Category Archives: fantasy

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Poison Song – Book 3 of The Winnowing Flame Trilogy by Jen Williams #Brainfluffbookreview #ThePoisonSongbookreview

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I have thoroughly enjoyed the ongoing adventure in this excellent trilogy – read my reviews of The Ninth Rain and The Bitter Twins. The progression of this story, taking it from a straight epic fantasy adventure into a science fiction mash-up was masterfully handled, as are the steady revelations of new twists about aspects that we previously understood to be facts…

The very nature of the way Williams crafts her books makes it unlikely that you will be able to fully enjoy what is going on unless you read them in order – and as those of you who are regular visitors to my site know, I habitually crash midway into series without turning a hair. However, I wouldn’t want to make such a move with this series and strongly recommend that you don’t attempt it.

Jump on board a war beast or two with Vintage, Noon and Tor and return to Sarn for the last installment of this epic series where the trio must gather their forces and make a final stand against the invading Jure’lia.

And that’s the blurb. It won’t make much sense if you haven’t already read the previous books… I had thought that this final episode wouldn’t be able to deliver yet more surprises about the key figures in this full-on adventure – but I was wrong. We learn a lot more about the winnowing flame through Noon, the rebellious young fell-witch whose actions deeply affect those similarly cursed or gifted, depending on your viewpoint… And once more, Hestillion and the Queen of the Jure’lia manage to shock and repel me by their actions. I’ve grown very fond of all the characters in this adventure over the duration of this series – but for me, it’s Vintage who is my absolute favourite.

So… given that the first two books were so very good – has this finale lived up to expectations? Oh yes. Once more, we are immediately whisked right up into the middle of the action, so I’d also recommend that if you read The Bitter Twins a while ago and can’t quite recall exactly what is going on – flit back and remind yourself of who is doing what to whom – Williams doesn’t give you much breathing space before plunging you back into the thick of the plot.

In amongst all the mayhem, the recurring theme is about identity. Are we who we are because of what befalls us, or because of our genetic heritage? I was interested to note that Williams answers this question quite firmly by the end – and I was also interested to see which side of that discussion she favours. Not that the plot drifts off as this is discussed in any way – there simply isn’t room in amongst all the world-changing battles and soul-searing adventures.

As I don’t want to give away any spoilers, my comments regarding the unfolding story are necessarily vague, but I can report that the handling of the pacing, the conclusion of all the main character arcs and the climactic final battle is brilliantly done. I loved the bittersweet nature of the ending, though I was a tad devastated by the outcome regarding one of the main characters. And finished this one feeling a bit shattered, uplifted and with a lump in my throat. That doesn’t happen to me all that often, these days. But despite the fact that I have over half of 2019 still to run – I know I have just completed reading one of my outstanding reads of the year. While I obtained an arc of The Poison Song from Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
10/10

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Friday Faceoff – The sun coming up every day is a story… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is A SUNRISE OR SUNSET, so I’ve selected A Hat Full of Sky – Book 2 of the Tiffany Aching series by Terry Pratchett.

 

This edition was produced by Doubleday Children’s in April 2004. I love many elements of this cover – the horde of Wee Free Men clustered on the hat… the amazing lighting where the sun is breaking behind Tiffany… the quirky font… BUT I think it’s a shame that the girl depicting Tiffany has all the charm of a burnt cauldron. Given she is one of my favourite protagonists of all time – this cover doesn’t do her justice.

 

Published in May 2005 by Corgi Children’s, this cover is my favourite. I thoroughly approve of Corgi’s decision to feature those amazing Wee Free men, who have captured a witch’s hat. I love the wonderful title font, too, which helps to convey the magic that is this delightful book.

 

This edition, published by HarperCollins in May 2004 is charming. I do love that golden sky in the background and unlike the wretched girl on the first cover, this one looks adorable. Once more those blue-skinned menaces are swarming over Tiffany’s hat, the colour nicely picked up in that blue border. I am not a huge fan of borders, but this one works. The reason why this one isn’t a contender, is those rather miserable title and author fonts.

