Category Archives: Friday Face-off

Friday Faceoff – The ships hung in the sky, much the way that bricks don’t… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffmodernscificovers #SciFiMonth2020

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring MODERN SCI FI covers. I’ve selected Embers of War – Book 1 of the Embers of War series by Gareth L. Powell – see my mini-review. I’m linking this article with #Sci Fi Month 2020.

Titan Books, February 2020

This offering was produced by Titan Books in February 2020. This is the default cover – and I can see why. The spacescape with a planet and it’s moon having sustained a major hit of some description, with the ship trying to outrun the massive explosion, is very dramatic. Or maybe it’s the ship blowing up – but I think the reflection within the clouds and that ominous glowing within the planet surface is more likely to be a catastrophic big bang about to engulf the planet. If I have a grizzle about this one, it’s that the title font is a little underwhelming and in thumbnail it simply disappears.

Italian edition, October 2019

Published in October 2019 by Fanucci Editore, this Italian edition is my least favourite. I love the spacescape – those cool blues and again, that ominous explosion in the background, with the ship featured in the foreground. But WHAT possessed them to then stick a couple of lines across the middle of the artwork? I’ve no idea what they are supposed to signify and they are just a distractingly ugly intrusion.

French Edition, April 2019

This French edition, published by Denoël in April 2019, is another cracking cover. I love the fact that this ship is weaving its way through an asteroid belt, giving the cover a very dramatic look, with all those ominous rocks looming out of the darkness of space. And isn’t that a cool ship – it’s got some kind of pattern across the top… I also particularly like the title font, which works really well on this edition as that hot red stands out from the darker tones in the cover. This is a real contender…


Croatian edition, 2019

This Croatian edition is another wonderful offering. Published in 2019 by Hangar 7, this cover has taken the title very literally. That ship in the foreground looks as though it’s breaking up – and we can see flying embers in the upper half of the cover against the spacescape. While below the ship, there is either a suited person, or small survival capsule trying to get away from the unfolding catastrophe. I also like the cool font, which works well. Do I like this one more than the French offering, though? I cannot make up my mind!

Russian edition, August 2020

And finally there is this Russian edition, published in August 2020. Oh wow – again, something huge is exploding on the other side of the planet – look at the waves of heat coming off the surface. And in this one, we definitely have the sentient ship, Trouble Dog, featured in the foreground. For the first time ever – I simply cannot make up my mind between the final three covers. I think they are all fabulous and I’d happily pick any one off the shelves and hand over my hard-earned cash to get hold of the story😊. But which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – Words are free – it’s how you use them that can cost… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffwordscovers #SciFiMonth2020

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with WORDS. I’ve selected Artemis by Andy Weir and linked this post to #Sci Fi Month 2020. See my reviews of The Martian and Artemis.

Crown, November 2017

This hardcover edition was produced by Crown in November 2017. To be honest, I think it’s just dreary. The story is a foot-to-the floor thriller set on the Moon. And with all the black, black, blacketty black going on, I don’t think you’d know it. Worse – in thumbnail both the author and title fonts simply disappear. I think this cover fails on almost every level.

Ballantine, July 2018

Published in July 2018 by Ballantine, at least this grey effort gives us an idea of the Moon. And though I’m not sure exactly why it’s there, I quite like the orange strip running down the length of the cover. Though perhaps I’m just craving something – anything else, other than GREY.

Del Rey, November 2017

At least this edition, published by Del Rey in November 2017, is an improvement over the previous miserable offerings. Though I can’t help thinking the girl staring out at us through her space helmet is a not-very-subtle reminder that this is the author of The Martian, given that one of the default covers was Matt Damon was gazing at us. And just in case we missed that allusion, there is lump of blurb telling us. Which has ruined this one for me.

Russian edition, December 2017

This Russian edition, produced by ACT in December 2017, is more like it! I love this image of the Moon, limned around the edge by the Sun. It is glorious and gives a wonderful pop of colour and excitement. And there is also a cool spaceship in the foreground… While I could have done without the MUST READ docket hanging off the ship exhaust, this is my favourite cover by a long light year.

Lithuanian edition, August 2019


This Lithuanian edition, published by BALTO leidybos namai in August 2019 is also a better effort than the top two miserable efforts. I like the figure against the craters of the Moon, though the scale and detail is slightly puzzling. And I definitely like the title running down the centre of the cover in red lettering. But which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – A bright future beckons… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffbrightfuturecovers #SciFiMonth2020

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring BRIGHT FUTURISTIC covers. I’ve selected Synners by Pat Cadigan – see my review – and I’ve linked this post to #Sci Fi Month 2020

Thunder’s Mouth Press, October 2001

This edition was produced by Thunder’s Mouth Press in October 2001. It’s a really clever, eye-catching cover with the face in the bottom half nicely contrasting with that intense red above it. And a mushroom cloud effect made by a brain… So this cover works on all sorts of levels with this classic book. I particularly love the title font running right up the centre of cover and through the mushroom cloud/brain – and the fact that it is made of dots – a bit like one of the earlier printers.

