Category Archives: fantasy

Teaser Tuesday – 16th July, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #TeaserTuesday

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Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This is my choice of the day:

The Forbidden Wish by Jessica Khoury
1% I reach as far as I can, sensing his quiet breath, his hammering heart. Who is he? How did he find this place? He is just a boy, a moment in time that will soon pass. I have known a thousand and one like him. I will know a thousand and one more. He is nothing. I tell myself this, so that I will not hope for him. I am not allowed to hope. I am forbidden a wish of my own. And so I will not think of the world above, of the open sky, of the fresh air and the light of day. I will not show how madly, deeply, desperately I want the boy to carry my lamp out of this accursed darkness. Instead, I fold and unfold, I swirl and I curl, waiting with bated breath.

BLURB: When Aladdin discovers Zahra’s jinni lamp, Zahra is thrust back into a world she hasn’t seen in hundreds of years—a world where magic is forbidden and Zahra’s very existence is illegal. She must disguise herself to stay alive, using ancient shape-shifting magic, until her new master has selected his three wishes.

Early days, but I love the writing so far and the vivid sense of being trapped and aware for faaaar too long. I am in a bit of a reading slump right now – fingers crossed this one will haul me out of it!

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Sunday Post – 14th July, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Annddd – it’s been yet another manic week. Last Sunday we had a small get-together at our house to celebrate my sister’s 60th birthday which occurred earlier in the year. The theory in having it during July would be that we would be more likely to be able to have the party in the garden, given that our house isn’t all that big. The weather during most of June and July has been amazingly sunny and warm – until last Sunday, when it rained until the early afternoon. And no – it hasn’t rained since. However the rain wasn’t sufficient to dampen the warmth of the gathering, which spent most of the time laughing…

On Monday and Thursday, Sally and I worked on her book – we are now on the last lap, which is exciting. On Tuesday I was asked to run two Creative Writing sessions at the annual College Conference, so that other staff members could get a taster for the subject. It was initially a bit nerve-racking delivering my presentation to my peers, but I soon got caught up in the subject and thoroughly enjoyed the experience. On Thursday evening, I made it to the West Sussex Writers’ meeting for the first time since April and found it really interesting to hear a number of members’ writing experiences.

We are still trying to get the house organised – the kitchen is now looking a lot better and I am still putting the finishing touches to the bathroom. However, we have had yet another blow – the concrete canopy over the back door is badly cracked and needs taking down and the back door replaced, which is going to cost thousands of pounds. Again… Given we are still reeling after having had the roof replaced, we would ideally like to be able to put this project in the Pending box – but we can’t. It’s dangerous, as if the cracking around the corner continues, a large chunk of concrete would break away and fall. So work is due to start on Monday week. Didn’t I pick a good time to resign from my job at Northbrook?

Last week I read:

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
The Jazz Age is in full swing, but Casiopea Tun is too busy cleaning the floors of her wealthy grandfather’s house to listen to any fast tunes. Nevertheless, she dreams of a life far from her dusty small town in southern Mexico. A life she can call her own. Yet this new life seems as distant as the stars, until the day she finds a curious wooden box in her grandfather’s room – and opens it…
That’s as much of the chatty blurb I’m willing to reveal – but this Cinderella-type story set within the Mexican pantheon is a delight. No one else writes quite like Moreno-Garcia and I will be reviewing this book in due course.

 

The Garden Club Murder – Book 2 of the Tish Tarragon series by Amy Patricia Meade
Literary caterer Letitia ‘Tish’ Tarragon is preparing her English Secret Garden-themed luncheon for Coleton Creek’s annual garden club awards, but when she is taken on a tour of some of the top contenders with the garden club’s president, Jim Ainsley, Tish is surprised at how seriously the residents take the awards – and how desperate they are to win. Wealthy, retired businessman Sloane Shackleford has won the coveted best garden category five years in a row, but he and his Bichon Frise, Biscuit, are universally despised. When Sloane’s bludgeoned body is discovered in his pristine garden, Tish soon learns that he was disliked for reasons that go beyond his green fingers. Have the hotly contested awards brought out a competitive and murderous streak in one of the residents?
This was great fun with plenty of prospective suspects and enjoyable characters – but I’ll be honest, the denouement had me scratching my head. Unless justice works very differently on the other side of the Pond, I can’t see quite how the ending would work… I will be reviewing this one in due course.