 

Produced by Corgi Children’s in May 2005, this one is a real contender, given that it deliberately evokes the Discworld covers. The classic author and title fonts Pratchett fans grew to love give an immediate visual clue that this is another book from the Great Man. While the cartoon-like depiction of Tiffany and Mistress Tick (or is it Granny Weatherwax?) speeding away on a broomstick reinforces that impression. This one would be perfect if those little blue men featured anywhere…

 

This edition, published by Corgi Childrens in May 2017, is a completely different approach. I do enjoy this quirky treatment which looks amazing. However, the reason why this one isn’t my favourite is that the overall effect gives the impression that A Hat Full of Sky is darker than it actually is. Which is your favourite?

Review of Library book The Defiant Heir – Book 2 of the Swords and Fire series by Melissa Caruso #Brainfluffbookreview #TheDefiantHeirbookreview #LibraryLoveChallenge

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This is the sequel to The Tethered Mage – see my review – which so very nearly made my Outstanding Reads list for last year – I loved the idea that mages with their magical power needed to be contained. While it isn’t a new idea, this version where each mage has a minder who can release their power or shut it down works very well.

Across the border, the Witch Lords of Vaskandar are preparing for war. But before an invasion can begin, they must call a rare gathering of all seventeen lords to decide a course of action. Lady Amalia Cornaro knows that this Conclave might be her only chance to stifle the growing flames of war, and she is ready to make any sacrifice if it means saving Raverra from destruction. Amalia and Zaira must go behind enemy lines, using every ounce of wit and cunning they have, to sway Vaskandar from war. Or else it will all come down to swords and fire.

Thoughout the book, we stay in the viewpoint of Lady Amalia, whose mother, La Contessa, rules Raverra with a canny intelligence. Right from the beginning, Amalia knew she was destined for a life in politics, despite her interest in studying forms of magic as an academic subject. And then she inadvertently ends up in a situation where that academic interest suddenly becomes far more practical when she crosses paths with a mage with a rare but lethal talent. I think it’s a clever move to make Amalia bookish and rather shy at the start of the series – her character progression is noticeable from The Tethered Mage through to this book.

However the political crisis, where Raverra is threatened by the terrifying Witch Lords who rule Vaskandar, now needs her to represent her mother on a diplomatic mission where thousands of lives are at stake. The gathering sense of danger and sense of fear at what the Witch Lords are capable of doing, with the hideous beasts they are able to enchant, is palpable. From the first page, I was snagged by this one and found it difficult to put down. While I thoroughly enjoyed The Tethered Mage, I think The Defiant Heir is even better. The supporting cast are all well written and nicely three-dimensional – particularly Zaire and the unpredictable Kathe, who controls the crows…

The pacing is beautifully judged throughout, so that by the end I stayed up waaay later than I should to discover what happens at the end and found the conclusion completely satisfying – though leaving me with a real hankering for more from this world. Thank goodness I shan’t have to wait too long for the next book, The Unbound Empire. Highly recommended for fans of well written swords and sorcery with a splash of romance.
10/10

Friday? Nope – TUESDAY Faceoff – The pyramids were built to last ten thousand years… – Brainfluffbookblog

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Yes – I know. I’m posting this one on the wrong day! But otherwise I’d miss out taking part and I love, love, love this meme which was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is DESERT LANDSCAPES, so I’ve selected Pyramids – Book 7 of the Discworld series by the late, great Terry Pratchett.

 

This edition was produced by Corgi in July 1990. This one is my favourite by a long country mile, given that it was designed by the wonderful Josh Kirby and beautifully captures the sheer knockabout mayhem and humour of this, one of the earlier Discworld novels. Though I would give a whole lot for that textbox to disappear…

 

Published in 2008 by Harper, I suppose I should give them points for effort. At least you know this is a humorous novel by the positioning and type of font and the bright teal against the crimson background is eye-catching. You also know it’s set in Egypt. But frankly, I’m not convinced. There simply isn’t the energy and wit so evident in the previous, original cover and don’t get me started on that ugly blob…

 

This edition, published by Gollancz in January 2014, is a better effort that the previous one. I like the way the great pyramid is clearly affecting the surrounding landscape and the figure leaping up and down on the cliffs. I also very much like the way the title and author name has been handled. While I still don’t think that any of the more modern efforts come close to achieving the excellence of the Kirby cover, this at least doesn’t have me shaking my head in despair at how one of my alltime favourite series is now being packaged.