Gollancz, 2012

Published in August 2012 by Gollancz, this Masterworks edition is another successful cyberpunk cover. The cityscape outlined against the grungy yellow backdrop can also double as synapses or brain connections. While that face staring out at us looks mournful and slightly wrong. This is the cover of the book that I read, so I have a soft spot for it, memorable and disturbing as it is.

Spectra, February 1991

This edition, published by Spectra in February 1991 is so nearly my favourite. I love the colour and chaos of it – and the slightly old fashioned feel, which is achieved by the use of that large, colourful font that some of the publishers – Baen, in particular – used as their trademark in the 1980s.

HarperCollins, October 1991

This hardcover edition, produced by HarperCollins in October 1991, is my favourite. It’s a classier version of the second cover, playing with the same theme. I love the unusual aspect of the face tilted back as if the character is sunk into a VR trance. The lines running from the cyberscape up, across her neck and face pull your attention back to it, and create stronger links between the two. I particularly love the detail where it looks as though her face is starting to depixelate across her forehead. Again, this cover works on so many levels.

Polish edition, March 2003

This Polish edition, published by Solaris in March 2003 was the one that popped into my head when I thought of bright covers. It is great fun, but I don’t like it quite as much as the others. That ugly box in the right-hand cover, in particular, really spoils the look of the overall design and neither am I a fan of the rather clunky text box across the top of the cover. What about you – which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – It’s a fixer-upper of a planet, but we could make it work… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffplanetcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with PLANETS. I’ve selected Children of Time – Book 1 of the Children of Time duology by Adrian Tchaikovsky – see my review. I have linked this post to #Sci Fi Month 2020.

PanMacmillan, June 2015

This is the default cover and was produced by PanMacmillan in June 2015. I really love this cover – it would have caught my eye, even if I wasn’t a huge fan of the author, as I’m always a sucker for spacescapes. And this one has it all… an interesting ship, something clearly going on between the ship and the planet, with lovely lighting effects. The font is well balanced and genre appropriate, although I do think the author name could pack a bit more punch. The only grizzle I have, is that line of blurb plopped in the middle of the design, which I think distracts and detracts from the overall image.

Italian edition, February 2018

Published in February 2018, by Italian publisher Fannucci, this is another cool spacescape. However, the title font is rather overpowering – to the extent that it’s difficult to see the cover behind it. I think it could be both smaller and less chunky and will be clearly visible, while also allowing us to see more of that planet and spaceship.

Polish edition, July 2017

This Polish edition, published in July 2017 by Rebis actually takes us down to the planet surface. I’m not quite sure about this… the way the book is written and structured, that depiction on the cover is a huge spoiler. That said – I’d love to think the artist is giving their view of Portia, who absolutely rocks😊. It isn’t my favourite, but it is an interesting departure, as all the other covers choose to depict the ship.

Latvian edition, December 2018

Published by Prometejs in December 2018, this Latvian edition is another one showing us the spaceship and the planet. It’s a rather beautiful rendition. The colouring of the planet surface is lovely. I really like the way the blue glow surrounding the planet is picked up by the approaching spaceship. This gives the cover a pleasing symmetry, as the title font appears in the centre, between the planet and ship. This is a strong contender – I so nearly went for this one…

French edition, April 2018

This French edition, published in April 2018 by Denoël, is my favourite by a whisker. I like the fact we are looking down on the both the planet, and the ship orbiting it. Like the default cover, this one manages to inject a sense of visual drama by the use of light. I also like the fact there are actual stars in the spacescape – it’s a relatively small detail, but it makes all the difference. But for me, the decider is that visual clue about what is actually happening on the planet – so clever and subtle. However, if you’ve read the book and know what I’m talking about – it’s immediately apparent. While I like this one best, which one do you prefer?







Friday Faceoff – Let’s take our hearts for a walk in the woods… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffforestcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with FORESTS OR JUNGLES. I’ve selected Hatchet – Book 1 in the Brian’s Saga series by Gary Paulsen.