 

Till Sudden Death Do Us Part – Book 7 of the Ishmael Jones series by Simon R. Greene
Although he hasn’t seen Robert Bergin for 40 years, Ishmael feels duty bound to respond when his old friend calls for help. Robert’s daughter Gillian is about to be married, and he is afraid she’ll fall prey to the ancient family curse. Arriving in rural Yorkshire, Ishmael and his partner Penny learn that the vicar who was to perform the ceremony has been found dead in the church, hanging from his own bell rope. With no clues, no evidence and no known motive, many locals believe the curse is responsible. Or is someone just using it as a smokescreen for murder? With the wedding due to take place the following day, Ishmael has just a few hours to uncover the truth. But his investigations are hampered by sudden flashes of memory: memories of the time before he was human. What is it Ishmael’s former self is trying to tell him … ?
Those of you who follow my blog will know that this series is a long-running favourite for me. I thoroughly enjoy Green’s tongue-in-cheek humour in this quirky science fiction whodunit. I particularly enjoyed this one as we learn quite a bit more about the non-human aspect of Jones… Review to follow.

My posts last week:

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of The First Time Lauren Pailing Died by Alyson Rudd

Friday Faceoff featuring wraparound cover Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.R. Rowling

Review of INDIE Ebook Scavenger Blood – Book 2 of the Exodus series by Janet Edwards

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Soundcloud interview with the cast from LOOT (including my son, Robbie Jarvis)
https://soundcloud.com/betterlemons/loot It’s lovely to hear Rob talking with such enthusiasm about his current project – I would have loved to go and see it, but it simply isn’t possible, given the distance involved and the cost of getting there…

The Best of Early Wyndham https://interestingliterature.com/2019/07/05/the-best-of-early-wyndham/ This marvellous site once more has come up trumps. I loved John Wyndham’s writing – and Oliver Tearle’s informative article discusses some of his early work before he became deservedly well known.

Monday Chuckles, reblogged from the Bluebird of Bitterness… https://blogging807.wordpress.com/2019/07/03/monday-chuckles-3/ We always need something to make us smile on Mondays…

Trying to Make Your Story “Unique”? Beware of These Common Pitfalls https://www.janefriedman.com/pitfalls-of-unique-stories/ This is required reading, not just for writers but also for readers, who will probably be nodding in frantic agreement at some of the points Jane makes.

Blog Maintenance https://caffeinatedbookreviewer.com/2019/07/blog-maintenance.html One of the most effective and prolific book bloggers I know gives a series of tips on how to keep our blogs user friendly and looking spiffy.

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week…

Friday Faceoff – Wrap your mind around my thoughts as I wrap my soul around your heart… #BrainfluffFridayFaceoff #FridayFaceoffWraparound

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week is a WRAPAROUND cover, so I have selected Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling because it’s just lovely. I hope you like it, too😊

 

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The First Time Lauren Pailing Died by Alyson Rudd #Brainfluffbookreview #TheFirstTimeLaurenPailingDiedbookreview

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I requested this one as I am always a sucker for any book that mucks about with time – and was delighted when I was approved…

Lauren Pailing is a teenager in the eighties, becomes a Londoner in the nineties. And each time she dies, new lives begin for the people who loved her – while Lauren enters a brand new life, too. But in each of Lauren’s lives, a man called Peter Stanning disappears. And, in each of her lives, Lauren sets out to find him.

Strictly speaking this is historical, as the story starts back in the late 1960s, but like many others reading this one, the period covered also deals with my past. So the first question – does Rudd convincingly portray the recent past without holding up the narrative? Yes – she manages to slip in all sorts of little details that I had forgotten, yet were immediately recognised as I encountered them. I didn’t spot any anomalies, either – which, along with the accomplished writing and strong characterisation, helped to pull me completely into the story.

Lauren was well depicted as a small child, which isn’t as easy as Rudd makes it look, which is important, given her age when the first jolt out of time occurs. I was shaken at how Rudd tackles this – Lauren resurfaces into another timestrand where things are slightly different but largely the same. It would have been so easy to make this tediously slow-paced, or not quite convincing – showing slight differences is always harder to achieve than large, dramatic flourishes. But Rudd handles all this with ease, giving us a ringside seat into Lauren’s struggles to come to terms with what is happening to her, as well as allowing us to see how her death has affected her close relatives. As time goes by, we continue to track everyone most hurt by Lauren’s untimely death in a way that had me unable to put down the book.

