Tag Archives: Books by Proxy

Friday Faceoff – In ancient times cats were worshipped as gods…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is cats, so I’ve chosen Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats – by T.S. Eliot.

 

This is playful cover is more than a nod to some of the earlier covers with the cartoon-like cats and cheerful colour – so much more fun than some of the other drearier offerings in the 1960s and 70s. It was produced in August 1982 by Harcourt Brace and Co., which sounds like the sort of publisher that would crop up in one of Eliot’s poems… I really like this one.

 

This edition, produced in October 2009 by HMH, is another really enjoyable cover with a number of the recognisable cats that feature in Eliot’s delightful poems. As well as being quirky and playful, this cover is attractive and eye-catching.

 

Published in 2001 by Faber and Faber, this cover continues with the bright background and cartoon cats. However, I think the whole design is spoilt by that ugly block running across the bottom of the cover for the title and author – and by 2001, they didn’t have the excuse that it was still the fashion that prevailed with covers.

 

This cover, produced by Faber and Faber in February 2014, is another strong contender. I like the madcap cat featuring behind the footlights – along with the distinctive font on the word CATS, this is more than a nod to the worldwide hit musical that came out of this collection of poems.

 

This is my favourite cover – mostly because I find it the most appealing and attractive, rather than because I think it is necessarily the best design. Produced by Faber and Faber in October 2010, I love the bright colourful design of the cats high-kicking their way across the rooftop. It may lack the quirkiness of some of the other covers, but the bold colours and well balanced title font sells this one for me. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – My guitar is not a thing. It is an extension of myself. (Joan Jet)

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is guitars, so I’ve chosen Soul Music – Book 16 of the Discworld series by the late, great Terry Pratchett.

 

This is the go-to cover, as far as I’m concerned. Produced in September 1995 by Corgi, it is certainly the cover of my copy of Soul Music – funny, anarchic and brimful of movement and madcap detail, but with more than a hint of darkness. While I’m not a fan of solid panels of colour for the title and author name, this probably just about manages to get by without messing up the artwork too much.

 

 

This edition, produced in May 2003 by HarperTorch starts off well enough. I rather like the quirky font and eye-catching red background. I’m a tad more dubious about the record, but the depiction of Susan is when the cover becomes unacceptably inaccurate. Since when did Terry write her as some curvy bimbette who pouts at us over her shoulder?

 

 

Published in October 2009, this is okay, I suppose. I find the background and title font flat and uninspiring, while the skeleton guitar is too small and strangely unappealing. The only part of the cover that really works are those blue-edged notes which are the only clue we get about the fun and energy within the book.

 

 

This cover, produced by Gollancz in December 2013, is the only one that comes close to the original in effectively depicting the fun and quirkiness of the story. I love the sweeping lines and the clever addition of the title and flowing author signature. However, why, why, why are the colours so dreary? This is a story full of zest about what transformative magic is to be had in music – gloomy shades of brown with the occasional tasteful orange accent simply doesn’t reflect the verve of the content.

 

 

This dreary, generic effort was produced by Corgi in October 2005 – what a difference a decade makes! Given they also used that wonderful original cover, I’m wondering if in the interim to save a couple of quid they got rid of their cover design department and instead asked someone’s younger brother if he could rustle something up using Shutterstock for a bit of pocket money – it certainly looks like it. Which is your favourite?  Do you agree with my choice – or my rather grumpy opinion of the rest of the covers?

Friday Faceoff – It shuffles through the dry, dusty darkness…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is mummification,, so I’ve chosen The Osiris Ritual – Book 2 of the Newbury and Hobbs seriesby George Mann – see my review here.

 

This gorgeous cover, produced by Snow Books in September 2009, is my favourite. I love the colours, the vivid colouring and beautiful, apt detail. The balance of information against that eye-catching design is perfect – in short this is one of my all-time favourite covers and is certainly the best of this selection.

 

This edition, produced in August 2010 by Tor Books is also a great effort. The giant sphinx and dark, muted colours certainly give a sense of the threat and catch the eye. I also like the title and author fonts, but it does lack the wonderful detail and flair of the previous cover.

 

Published in February 2012 by Piper, this is yet another strong offering, with plenty going on that is particularly applicable to the content. I like the steampunk cogs decorating the frame – enjoyable as well as informative – while the bridge disappearing off into the distant London landscape works well, given what the Osiris ritual is all about.

 

This cover, produced by Titan Books in November 2015, is another effective effort. The gold immediately sings out, drawing the eye and definitely setting it apart on the shelf – and again, I appreciate the icon that lets the reader know this is steampunk. It also sports the Newbury and Hobbes label – appropriate as this detective duo set in a steampunk version of Victorian London now has a solid fan following.