 

Produced by Piper in May 2015, this German edition has reprised the Kirby feel with this amazing camel, who looks as if he’s about to slobber all over the prospective reader as he gallops away from that lethal pyramid. I love the night-time feel, which gives a great sense of the coruscating lightning building up. My one grumble is that the font could be more playful and exciting. This one is a close contender for my favourite…

 

This Italian edition, published by Sonzogno in May 1994, is – like so many of the editions for this book – is referencing Kirby’s original artwork. I’m interested to see that in thumbnail, this title is still clearly visible. Needless to say, I really like this cover, even though the pyramid isn’t anywhere in sight. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – I thought unicorns were more… fluffy – Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is UNICORNS, so I’ve selected The Last Unicorn – Book 1 of The Last Unicorn series by Peter S. Beagle.

 

This edition was a 40th Anniversary Edition produced by Penguin Roc in July 2008. I really like this one, though I would have preferred that border to continue down the sides as well as across the top and bottom. This unicorn looks rather fragile and otherworldly, though again, my grumble is that the font is rather ordinary. You’d think a unicorn would deserve something a bit more special in the way of a title font, wouldn’t you?

 

Published in November 2015 by Conlan Press, I want to like this cover more than I do. I’m guessing a decision was made to alter the proportions of this creature so it looks more like a deer than a horse – but as far as I’m concerned, it just looks odd. I’m not thrilled about that ugly black text box looming across the top of the cover, or dreary title font either. Though the full moon and the delicate silvery half-light picking out the leaves in the hedge behind the unicorn is a delight.

 

This edition, published by Ballantine Books Inc in December 1987, is very much of its time. The blocky design with a round orange sun, lollipop-like bushes and a rather rocking-horse depiction of the unicorn is familiar territory for those of us who bought copies of Lord of the Rings around this time. While it brings back a frisson of nostalgia, I’m not particularly fond of this cover.

 

Produced by ROC Fantasy/Penguin Books in 1991, the proportions of this unicorn are definitely more pleasing and I love the delicacy of the artwork. The winding stream and wilderness providing the setting for the magical creature is beautifully executed. I also like the flourishes on the title font and the fact there isn’t any pesky text box, though I could have done with less chatter across the top of that lovely artwork.

 

This Finnish edition, published by Wsoy in 1994, is my favourite. This unicorn not only looks beautiful, she also looks powerful. I love that dramatic sky as the sun sets behind the Disney castle and the clever way the light is bouncing off the unicorn, emphasising her outline. That uprooted tree in the foreground and that setting sun underlines the sense of something precious disappearing. If I had to change anything, it would be the rather dreary font – but I can’t have everything and this is the cover I think is the most successful. Which is your favourite?

Review of INDIE Ebook Bloodfire – Book 1 of the Blood Destiny series by Helen Harper #Brainfluffbookreview #Bloodfirebookreview

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I’ve read and enjoyed Helen Harper’s books before, having thoroughly enjoyed The Lazy Girl’s Guide to Magic series – see my review of Slouch Witch. So when I saw this offering on my Kindle, I tucked in…

Mack might be, to all intents and purposes, a normal looking human, but she lives with a pack of shapeshifters in Cornwall in rural England after being dumped there by her mother when she was just a young child. She desperately wants to be accepted by her surrogate family, not least because a lot of them hate her for merely being human, but for some reason her blood just won’t allow the transformation to occur.

That’s the first half of a rather chatty blurb and my advice would be not to read it as it gives away too many of the first plotpoints. Mack is certainly short-fused. All sorts of things make her angry, some justifiably and some not so much. Do be warned, though, part of her annoyance is expressed in her colourful swearing. I enjoyed her as a protagonist, as her determination to learn to fight well and her loyalty to her alpha are laudable – I also liked her glorious disregard for rules, which makes entire sense once we realise exactly what is going on. I also enjoyed the world and the setting. Cornwall is one of my favourite places in the world and while we weren’t overwhelmed with details of the countryside, there was sufficient for me to be able to clearly visualise what is going on.