Meanwhile, I also really liked how the two personalities are merged as Lauren copes in her new timestrand and learns not to mention what went before. However, the question of Peter Stanning and his sudden disappearance slowly emerges throughout all the timelines – and once Lauren realises this, she clings to the mystery of his absence, determined to try to hunt him down…

I’ll be honest – I’m not convinced that this particular plotline is wholly successful. While I liked the idea of Peter’s disappearance running through all the timelines, I felt this was built into a major mystery that was at odds with the final denouement. However, this could well have been deliberate, as the circumstances surrounding what happened to Peter and how that affected both his wife and sons, also added to the poignancy of his death.

While I had been expecting an entertaining read, I was unprepared for the elegance of the writing and plotting, or the excellent characterisation. Highly recommended for fans of timeslip adventures of the sliding doors variety. The ebook arc copy of The First Time Lauren Pailing Died was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest opinion of the book.
9/10

Review of Witch Slapped – Book 1 of Witchless in Seattle by Dakota Cassidy #Brainfluffbookreview #WitchSlappedbookreview

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I’d just finished a very intense, if riveting read and wanted something I could relax and have a giggle with, when I saw this one pop up on my Kindle…

What’s a girl to do when she’s a broke, shunned ex-witch with a very tiny, very hungry bat familiar named Belfry to feed? Hello. My name is Stevie Cartwright, and I’ve been witchless for thirty days. If only there was a support group for down-on-their-luck ex-witches who’ve had their powers slapped right out of them (literally). Just as I was licking my wounds after returning to my hometown of Ebenezer Falls, WA, and navigating my suddenly non-magical existence with the help of my familiar, the only friend I have left in the world–things got sticky.

Poor old Steve, who has a gift for helping ghosts adrift in the afterlife, got involved with helping a small scared boy with powerful angry parents, who didn’t want their domestic dirty linen to see the light of day. So she ends up witchless and down on her luck. While the writing is continually chirpy, the endless grind of struggling to make her dwindling savings go ever further came through very strongly. And if you were thinking ‘eww’ about the bat, frankly Belfry comes across more as a little ball of cotton than a nightmare creature with veined wings and repellently ugly face.

Then there’s the inevitable murder and Steve is discovered in the wrong place at the wrong time… Cassidy gets the pacing spot on in this short but perfectly formed whodunit. I like the fact there are two puzzles running alongside each other in this story – who killed poor Madame Zoltar and who – exactly – is Winterbottom? We find out by the end of this slice of the adventure why Madame Zoltar died and who was the murderer, but as for Winterbottom, Steve’s mysterious benefactor – nope. While there are a number of tantalising clues, we are left wondering exactly who he is and why he elected to assist Steve.

That’s fine, because it gives me an excuse to dive back into this entertaining series for more Steve Cartwright adventuring. Recommended for fans of paranormal cosy mysteries featuring a quirky, humorous protagonist.
8/10

Sunday Post – 9th June, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Weekly Roundup

The sharp-eyed among you will notice that it’s actually Monday – however I spent most of yesterday with my sister – and then the evening found me up a ladder, staring at a ceiling. It’s been one of those weeks where I’ve been quite busy with not a lot to show for it. We started decorating the bathroom, so I spent long, unlovely hours cleaning the tile grout before applying whitener. It’s been hard work, but the bathroom is already looking a lot better – and yesterday I put the first coat of paint on the ceiling. It’s going to be quite dark, but as the whole room is fully tiled with white tiles with a white suite, I wanted a splash of warm colour (terracotta) so it doesn’t end up looking like a mini-morgue…

Elsewhere (I seem to be spending a LOT of time in the smallest room in the house…) I was back to Northbrook for my last term running my Creative Writing course, enjoying spending more time with my lovely students. On Thursday, Tim ended up at my house for his lesson as reboarding the loft at his home meant everything was upside down – not conducive to concentrating on his English lesson. The work in the garden has halted due to the rain and wind that swept in. Yesterday, I met up with my sister and went for a late breakfast together to put the world to rights – and finally got back home at 4 pm…

Last week I read:

How To Twist a Dragon’s Tale AUDIOBOOK – Book 5 of How To Train Your Dragon by Cressida Cowell
The heat is on for Hiccup as he is called to save the day once again. Someone has stolen the Fire-Stone. Now that the volcano on Volcano Island has become active, the tremors are hatching the eggs of the Exterminator dragons! Can Hiccup return the Fire-Stone to the Volcano, stop it from erupting, and save the Tribes from being wiped out by the terrible sword-claws of the Exterminators?
I read this with Oscar a while ago, but listening to the audio version with David Tennant’s wonderful narration is such a treat and makes working in the bathroom so much more fun…