Atheneum Books for Young Readers, April 2000

This offering was produced by Atheneum Books for Young Readers in April 2000, but as it is one of the default covers for this successful book, over the years a number of publishers have used this design. I can see why – the young protagonist is featured on the cover with the thick Canadian wilderness in the background and the hatchet featured as an overlay. The blocky treatment of the artwork ensures that it stays eye-catching even when in thumbnail and the blue title font is still readable. That said, I don’t particularly love it – and it isn’t the cover that induced me to buy the book for my son, when he was a struggling reader and I was trying to encourage him to persevere.

Simon Schuster Books, December 2006

Published in December 2006 by Simon Schuster Books for Young Readers, this is the cover that came to mind when I saw this week’s FF theme. And the one on the cover of the book I bought my son all those years ago, as this is the other default cover. I love the forested landscape with the hatchet superimposed across it. It gives a sense of the scale of poor Brian’s plight in a way I don’t think the other one does. I also prefer the punchy title and author font. What I don’t like is that nasty silver blob that detracts from the overall design. Just look at the two covers without the blob and you can see the entirety of the designs and much better they look. This one is so nearly my favourite.

Simon Pulse, December 2006

This edition, published in December 2006 by Simon Pulse books, has flipped the previous design into night-time mode – and what a difference it makes to the tone and mood of the book. I love it and think it is beautiful – but that’s why this one isn’t getting my vote. This cover sings out paranormal shapeshifter to me – which is completely the wrong genre.

Macmillan Children’s Books, 1996

This edition, published in 1996 by Macmillan Children’s Books, is a stunning cover. The hatchet isn’t being used to chop wood, or build shelters – a desperate Brian is using the hatchet to make fire… I love this one. It’s eye-catching, beautiful and absolutely sums up the struggle for survival. The notch in this blade is apparently designed for a ‘hardcore survivalist hatchet, underlining that this is probably the different between life and death for Brian. This one is my favourite.

Pan Macmillan UK, March 2017

This 30th Anniversary edition, published by Pan Macmillan UK in March 2017, is another fabulous cover. The huge grizzly, with the isolated landscape and the small plane flying against a setting sun is stunningly beautiful. I don’t like to nitpick – though I’m going to anyway – but I don’t recall this book being allll about a grizzly bear called Hatchet. And I think that’s the impression you might come away with, when you see this cover. Or perhaps, because it’s the anniversary edition of a much-loved book, the publishers figured most people buying it would know the basic story. But I don’t think that’s an assumption publishers can afford to make. What do you think?


Friday Faceoff – No one can be a hero without the heart being torn open… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceofftorncovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with something TORN.

I’ve selected How To Break a Dragon’s Heart – Book 8 of the How To Train a Dragon series by Cressida Cowell.

August 2009

This offering was produced in August 2009 – though I cannot find out who published this edition. I really like it. The large red dragon, surrounded by the forest with the huge moon in the sky is a scene from the book and makes an attractive, eye-catching cover. But there’s a dealbreaker here. The title and author fonts are displayed clearly and in a suitably quirky style – but NOT the series number! Given there are twelve books in this series, and they all follow on, one from the other, so need to be read in the right order – this is a real issue. We got muddled, thanks to this omission and ended up reading a couple of the books the wrong way around – and yes, it spoilt it for Oscar, who hasn’t gone back and properly completed the series.

Little, Brown Books for Children, November 2011

Published in November 2011, by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, this is another attractive, eye-catching offering. Poor old Hiccup being held in the palm of the Dragon Furious doesn’t look all that comfortable – and I rather like the fact that a series initially aimed at young boys features a pink background. Even more importantly, this edition has the series number clearly displayed.

Hodder Children’s, June 2017

This edition, published in June 2017 by Hodder Children’s books, is the cover that came to mind when I was searching for TORN covers. I love this one – the ripped section showing the huge dragon on the other side of the rather battered covering. Cowell initially wanted the covers to look rather scruffy and blotted, as so many boys cannot produce neat tidy work. Hence the spattered, rather scribbly nature of the drawings inside… But, despite loving the design, I’m not choosing it. Because book covers should aid the reading experience by giving all the necessary information. And this one doesn’t fulfil the brief.

German edition, March 2016

This German edition, published in March 2016 by Arena Verlag, is my least favourite. It’s not that there is anything particularly wrong with it, other than it reminds me far too much of the vanilla film franchise, where Hiccup is cool and good-looking, with Toothless as a special, rare dragon and he has a little group of admirers who generally follow his escapades. So unlike the books and the ethos behind them – where Hiccup is one of the awkward, nerdy kids that regularly gets bullied by Snotlout and his gang. And Toothless is constantly naughty and far too small to ride. But I can’t deny that it is an attractive cover, if rather generic.