While I’ve read a fair few shape-shifter stories over the years, it’s not my go-to genre but I really liked the world depicted, where mages and shapeshifters don’t like or trust each other very much. It’s a world, indeed, where the Lord Alpha, who rules the Brethren, responsible enforcing law and order amongst the shapeshifters, is regarded with dread throughout the community. No one wants to come to his attention…

Unsurprisingly, Mack does. The story cracks on with plenty of action, some enjoyable snark which mostly is generated by Mack’s chippy personality and an interesting cast of supporting characters. I loved Julia and would have liked to know more about her backstory, too. The only main niggle I had was that I got to a point where Mack’s obliviousness to the real situation became rather annoying. I wholly accept her ability not to see what is in front of her nose – I’ve watched people all my life manage to ignore the blindingly obvious – but it did impinge on my enjoyment as I kept waiting for that particular shoe to drop and for the purposes of the overall pacing, I think it went on just a tad too long.

Overall though, this paranormal shapeshifting adventure was an entertaining page-turner and I shall definitely be getting hold of the next book, Bloodmagic.
8/10

Review of KINDLE Ebook Dreamer’s Pool – Book 1 of Blackthorn and Grim series by Juliet Marillier #Brainfluffbrainreview #Dreamer’sPoolbookreview

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I love Juliet Marillier’s writing – the Sevenwaters series is outstanding and I also very much enjoyed The Dark Mirror – see my review here. So when I realised Himself had treated himself to this offering, I tucked in.

In exchange for help escaping her long and wrongful imprisonment, embittered magical healer Blackthorn has vowed to set aside her bid for vengeance against the man who destroyed all that she once held dear. Followed by a former prison mate, a silent hulk of a man named Grim, she travels north to Dalriada. There she’ll live on the fringe of a mysterious forest, duty bound for seven years to assist anyone who asks for her help.

I enjoyed this book, particularly that fantastic opening section. This classic fantasy romance has one major difference – the main protagonist isn’t a princess, or any other member of the royal family. She is an older woman with a terrible past, who now has been freed – on condition that she turns her back on her dreams for vengeance and always provides help if someone asks. In this medieval era fantasy, where clearly women have very limited options – she also has agency as a skilled healer, so she can rebuild her life. It’s made a lot easier by the presence of her companion, the hulking man who had occupied the cell next to hers, called Grim. He also has a dark past and is possessed of great strength and a strong work ethic – and has latched onto Blackthorn, after witnessing her temperament under the most dehumanising conditions. A word of warning – this book starts in a prison where the inmates are treated with brutality and while there is nothing graphic, there are two incidents of rape in this book.

The other protagonist is an unworldly prince, determined to marry for love in an age when dynastic and territorial concerns decide who you walk up the aisle with. He starts writing to a young woman who, it turns out, loves books and poetry as much as he does – and it’s all going swimmingly… until she takes a swim.

The romance bubbles alongside Blackthorn’s far more dramatic storyline, until it gathers momentum and near the end of the book, takes precedence as the conclusion of this story wraps up the whole narrative. Though this isn’t a ‘happily ever after’ tale – there are winners, but there are also significant losers and my sympathy does go out to the major loser. I would also add that I was a bit disturbed that a woman being sexually active was depicted as a negative attribute. It’s not a dealbreaker, and I’m conscious that faithful, chaste womanhood is part of the genre convention in classical fantasy – but this is the 21st century and I am a bit disappointed that this was used as a device to point up the female character’s unsuitability.

However, it doesn’t take away from the fact that this is a well-written, entertaining story and if it didn’t quite deliver the promise of that fabulous opening, it is still an engrossing, page-turning adventure.
7/10

Friday Faceoff – The moon lives in the lining of your skin… Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is SHAPESHIFTERS, so I’ve selected a book from a cracking series I very much enjoyed – World’s End – Book 1 of the Age of Misrule by Mark Chadbourn.

 

This edition was produced by Millennium in September 2000 – and it was this cover that prompted me to pick this one off the shelves. I love it. That glorious dragon suddenly appearing in the middle of the M4 in the path of a speeding car. The lighting… the rain reflecting the amazing image off the tarmac… a modern landscape in the background… the coruscating light flickering in the sky where the dragon has made his entrance… I think this is a masterful cover and it’s one of my all-time favourites.

 

Published in April 2010 by Pyr, this is another fabulous cover. If I hadn’t already given my heart to the dragon-themed cover above, this would certainly have been my favourite. The sheer threat and majesty of the magnificent being is so well depicted against the appalled figures silhouetted against that lurid green aura… I also love the title font, which works wonderfully well and holds its own with that amazing image.