 

Children No More – Book 4 of the Jon and Lobo series by Mark L. Van Name
No child should ever be a soldier. Jon Moore knew that better than most, having learned to fight to survive before he’d hit puberty. So when a former comrade, Alissa Lim, asks for his help in rescuing a group of children pressed into service by rebels on a planet no one cares to save, he agrees. Only later does he realize he’s signed up to do far more than he’d ever imagined.
Unsurprisingly, this slice of the Jon and Lobo series is quite a bit darker than the other books – but that didn’t stop me yet again, really enjoying the adventures befalling this quirky team of an ex-mercenary soldier and a AI sentient warship.

 

Lady of Magick – Book 2 of the Noctis Magicae series by Sylvia Hunter
In her second year of studies at Merlin College, Oxford, Sophie Marshall is feeling alienated among fellow students who fail to welcome a woman to their ranks. So when her husband, Gray, is invited north as a visiting lecturer at the University in Din Edin, they leap at the chance. There, Sophie’s hunger for magical knowledge can finally be nourished. But soon, Sophie must put her newly learned skills to the test. I thoroughly enjoyed the first book, Queen of Midnight, particularly the alternate history where pagan religions still prosper in a Regency period, where the UK is still divided into small kingdoms. This adventure took the story forward in an intriguing way and I look forward to discovering how the consequences play out in the next book.

 

Truckers AUDIOBOOK– Book 1 of the Bromeliad Trilogy by Terry Pratchett
Under the floorboards of the Store is a world of four-inch-tall nomes that humans never see. It is commonly known among these nomes that Arnold Bros. created the Store for them to live in, and he declared: “Everything Under One Roof.” Therefore there can be no such thing as Outside. It just makes sense. That is, until the day a group of nomes arrives on a truck, claiming to be from Outside, talking about Day and Night and Snow and other crazy legends…
This was one I’d read to my own children another lifetime ago – so was delighted to catch up once again with Masklin and the intrepid nomes who take on a world so much bigger than the one they were designed for…

 

Just William: William’s Treasure Trove AUDIOBOOK by Richmal Crompton
It’s the beginning of the summer holidays and William and the Outlaws see an endless expanse of gloriously carefree days stretching ahead – but how to fill them …? The six classic adventures contained in this unabridged reading are: “William and the Holiday Centre”; “William’s Treasure Trove”; “William and the Cottage”; “William Tackles the Job”; “William and Detective Journalism”; and, “William and the Parsons’ Guy”.
I used to love listening to Martin Jarvis read the Just William series on Radio 4, so this collection of short stories was a real bonus as I scrubbed away at the grout…

 

 

My posts last week:

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Rough Magic: Riding the world’s wildest horse race by Lara Prior-Palmer

Friday Faceoff featuring The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Across the Void by S.K. Vaughn

Review of The Sudden Appearance of Hope by Claire North

Sunday Post – 2nd June 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Joe Orton’s LOOT Opens Odyssey’s 50th Anniversary ‘Circa ʼ69’ Season
https://www.broadwayworld.com/los-angeles/article/Joe-Ortons-LOOT-Opens-Odysseys-50th-Anniversary-Circa-69-Season-20190516 I have been following this one with great interest – seeing as my son is playing Hal – and would love to be able to see it. It’s going well and he is thoroughly enjoying himself.

5 New Poetry Books to Watch Out For https://librarystaffpicks.wordpress.com/2019/06/05/5-new-poetry-books-to-watch-out-for/ As ever, this award-winning library site is providing informative information on the latest books to hit their shelves…

Inevitability of Science Fiction Movements https://rosieoliver.wordpress.com/2019/06/07/inevitability-of-science-fiction-movements/ Scientist and science fiction author often has thought-provoking articles on what is happening with science fiction…

A Snapshot of my Writing Process https://writerunboxed.com/2019/06/07/a-snapshot-of-my-writing-process/ As a writer, I’m always fascinated by other writers’ writing processes – and I would think readers are also intrigued to discover how their favourite books are crafted…

Book Addiction Tag https://comfortreads13.wordpress.com/2019/06/07/book-addiction-tag/ While I was interested in reading what Jess had to say in response to these excellent questions – I also found myself putting in my own answers, too. How did you get on?

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week…

Friday Faceoff – …like a garden needs a flower, like a castle needs a tower… #FridayFaceoff #Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we get to feature our FAVOURITE FANTASY covers, so I’ve selected a series of covers which I consider to be awesome by DAW for the Green Rider series by Kristen Britain.