 

This edition was produced by Fahrenheitbooks in November 2014. This is the weakest effort, with a generic image that I don’t think works all that well with the font. Having said that, you would certainly notice it on a bookshelf. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is the moon, so I’ve chosen A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke.

 

This cover, produced by Gollancz in March 2002, evokes the era of when this classic was written back in 1961. I like the period feel and sense of drama, with the spaceman presumably going for help or rescue and the half-buried ship in the background. Great stuff!

 

This edition, produced in March 1971 by Signet, takes us right to the heart of the book – nothing generic here. We have the rather mountainous moonscape with the ship evidently trapped in the fine regolith and outcrop featuring in the foreground. Or is it the dust-covered corpse of a long-dead spaceman? I love the balance and dramatic contrast between the bright moon and dark sky. Despite the poor resolution, this is my favourite.

 

Published by Pan in 1969, this offering is far more generalised with a spaceship cruising through space. That said, the detailed artwork on the ship is beautiful and the spacescape is well done. I don’t like this one as much as the others, though.

 

This cover, produced by Spectra Arpil 1991, is also another effective, eye-catching cover. This one depicts the colony on the moon and a ship setting off – it may well be the one about to get into trouble. What particularly sets this one apart is the striking font. Inevitably on most of the covers, Clarke’s name is in the larger, brighter font as an established author with a strong fan following.

 

This edition was produced by Rosetta Books in November 2012. This is the cover I’ve been most conflicted about. Initially, I rolled my eyes and thought, somewhat huffily, that it was another lacklustre effort for the Kindle market. But… it absolutely nails the plot. A ship stranded in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by an ocean of lethal dust with the dark skies above. I also like the nifty handling of the font and author. The more I look at this one, the more I like it. Which one do you like best?

Friday Faceoff – Of all the words of mice and men, the saddest are, ‘it might have been’

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is mice, so I’ve chosen Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes.

This cover, produced by Mariner Books in May 2005, is the classic mouse in a maze. The red colour gives this cover punch and while I don’t normally like the blocks of colour featuring the title or author, the teal band at the bottom is part of the maze, which is far more elegant. I like this one.

This edition, produced in June 2004 by Harcourt Inc. Harvest Books also features a little white mouse. For some reason that escapes me, the cover designer thought that a white background would work. While I love the mouse and the font, this would have been so much more effective with another colour.

Published by Gollancz in 2000, this is yet another cover with a white mouse in the foreground. However, the backdrop is so much more interesting with a maze made of microcircuits in a beautiful cobalt blue. This one is my favourite.

This Romanian cover, produced by Editura Art in May 2013, is also another really effective cover. The backdrop is eye-catching and effective with the mottling – I’m not sure if it’s old blood or rust, either way, it looks disturbing. The little mouse looks small and vulnerable, while the maze – or is it a brain? – seems both makeshift and menacing.

This edition was produced by Harcourt, Brace and World in March 1966. This is the only cover that doesn’t include a mouse – instead the flowers of the title are featured in the middle of an ink blot. Again, I think this is yet another really strong contender. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Airplane travel is nature’s way of making you look like your passport photo

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is planes, so I’ve chosen Nevil Shute’s thriller No Highway.

 

This cover, produced by Vintage Classics in September 2009, is cool and retro. However, there’s such a thing as being too restrained and tasteful – could the title be less obtrusive? While it’s attractive, it isn’t eye-catching enough.

 

This paperback edition, produced in 1963 by Pan is more effective in depicting the tension that thrums through this novel. The fear on the man’s face is evident, even if this cover is clearly dated and of its time.

 

Published by Ace, this is another older cover full of drama and darkness. The crashed plane, the dark landscape and the chevron-shaped title and author name is attention-grabbing and links directly to the book’s content. This one is my favourite, despite its evident age.

 

This cover, produced by Ballantine, is another one full of drama with the plane evidently losing height and a mountain in the background looming menacingly. The prominence of the author’s name indicates that it was produced at the height of his popularity.

 

This Kindle edition, produced by Lion Books in May 2014 is another innocuous, well behaved effort that shows us a cloudscape from a plane seat. It is another cover that isn’t bothering to reach out to customers – a shame, really as it is a book that deserves to be read, like all his books. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Don’t leave me hanging on the telephone…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is phones, so I’ve chosen Stephen Booth’s police procedural crime series Scared to Live – Book 7 of the Cooper and Fry series – see my review here.

 

This cover, produced by Harper in Feburary 2009, is really effective. I love this one – the classic telephone box silhouetted against the reddish clouds in the open Derbyshire countryside. I think the fonts have also been very well handled on this cover.

 

This Kindle edition, produced by April 2014 by Witness Impulse, is another very effective cover. The red-hued lane featuring the stone cottages that are popular Derbyshire give this cover a solid sense of place and menace.