 

On any other day, against normal covers, this effort would probably be my favourite. I love the image of the leaping dragon on this Polish edition, published by Wydawnictwo Dolnośląskie in May 2006. The sheer vicious anger on that dragon face snarling out at us is sufficient to snag my attention – and I also love the beautiful slice of the wing and the way the title is nested within the image – but not quite enough to make this one my favourite…

 

Produced in June 2011, this French edition has gone for a feeling of menace, with the encroaching darkness held back by the small bubble of light over Stonehenge – what a clever choice for a symbol of ancient Britain – and our group of plucky protagonists silhouetted against that light, with an ominous red moon rising… Very cleverly done and far more understated than the previous efforts. Sadly, I’m not a subtle soul and prefer the clamour and excitement of dragons – because they’re – well, DRAGONS, baby!

 

This German edition, published by Feder & Schwert in July 2011, takes an entirely different tack and is another excellent example. The fossilised remains of the dragon, all picked out in glorious shades of gold and yellow, draws the eye. I love the slight spatter of blood – as well as giving extra visual drama, it also provides unanswered questions for the prospective reader… The designer has also taken time to consider how to include the textual matter within the artwork, which is fabulously executed. Another one that was so very nearly my favourite – which one do you prefer?

Review of The Kingdom of Copper – Book 2 of the Daevabad Trilogy by S.A. Chakraborty #Brainfluffbookreview #TheKingdomofCopperbookreview

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I was delighted when I was approved to read this one – I have a real weakness for sand and sorcery adventures…

Nahri’s life changed forever the moment she accidentally summoned Dara, a formidable, mysterious djinn, during one of her schemes. Whisked from her home in Cairo, she was thrust into the dazzling royal court of Daevabadand quickly discovered she would need all her grifter instincts to survive there. Now, with Daevabad entrenched in the dark aftermath of the battle that saw Dara slain at Prince Ali’s hand, Nahri must forge a new path for herself, without the protection of the guardian who stole her heart or the counsel of the prince she considered a friend. But even as she embraces her heritage and the power it holds, she knows she’s been trapped in a gilded cage, watched by a king who rules from the throne that once belonged to her familyand one misstep will doom her tribe.

I hadn’t read the first book and I’m sorry about that – not because I was floundering at any stage – but because this one was such a thumping good read, I wish that I had started the adventure in the right place in order to get the maximum enjoyment from it. As it was, crashing into the series in the wrong place wasn’t a problem. Chakraborty not only ensured that any previous details necessary to make sense of the story were already included, there is also a very helpful glossary and cast of characters at the back, giving helpful details of the world and the complicated rivalries that run it.

I really liked Nahri, which was important. But what particularly impressed me in this sweeping story were the inclusion of the history of bloodshed and atrocities on both sides that powered everyone’s current mindset. It was a grimly realistic take on the politics and gave an explanation for the violence perpetrated, if not the justification.

I’m aware that I have given the impression that this is a gritty book full of anger and angst. While there is plenty of tension and plotting going on, there are also lovely descriptions of the world, and plenty of light and colour in amongst the excellent action scenes. I can now see what all the fuss was about regarding the first book, The City of Brass, which I will definitely be getting hold of and I look forward to also reading the final book, The Empire of Gold, in this excellent trilogy. Highly recommended for fans of sword and sorcery stories.

While I obtained an arc of The Kingdom of Copper from Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
9/10

Sunday Post – 10th March, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

And here I am a whole month after my last Sunday Post. It’s been a difficult one. During half term I had a bad reaction to my blood pressure medication and am in the process of waiting for things to calm down before the Dr begins another treatment. I cannot speak highly enough of the fine folk in the NHS, who have been nothing but prompt, professional and kindly – such a relief to feel I’m in capable hands.

But what that did was bring forward a decision that I’d been considering for a while. So when I returned to Northbrook after the half term break, I tendered my resignation as Creative Writing tutor to take effect as from the end of the summer term. Given my health is still iffy and I am striving to step up my writing output, something has to give – while I’ve loved teaching at Northbrook College, it takes a lot of work over and above delivering the lessons and I simply need to ease up. As ever, Himself has been a rock throughout.