 

This edition of Green Rider was produced by DAW on 4th November, 2008. Isn’t it breathtaking? It gives me goosebumps and a zing of pleasure every time I look at it… And yes… I’m sure the title and author fonts get lost in thumbnail – in fact I know they do. But I really don’t care – because… look at that fabulous horse. Just look…

 

Published in on 3rd April 2004 by DAW, First Rider’s Call is the second book in this series which has again another fabulous cover, featuring another stunning piece of artwork featuring another beautiful winged horse.

 

This edition of the third book in the series, The High King’s Tomb, published by DAW on 6th November 2007 is another beautiful effort. Enough said, really…

 

Produced by DAW on 1st February 2011, this is their cover design for Blackveil – the fourth book in the series. And no – I’m not going to choose between these. I love them all…

 

This edition of the fifth book in the series, Mirror Sight, this time published by Gollancz on 14th March 2015, continues with more Pegasus wondrousness. I’m a bit sad that DAW, who began these awesome covers at this point reverted to something more ordinary, leaving Gollancz to continue to be the standard-bearer for these stunning examples.

 

And last, but by no means least, is the final book in the series, Firebrand, produced by Gollancz on 9th March 2017. Yet again, just a joy to look at… What do you think of my all-time favourite fantasy covers?

 

Review of KINDLE Ebook Within the Sanctuary of Wings – Book 5 of The Memoirs of Lady Trent by Marie Brennan #Brainfluffbookreview #WithintheSanctuaryofWingsbookreview #2019TheBacklistReaderChallenge

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It’s been far too long since I finished the fourth book in this series, In the Labyrinth of Drakes – and I realised that I had been putting off completing this series simply because I didn’t want all the fun to stop. However, all good things must come to an end…

After nearly five decades (and, indeed, the same number of volumes), one might think they were well-acquainted with the Lady Isabella Trent–dragon naturalist, scandalous explorer, and perhaps as infamous for her company and feats of daring as she is famous for her discoveries and additions to the scientific field. And yet–after her initial adventure in the mountains of Vystrana, and her exploits in the depths of war-torn Eriga, to the high seas aboard The Basilisk, and then to the inhospitable deserts of Akhia–the Lady Trent has captivated hearts along with fierce minds. This concluding volume will finally reveal the truths behind her most notorious adventure–scaling the tallest peak in the world, buried behind the territory of Scirland’s enemies–and what she discovered there, Within the Sanctuary of Wings.

The other issue, of course, is after whisking us around the world, where Lady Trent endured desert, biting cold and torrid jungle in her search for knowledge about the various species of dragons, would this latest adventure managed to measure up to the previous cracking reads? The answer is yes. Now at a stage in her career where her exploits have given her a worldwide reputation, Lady Trent still is not wholly accepted within the scientific circles of Scirland. So while she is constantly in touch with fellow academics, corresponding around the world on the subject of dragons and respected as a leading authority, she is also becoming increasingly restless. Those of you who have read any of these books won’t find it a huge surprise that when reports of the remains of a completely new species come to her attention, she quickly organises an expedition to travel to the inhospitable range of mountains where this frozen corpse was last seen.

I love Lady Trent. She is the embodiment of a host of plucky Victorian ladies who ventured across the globe in long skirts and boned stays on a variety of scientific expeditions that subsequently were often erased from history. Brennan, by now knows her heroine very well, so we can relax into the adventure that befalls her – Lady T is something of a disaster magnet – which also takes the whole series into a completely different direction.

Does this final adventure adequately bring this whole series to a satisfactory conclusion? Oh yes – I thought this culmination of Lady T’s eventful life of scientific exploration was very well handled. If you haven’t yet had the pleasure of reading this delightful series and enjoy the opportunity to read a different sort of book about dragonkind, then this one comes highly recommended. Whatever you do, though, don’t start with this book – go back to the beginning of the series and pick up A Natural History of Dragons see my review here. I only wish that I was also able to turn the page and experience the pleasure of the first book for the first time, again.
10/10

Friday Faceoff – Fire burn and cauldron bubble… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is MAGICAL THINGS, so I’ve selected A Discovery of Witches – Book 1 of the All Souls Trilogy by Deborah Harkness, despite the fact that only two of my covers feature anything remotely magical – those runes and the grimoire…

 

