Tag Archives: feisty heroine

Can’t-Wait Wednesday – 19th September, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #Can’tWaitWednesday

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40276268 – vintage old pocket watch and book

Can’t-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted at Wishful Endings, to spotlight and discuss the books we’re excited about that we have yet to read. Generally they’re books that have yet to be released. It’s based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by the fabulous Jill at Breaking the Spine.

This week’s Can’t-Wait offering – The Consuming Fire – Book 2 of The Interdependency series by John Scalzi

#epic science fiction #political thriller #space travel

The Interdependency, humanity’s interstellar empire, is on the verge of collapse. The Flow, the extra-dimensional conduit that makes travel between the stars possible, is disappearing, leaving entire star systems stranded. When it goes, human civilization may go with it—unless desperate measures can be taken.

Emperox Grayland II, the leader of the Interdependency, is ready to take those measures to help ensure the survival of billions. But nothing is ever that easy. Arrayed before her are those who believe the collapse of the Flow is a myth—or at the very least, an opportunity that can allow them to ascend to power.

While Grayland prepares for disaster, others are preparing for a civil war, a war that will take place in the halls of power, the markets of business and the altars of worship as much as it will take place between spaceships and battlefields. The Emperox and her allies are smart and resourceful, but then so are her enemies. Nothing about this power struggle will be simple or easy… and all of humanity will be caught in its widening gyre.

I have read the preview chapters, provided by Netgalley and mostly enjoyed them, after loving the first book. Scalzi uses omniscient pov in this book, which gives it a slightly old fashioned feel, harking back to those epic adventures written in the last century. He manages to pull it off successfully, which isn’t all that easy to do. That said, there is a rather indigestible info-dump in the first chapter. Fortunately, it doesn’t last all that long, because Scalzi’s more usual, bouncy, irreverent voice punches through and whisks us up into this unfolding catastrophe. I’m really looking forward to getting hold of the whole book…

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Teaser Tuesday – 18th September, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #TeaserTuesday

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Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This is my choice of the day:
Sadie’s Wars: An Australian Saga – Book 3 in the Currency Girls series by Rosemary Noble

99% One day, in the late 1970s, a reporter from the Grimsby Evening Telegraph visited the Dolphin looking for a story. The landlord suggested he talk to his oldest regular, Stanley Timms, and a piece was written for the newspaper detailing his life. We read it; made fun of it because it sounded unbelievable. A father who owned an award-winning vineyard and a million-acre sheep station, a friend of the Murdochs, and Dame Nellie Melba, a winner of horse races and a member of the CIA in WW2. Not possible, we thought, until he produced his CIA membership card at Christmas dinner. Unassuming, gentle Stanley had spent his war behind Japanese lines as a coast watcher in Borneo. After the war, his forest, the sole remaining piece of Timms property was taken over by the Indonesian government, without compension, and he was left penniless.

BLURB: An astonishing tale, spanning continents, where truth is stranger than fiction. This historical saga of an extraordinary Australian pioneer family continues into a new generation. Sadie is brought up amongst the vineyards of the Yarra Valley whilst her work-obsessed father reaps riches from the boom years before the Great War. With post-war depression looming, Sadie’s only option is to flee from her disastrous marriage, seeking refuge in Cleethorpes, a small seaside town in northern England.

Years later, when her sons are in RAF Bomber Command, she receives a letter from her long-lost brother which forces her to confront the past and her part in her family’s downfall.

No… I haven’t given you a flavour of the story – you’ll have to take my word for it that the writing is fluent and very readable. This extract is from the Afterword as I was just boggled at the manner in which this family discovered they’d been related to a colourful, once highly-regarded member of Australian society who has now been written out of history… Noble has done a storming job of recreating this era through her fictionalised account of the life of Sadie, one of the family members in the middle of this eventful time.

Review of paperback book Hero at the Fall – Book 3 of The Rebel of the Sands trilogy by Alwyn Hamilton #Brainfluffbookreview #HeroattheFallbookreview

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I’ve read and thoroughly enjoyed the first two books in this series – read my review of Rebel of the Sands here. So I was keen to see how Hamilton wraps up this entertaining Sand and Sorcery adventure.