Other than that, Life whizzes by at its usual breakneck pace. Himself and I are attempting to clear out the loft and have made some progress by taking bagfuls of books to the charity shops. It’s made a bit of a dent… Last week we went down to Ringwood and had a lovely day with my in-laws and I spent last Sunday with my sister, which was fabulous – I haven’t seen much of her recently.

Last week I read:
Day 115 on an Alien World – Book 1 of the Settler Chronicles series by Jeanette Bedard
A dishonourable discharge left Margo unable to find honest work on Earth. Signing onto a colonizing mission heading to a new world promised a fresh start. Or at least that’s what she’d thought. Strapped into a crashing colony ship, she realized how wrong she’d been.
They hit the ground and the straight forward colonizing mission becomes a scramble for survival…
I really enjoyed this colony world thriller and will be reviewing it in due course.

 

No Going Back – Book 5 of the Jon and Lobo series by Mark L. Van Name
Haunted by memories of children he could not save, Jon Moore becomes so increasingly self-destructive that even his best friend, the hyper-intelligent Predator-Class Assault Vehicle, Lobo, is worried. So when Jon receives both a job offer and a message from a woman from his distant past, he and Lobo leap at the welcome diversions. That the job is illegal is the least of their problems. They’re happy to retrieve stolen artifacts from Jon’s quarantined home world, and their fee is high even for a job so highly illegal. The forces protecting their targets are formidable, and the assault team that’s chasing them is even more dangerous–but Jon and Lobo are used to that. The scientist Jon and Lobo need for the mission has an agenda of her own, but they’ve faced that problem before. This time, though, the knowledge that they and the others seek spells doom for Jon.
I thoroughly enjoyed the first three books in the series – and will be now tracking down the fourth one. The relationship between Jon and Lobo is both poignant and funny and I love the overarching story arc that is emerging. Review to follow.

 

Frozen in Time AUDIOBOOK by Ali Sparkes
Ben and Rachel Corder are sure they’re in for the longest, dullest summer ever, until they discover an underground vault at the bottom of their garden with an amazing secret inside – two children from the 1950s who have been asleep for decades. But waking up Freddy and Polly Emerson means unearthing the secrets that were buried with them. Why would their father leave them frozen? How is cryonic suspension even possible? Why doesn’t the world know about the process fifty years later? How will the Emersons ever fit into the 21st century world of cell phones and microwave dinners? And why does it feel like they’re all suddenly being followed?
I’d loved reading this children’s thriller to Frances years ago – and then bought her the audiobook, so when she helped me get my Kindle Fire going during half term when the grandchildren came to stay, this was the first book I wanted to listen to. It’s been great fun – and so very different to reading it. Review to follow.

My posts last week:

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Cyanide with Christie – Book 3 of the Crime with the Classics series by Katherine Bolger Hyde

Friday Face-Off featuring The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of String City by Graham Edwards

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Jonas Brothers Carpool Karoke #Jonas Brothers #James Corden http://www.fundinmental.com/jonas-brothers-carpool-karaoke/#.XIT9objgrb1 When I spotted this offering by Sherry at Fundinmental, I knew it would make this week’s cut. I love James Corden – talented and witty and very, very funny – what’s not to love?

Viking Heritage Day at Woodstown https://inesemjphotography.com/2019/03/09/viking-heritage-day-at-woodstown/ Once again, Inessa’s fabulous pics bring a slice of beauty into my life – and this time around, she’s gone time travelling…

Understanding and handling your bookworm. A guide https://thisislitblog.com/2019/03/04/understanding-and-handling-your-bookworm-a-guide/ Shruti’s funny take gives outsiders some inkling of what it is to be gripped by a passion for books.

Eagle Eyes https://storyshucker.wordpress.com/2019/03/09/eagle-eyes/ Stuart’s delightful account of a classroom incident that happened waaay back is worth a read.

New blogsitential questions https://readerwitch.com/2019/03/09/new-blogsitential-questions/ Alexandra discusses issues that we all have to face when we suddenly find the days have slid past and we’ve been too busy to post a new blog article…

Many thanks for taking the time to comment, like and visit my blog – I am so sorry about my lack of response and am aiming to try and get back on track during the next week or so. In the meantime, have a wonderful week!