This edition was produced by Viking Penguin in February 2011 and is clearly the default cover. I really like the graduated night sky as a backdrop and the iconic Oxford cityscape and well as the effectively eye-catching title font with that enjoyable flourish on the A. However, there are some decisions that have compromised the impact of this classy effort. Why all that chatter had to be crammed under the author is a mystery – why can’t it go on the back cover, along with the blurb? And plonking the Penguin right by the rune seems a bizarre move. Instead of focusing on the book, I found myself wondering why the logo wasn’t tucked neatly right in the bottom left or right-hand corner as is more usual…

 

Published in February 2011 by Headline, this cover is set during the day, though still featuring the cityscape, especially the Bodleian. Instead of magical runes, this time there is a red aura/magical miasma wafting across the sky. The less cluttered approach works better and though I’m not sure I prefer this design, I do think this cover has more eye appeal than the previous one.

 

This edition, published by Headline in September 2011, has done away with Oxford as part of the backdrop and this time around has gone for a matt black background with that red magical aura wisping across the cover. The author’s name nearly disappears in thumbnail, given the dark red doesn’t exactly ping off the background. This generic approach is a disappointment, especially compared to the previous two covers.

 

Produced by Orbit in May 2011, this French edition takes a completely different tack. The monochrome colours work well and I’m pleased to see Oxford feature once again. However, I think the silhouetted girl looks far too young and uncertain to be Diana Bishop. Given this is set in 2009, what is she doing wearing a mini-skirt?

 

This Croatian edition, published in 2011 is my favourite. I love the fact we are right in the middle of Oxford, right outside the Bodleian library in the middle of the night. And right in the foreground is the book that kicks off this story, pages fluttering and moonlit… So cool and appropriate. Which is your favourite?

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Poison Song – Book 3 of The Winnowing Flame Trilogy by Jen Williams #Brainfluffbookreview #ThePoisonSongbookreview

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I have thoroughly enjoyed the ongoing adventure in this excellent trilogy – read my reviews of The Ninth Rain and The Bitter Twins. The progression of this story, taking it from a straight epic fantasy adventure into a science fiction mash-up was masterfully handled, as are the steady revelations of new twists about aspects that we previously understood to be facts…

The very nature of the way Williams crafts her books makes it unlikely that you will be able to fully enjoy what is going on unless you read them in order – and as those of you who are regular visitors to my site know, I habitually crash midway into series without turning a hair. However, I wouldn’t want to make such a move with this series and strongly recommend that you don’t attempt it.

Jump on board a war beast or two with Vintage, Noon and Tor and return to Sarn for the last installment of this epic series where the trio must gather their forces and make a final stand against the invading Jure’lia.

And that’s the blurb. It won’t make much sense if you haven’t already read the previous books… I had thought that this final episode wouldn’t be able to deliver yet more surprises about the key figures in this full-on adventure – but I was wrong. We learn a lot more about the winnowing flame through Noon, the rebellious young fell-witch whose actions deeply affect those similarly cursed or gifted, depending on your viewpoint… And once more, Hestillion and the Queen of the Jure’lia manage to shock and repel me by their actions. I’ve grown very fond of all the characters in this adventure over the duration of this series – but for me, it’s Vintage who is my absolute favourite.

So… given that the first two books were so very good – has this finale lived up to expectations? Oh yes. Once more, we are immediately whisked right up into the middle of the action, so I’d also recommend that if you read The Bitter Twins a while ago and can’t quite recall exactly what is going on – flit back and remind yourself of who is doing what to whom – Williams doesn’t give you much breathing space before plunging you back into the thick of the plot.

In amongst all the mayhem, the recurring theme is about identity. Are we who we are because of what befalls us, or because of our genetic heritage? I was interested to note that Williams answers this question quite firmly by the end – and I was also interested to see which side of that discussion she favours. Not that the plot drifts off as this is discussed in any way – there simply isn’t room in amongst all the world-changing battles and soul-searing adventures.

As I don’t want to give away any spoilers, my comments regarding the unfolding story are necessarily vague, but I can report that the handling of the pacing, the conclusion of all the main character arcs and the climactic final battle is brilliantly done. I loved the bittersweet nature of the ending, though I was a tad devastated by the outcome regarding one of the main characters. And finished this one feeling a bit shattered, uplifted and with a lump in my throat. That doesn’t happen to me all that often, these days. But despite the fact that I have over half of 2019 still to run – I know I have just completed reading one of my outstanding reads of the year. While I obtained an arc of The Poison Song from Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
10/10