Russian edition, 2015

This Russian edition, published by Азбука, Азбука-Аттикус in 2015, is my favourite. I love the look in the dragon’s eyes as Hiccup offers him his freedom. Part amusement, part contempt, part loathing… And all the relevant, important information is suitably displayed. I also like the slight grubbiness of the background – this isn’t supposed to be a book that looks too shiny and finished. What about you – which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – When spider webs unite, they can tie up a lion… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffspiderwebscovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with SPIDER WEBS. I’ve selected Wintersmith – Book 3 of the Tiffany Aching series and Book 35 of the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett.

Corgi Childrens, July 2010

This edition was produced by Corgi Childrens in July 2010. This is the cover that caused me to choose it for this theme, given that the scene is swathed in spider webs. I do have a soft spot for this cover as it is the one I have on my own copy of the book – and given that this story holds a special place in my heart, I have a real fondness for it. But it isn’t my favourite.

HarperTempest, October 2006

Published in October 2006 by HarperTempest, this is another strong contender. I really like it – the snowflakes make an attractive addition and the fact we don’t see Tiffany’s face gives it a sense of mystery and allows me to continue with my own imagined appearance for one of my favourite young protagonists. I’m also delighted that one of the Nac Mac Feegle makes an appearance. When my grandson was reading this series, ‘Crivens!’ became a favourite family exclamation…

Corgi Childrens, September 2007

This edition, published by Corgi Childrens in September 2007, is my favourite. It encapsulates the style of the original Discworld covers – and again we have three of the main Nac Mac Feegle warriors – Rob Anybody, Daft Wullie and Big Yan. I love the font and overall design. And while I’m aware that Pratchett’s name doesn’t appear to be very visible – it is highly likely to be embossed, seeing as it is on all our covers.

HarperCollins, September 2015

This edition, produced by HarperCollins in September 2015 is the only one not featuring any of the colourful characters from the story. But nonetheless, it is an attractive cover. I love the three-D effect of the title font with the green leaves twining through it and the author font is nicely balanced. The deep blue shading into the black works well with the sense of chill and coldness evoked by the title. My only misgiving is that this title doesn’t convey the humour of this story – unlike all the other designs.


Corgi Childrens, May 2017

This edition, published by Corgi Childrens in May 2017, is also a contender. I love this one. Lots of drama and movement, with a cool graphic novel treatment of Tiffany Aching on her broomstick, giving those Nac Mac Feegle a lift. The snowflakes, flowing cloak and antics of those naughty blue men provide sufficient appeal for the younger market – though this one is too good to just leave to the children. It was so nearly my favourite, but I did feel the title was just a bit too small. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – The devil is in the detail… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffdetailedcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with lots of DETAIL. I’ve selected Just One Damned Thing After Another – Book 1 of the Chronicles of St Mary’s by Jodie Taylor, see my review.

Night Shade, 2016

This offering was produced by Night Shade in June 2016 and is one of the default covers for this quirky book. It certainly features some of the elements that pack the book, though my grizzle with it is that you don’t have a clue about the madcap humour running through the book by looking at this design. Though I really like the treatment of the font – I just wish the lower half of the cover wasn’t such a dreary brown, which makes it look far too dark and forbidding.

Accent Press, September 2013

Published in September 2013 by Accent Press, this is the other default cover and the one that immediately sprang to mind when I thought of this week’s them. I know that it doesn’t look all that detailed initially, but if you look closely through the steam of that inviting cuppa, you’ll see glimpses of some of the time travel projects the St Mary’s team embark on. I love the bright colour that gives an indication of the comedy that runs through this book. Taylor is the only one of a handful of authors who I can rely on to make me both laugh and weep when reading her books. In case you didn’t already realise, this is my favourite.

Accent Press, November 2013

This edition, published in November 2013 by Accent Press is another strong contender, even though I don’t like it quite as much as the previous design. The border in this instance works well. While the design is pared right back, there is still a lot going on in this cover, though it isn’t as busy as the previous offering. It is all held together by the clever use of the black and red shading, making it eye-catching and elegant.

Accent Press, November 2013

This Kindle edition, published in November 2013 by Accent Press is another eye-catching effort. Using a blurry version of the teacup, the illustrations in the top half of the cover are more apparent in thumbnail – someone actually thought about how this one was going to look at a smaller scale, which is refreshing. And indeed, the design is far easier to decipher and stands out well. However, my preference is still for the second cover, though I think it comes down to the fact that I’ll always go for brighter colours, given a choice.

