapland

4) How many sides does a snowflake have?
c. Five                                                     c. Eight
d. Six                                                      d. Twelve

5) In the Christmas song, who ‘are getting fat’?
c. Mothers preparing food                    c. Turkeys
d. Reindeer                                            d. Geese

6) In the song ‘Rudolf the …..nosed reindeer, how is it described? ‘You would even say it…
c. Runs                                                   c. Glows
d. Blows                                                 d. Sneezes

7) In the song ’12 Days of Christmas’ what does my true love give on the fifth day?
c. Lords a leaping                                  c. Swans a swimming
d. Gold rings                                          d. French hens

8) Where do poinsettias originally come from?
c. Mexico                                               c. Brazil
d. Peru                                                   d. Venezuela

9) What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?
c. A special knitted scarf                       c. His carrot nose
d. An old top hat                                  d. His coal eyes and stone teeth

10) Who was the composer of The Nutcracker ballet?
c. Handel                                              c. Bach
d. Tchaikvosky                                      d. Mozart

11) Who was the first English king or queen to have a Christmas tree?
a. King Henry VIII                                 c. Queen Elizabeth I
b. King Charles II                                  d. Queen Victoria

12) In the song ‘We Wish You a Merry Christmas’ what pudding is asked for?
a. Figgy pudding                                 c. Plum pudding
b. Sticky toffee pudding                      d. Rice pudding

13) What was Joseph’s job?
a. Fisherman                                       c. Farmer
b. Carpenter                                       d. Builder

14) Which one of these is NOT one of Father Christmas’s reindeer?
a. Dixen                                               c. Rudolf
b. Donner                                            d. Dasher

15) Good King Wenceslas ruled which country?
a. Hungary                                          c. Flanders
b. Czechoslovakia                               d. Bohemia

16) Where did the real St Nicholas used to live?
a. Lapland                                           c. Greece
b. Turkey                                            d. Hungary

17) What did Harry Potter get for Christmas in his first term at Hogwarts?
a. Invisibility cloak                              c. X-box
b. Book of spells                                 d. An owl

18) What is the name of Tiny Tim’s father in A Christmas Carol?
a. Ben Sackett                                    c. Bob Cratchit
b. Bart Hatchet                                  d. Bill Scratchit

19) What drink was adapted to become the American Christmas drink ‘egg nog’?
a. The Scandinavian drink ‘Glogg’     c. The Austrian drink ‘Gluhwein’
b. The French drink ‘Lait de Poule’    d. The German drink ‘Biersuppe’

20) Who invented the Christmas cracker?
a. George Cracker                             c. Tom Smith
b. Thomas Edison                             d. Prince Albert