 

Published by Bantam in May 2009, this cover is also eye-catching with a particularly arresting title font glowing out of the dark car park facing the inevitable village pub. However, I think it is ruined by that clunky blue block along the bottom that intrudes with information more appropriate on the back.

 

This is the cover that features on the book I own – and was published by Harper Collins in June 2011. Perhaps this is unduly influencing me, but this is my favourite. I love the bleakness and the quirky font. Which one do you like best?

Friday Faceoff – Send in the clowns…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is circus, so I’ve chosen The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman.

 

This is the offering produced by Scribner February 2014. It is eye-catching and disturbing – the luminous image of a mermaid bounces out of the black border and accurately captures the mood of the book. That said, I probably wouldn’t have picked this one up if it had been wearing this cover, as it looks too creepy.

 

This cover was produced by Scribner for the paperback edition in September 2014. The beautiful girl off-centre with the scarf around her head looks vulnerable and the muted colour palette gives it a sense of menace. This is a lovely cover and, again, does reflect the mood of the book.

 

I’m intrigued to see that this far more circus-oriented cover is also produced by Scribner in April 2014. I love this one – it is eye-catching and colourful. But with the reflections in the dark water, there is also a sense that there is something darker behind the bright, pretty lights. This is my favourite cover – I love the detail and in particular, the way the title has been threaded through the artwork.

 

This is the cover design, produced by Simon & Schuster in March 2015, that tempted me to pluck this book off the shelves and read it. I was attracted by the title and the carnival feel that nevertheless felt slightly off… and the fact I thought it was very pretty.

 

This Hungarian edition, produced in June 2015 by Maxim, has gone for the horror vibe. And I think it has done it very well. That said, while there are genuinely shocking elements in this book, it isn’t horror or particularly scary so while I think the cover is a lovely, disturbing piece of artwork, it isn’t an accurate reflection of the book. I’m guessing there were a number of really annoyed Hungarian readers who picked this offering up thinking they were in for a fear-fest they didn’t get.

What about you – which is your favourite cover?

Friday Faceoff – I never let my schooling interfere with my education…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is school covers, so I’ve chosen Ender’s Game – Book 1 of Ender’s Saga by Scott Orson Card – a distinctly futuristic educational experience.

 

This is the offering produced by Tor in April 2010 is a lovely uncluttered cover, allowing us to fully appreciate the lovely artwork. I particularly like the depiction of Ender, who looks young and fragile for all his techie suit and cleverness – which is exactly as Card wrote him. This is my favourite cover.

 

This cover produced by Starscape in February 2002 gives us another view of Ender, who is clearly older here. But I love the colours and the detail as he struggles to prevail in the lethal game he is playing. It’s just a shame the title and author crunch so aggressively through the cover art.

 

This cover produced in October 2013 by Tor is clearly heavily influenced by the film. For all that, while I don’t like it quite as much as the previous two covers, I don’t dislike it, either.

 

This effort was produced by Orbit in 2011 is basically the cover of the film, featuring all the main characters superimposed on Ender’s face. For all that, I really like this one. It successfully captures the flavour of the book and as the casting was both clever and creative, even if the film fell some way short of the quality of the book, I think it is very successful.

 

This is another edition produced by Starscape in February 2002. While I know the definition is rather fuzzy, I like this one, too – especially as Ender is suitably young. I like the fact we have his classmates floating around in the background as well.

I think these are all good covers, though the first one just edges it for me. Which one is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Drivin’ Along in My Automobile…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is cars, so I’ve chosen Ill Wind by Rachel Caine.

 

willwindThis is the offering produced by Roc in December 2003 and was the reason why I selected this series of covers and it is the only one that features Joanne’s beloved car, Mona… I really like it, though I could do without that ugly black strip across the top of the cover.

 

willwind1This cover produced by Alison & Busby in January 2011 may have the inevitable beautiful girl scowling out at us, but at least she does look as if she’s in the middle of some serious weather. I also love the font design, which gives a real sense of movement and menace. This is my favourite.

 

willwind2This cover, produced by Eclipse in November 2010, is another good effort, with the tornado swirling in the distance and the girl representing Joanne Baldwin looking suitably storm-tossed.

 

willwind3This Czech edition, produced by Triton in 2006, is certainly different. I love the seascape and that magnificently stormy sky – but that oddly stilted tentacle female plonked in the middle of it rather ruins it, I think.

 

willwind4This Portuguese edition, produced by Underworld in 2010, features yet another grumpy beauty glaring out at us. She is certainly eye-catching, but I still prefer the covers featuring the dire weather as I think she is simply too generic.

Do you agree? Which of these covers do you like or loathe?