Italian edition, February 2020

This Italian edition, published by Corbaccio in February 2020, has gone for a more pared back effect, with the designer using an art deco feel, clearly trying to evoke a classic British style, as there is something manically Brit about the way St Mary’s is run. But this version is far too elegant and crisply up together. For instance, Max is far more likely to be found wearing a boiler suit, than a smart skirt. And again, the subdued shades of garnet don’t give an indication of the sheer fun of this engaging series. Which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffminimalistcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring MINIMALIST covers. I’ve selected The Hound of the Baskervilles – Book 5 of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries by Arthur Conan Doyle.

Enhanced Classics, 2014

So who knew that such a classic would be a source of such minimalist covers? But this edition, released in September 2014 by Enhanced Classics is one of a number of pared back designs that trades on our abiding affection and knowledge of this quirky detective. I really like it – though I do wonder if the dog ought to feature on the cover, given the way the fear of the beast looms throughout this tense murder mystery.

Vintage Classics, 2008

Published in September 2008 by Vintage Classics, this is another simple design. Despite the apparent simplicity, there’s quite a lot going on here. I like the graduated colour fading to black at the outer edges, which essentially puts that magnifying glass and the title in the spotlight. It’s a clever move having the snarling muzzle of the dog within the magnifying glass. The cover projects tension and menace without a splash of blood, or any garish visual tricks regarding the title. My one grumble is that I think the title could do with being less Victorian and self-effacing.

Portuguese edition 2013

This Portuguese edition, published in 2013 by Zahar, is a real gem. Again, it has used the ubiquitous silhouette of Holmes to produce the heart of the design, before adding another layer that absolutely nails this one for me. Within the shadowed outline of Holmes is the ruined house where a certain character hid, thus thoroughly throwing dear old Watson right off the scent of the real villain. And then we have the cemetery and the dog, himself… I also absolutely love the way the smoke curls up from the pipe to give us the name of the author. This is my favourite.

Marathi edition, 2012

And this Marathi edition is another example of a simple outline featuring on the cover. Published in January 2012 by Diamond Publications, the almost cartoonish creature on the trail of his prey immediately draws the eye. Again, the background is effectively shaded, pulling our attention onto the snarling beast in the centre of the cover – while that hill than provides the text box for the title and author fonts. This one was so nearly my favourite – it was the wisping smoke turning into Conan Doyle’s name on the other other contender that edged for me.

Lithuanian edition, 2013

This Lithuanian edition, published in May 2013 by Baltos Iankos, is another effective and simple cover. The shaded background allows the black outline of the dog to stand out, so although he is running more or less towards us – a difficult angle when most of the details aren’t apparent – we can make him out with no difficulty. I like the fact the designer has taken the trouble to give him a shadow, thus anchoring him to the background, instead of just plonking him onto the top of it. I do think the title font could be a bit larger and punchier, but that is a personal preference. Which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – When snow falls, Nature listens… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffsnowcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers depicting SNOW. I’ve selected Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson.

Bloomsbury, 2009

This offering, produced by Bloomsbury in 2009, is a strong image and was the reason why I chose this book. However the sense of chilly isolation is spoilt by all the chatter cluttering up the cover – and for once, I’m not a fan of the large author and title fonts as I think they overwhelm the image.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 1994

Published in September 1994 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, this is the default cover for the book, which is a real shame. The cedar forest on the side of the cliff is certainly atmospheric and it would be ideal with the title was MIST OVER CEDARS – but it’s not. The title mentions snow – and there isn’t any. Oops. But that didn’t stop a raft of other publishers adopting this cover, anyway. Worse, the title and author fonts are so small and underwhelming, so they disappear in thumbnail and aren’t all that visible when full size.

Portuguese edition, February 1998

This Portuguese edition, published in February 1998 by Relógio D’ Água, has taken a different path with a painting. It looks lovely, but I’m not a fan of the border that grows into a textbox across the top of the cover, though at least the title and author name are clearly visible.

German edition, February 2013

This German edition, published in February 2013 by Hoffmann und Campe and is clearly influenced by the default cover above, in that it is a close-up of cedar branches in the mist. At least the title and author fonts are more effective in this cover design and work well within the image, in addition to being clearly visible in thumbnail, as well as when full sized.

French edition, 1996

This French edition, published in 1996 by France loisirs, at least features snow falling – a sleeting blizzard that makes me shiver just looking at it. I’ll forgive the lack of cedars to have some snow – and a suggestion of a river in full spate with snow-shrouded branches growing over it. Though whatever they are, they’re not evergreen cedars. I think this cover is the most successful in capturing the mood of the book, as well as evoking the title. Which is your favourite?