When gunslinging Amani Al’Hiza escaped her dead-end town, she never imagined she’d join a revolution, let alone lead one. But after the bloodthirsty Sultan of Miraji imprisoned the Rebel Prince Ahmed in the mythical city of Eremot, she doesn’t have a choice. Armed with only her revolver, her wits, and her untameable Demdji powers, Amani must rally her skeleton crew of rebels for a rescue mission through the unforgiving desert to a place that, according to maps, doesn’t exist. As she watches those she loves most lay their lives on the line against ghouls and enemy soldiers, Amani questions whether she can be the leader they need or if she is leading them all to their deaths.

What I’ve really enjoyed throughout this twisting, roller-coaster adventure in Amani’s first- person narrative, is the way her character has continued to grow and develop. She can look back at that gun-toting girl, desperate to escape a dead-end existence with some disgust and amazement – the way we often do when we look back at our own lives. Not that she has much time to ponder all that much – except how to get herself and her dwindling band of rebels out of the next awful bind they find themselves in.

Hamilton has a pleasing knack of tipping our feisty heroine from one disaster to another, while steadily upping the stakes. This gives the book a punchy, page-turning pace that meant it was very difficult to put this one down – except when I wanted to surface, gasp some sand-free air, before plunging right back into the maelstrom that is the final book in this series.

I kept waiting for the pace to slacken off… for Amani to have some sort of breathing space while she recollected herself and those around her fighting for freedom – and laying down their lives. What knocked the wind out of me was that characters I’d grown to like actually died. Reminding me that people who rebel against the status quo generally pay a very high price – in many cases, the ultimate price.

There were short, intervening chapters after a major event, where we were pulled out of Amani’s head into an omniscient narrator reciting what stories were told about it in times to come. Initially, I was a bit fed up as I’m not a fan of omniscient narration. But by the end, I found I was thankful for the lull and enjoyed the sense of historical impact this desperate struggle was having. As for the ending – yes, it worked. And make no mistake – this is a very big deal. Hamilton is building towards the major confrontation from the first page, so it has to matter and be sufficiently surprising, thrilling and engrossing to justify all those hair-raising escapades along the way. A suitable ending to an outstanding fantasy series that has lodged in my memory despite reading hundreds of other books along the way.

Recommended for fans of sand and sorcery adventures with a strong Eastern flavour in the writing – but whatever you do, don’t start with Hero at the Fall – first enjoy Rebel of the Sands.
10/10

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc Salvation’s Fire: After the War – Book 2 of the After the War series by Justina Robson #Brainfluffbookreview #SalvationsFirebookreview

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This has got to be one of my most eagerly anticipated reads of the year so far, given how much I enjoyed Adrian Tchaikovsky’s Redemption’s Blade. I was particularly intrigued that Justina Robson wrote this sequel, using Tachaikovsky’s world.

The Tzarkomen necromancers sacrificed a thousand women to create a Bride for the Kinslayer so he would spare them in the war. But the Kinslayer is dead and now the creation intended to ensure his eternal rule lies abandoned by its makers in the last place in the world that anyone would look for it. Which doesn’t prevent someone finding her by accident. Will the Bride return the gods to the world or will she bring the end of days? It all depends on the one who found her, Kula, a broken-hearted little girl with nothing left to lose.

So does this one work? Oh yes – this is an amazing premise. The Bride returning to the world long after the tyrant she was designed to partner, has been vanquished. What is her purpose now? And perhaps even more importantly – what will she decide to do, now her bridegroom is dead? The opening sequences surrounding the circumstances where we see the Bride return are really gripping, though I have a hunch if you haven’t read Redemption’s Blade, you might not appreciate the importance of the place and significance of what is happening. This is one sequel that should not be read as a stand-alone, in my opinion – apart from anything else it would be a crying shame to miss out on the joy that is Redemption’s Blade.

Part of the fun of reading a series is to chart the development of the main characters. If I have a niggle with this particular story, it is that Celestine, whose energy and concerns pinged off the pages in the first book, is a pale shadow in this adventure. While she is constantly around, I did find it frustrating not to have her opinions as vibrantly represented as in Tchaikovsky’s tale.

The other issue, which is more of an observation rather than a criticism, is that Robson’s style is denser than Tchaikovsky’s and I had to slow down and pay more attention to the text than when reading the first book. That said, I am a fan of Justina Robson’s writing – see my review of Down to the Bone – and am familiar with her style. I was fascinated to see how each author presented this interesting, complex world. I very much enjoyed the strong relationship between the newly resurrected Bride and the orphaned child, Kula – it isn’t often we see any form of parental relationships explored in science fiction and fantasy and I was delighted to watch how this partnership developed throughout the story.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed this one and would be happy to see Angry Robot approach another author to take this story on further. Or maybe have both Tchaikovsky and Robson follow up their efforts with another book each. However it’s done, I really, really hope this series continues – there is so much more I would like to know about these characters and this world. Recommended for fans of epic fantasy with a difference. While I obtained an arc of Salvation’s Fire: After the War from the publisher via Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
9/10

Can’t-Wait Wednesday – 5th September, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #Can’tWaitWednesday

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Can’t-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted at Wishful Endings, to spotlight and discuss the books we’re excited about that we have yet to read. Generally they’re books that have yet to be released. It’s based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by the fabulous Jill at Breaking the Spine.

This week’s Can’t-Wait offering – A Muddle of Magic – Book 2 of the Fledgling Magic series by Alexandra Rushe

#portal fantasy #adventure #feisty heroine #magical monsters

What’s a nice Southern girl doing in a place like this?

Whisked from humdrum Alabama to the fantastical land of Tandara by a mage who won’t take no for an answer, Raine Stewart finds herself tangled in a muddle of magic. A Dark Wizard is out for her blood, a demonic golem has orders to dispatch her . . . and she stinks at magic. Being a wizard, even a baby wizard, is harder than Raine thought.

Raine and her companions find sanctuary amongst the famed warriors of the snow-capped nation of Finlara, and Raine is reunited with her dear friend, the frost giant Tiny Bartog. In short order, she unearths a magic mirror, a dread curse, and a tragic, ill-fated love affair.

Safety, however, is an illusion. The dreaded Magog’s Eye is still missing, and war looms. It seems an entire world hangs in the balance, waiting to see whether Raine will be able to harness her magic. But with a little help from her friends, she’ll survive . . . she hopes.

This one is great fun, with lots of magical creatures and Raine’s happy knack for making friends keeps her alive in this vibrant, fascinating but lethal world where she has made a very powerful enemy. I thoroughly enjoyed the adventure and will be reviewing it in due course.

Review of KINDLE Ebook Menagerie – Book 1 of the Menagerie series by Rachel Vincent #Brainfluffbookreview #Menageriebookreview

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I like this author – see my review of Pride which also has something to say about the modern world within her escapist fantasy story. So when I saw the third book in this series featured on Netgalley, I requested it and when I was approved and realised that this wasn’t one I could crash into – I got hold of the previous two books in the series.

When Delilah Marlow visits a famous traveling carnival, Metzger’s Menagerie, she is an ordinary woman in a not-quite-ordinary world. But under the macabre circus big-top, she discovers a fierce, sharp-clawed creature lurking just beneath her human veneer. Captured and put on exhibition, Delilah is stripped of her worldly possessions, including her own name, as she’s forced to “perform” in town after town. But there is breathtaking beauty behind the seamy and grotesque reality of the carnival. Gallagher, her handler, is as kind as he is cryptic and strong. The other “attractions”—mermaids, minotaurs, gryphons and kelpies—are strange, yes, but they share a bond forged by the brutal realities of captivity. And as Delilah struggles for her freedom, and for her fellow menagerie, she’ll discover a strength and a purpose she never knew existed.

And there you have it. Creatures which are not fully human are rounded up, stripped of any rights, caged and put on display for the public. Other than the direct, uncomfortable example of what we often do to the animals we share this planet with – what I kept thinking about was those who are trafficked and sold into slavery. The justification for this treatment is an event called the Reaping, where thousands of children were slaughtered by their parents under some mysterious compulsion that has never been fully explained – except that it is believed to be by a creature with non-human powers.

This dystopian, alternative history is well established and I thoroughly believed in Delilah, an apparently ordinary twenty-five-year-old bank teller who reluctantly goes along to one of these carnivals with her friends and fiancé. The ensuing incident sees her stripped of any of her human rights and put in a cage right along the other specimens on display. I really enjoyed following her journey – it was engrossing and horrifying. Though it did jar with me when we were occasionally yanked out of her first-person viewpoint, finding ourselves in the point of view of one of the supporting characters. It didn’t happen sufficiently often with the same characters for it feel anything other than a bit random.

Other than that, I thoroughly enjoyed this one. Delilah makes a convincing protagonist and I enjoyed how many of the imprisoned exhibits looked after each other. The pace is well judged, as you’d expect from a writer of her experience and I gobbled this one up in two sittings. Recommended for fans of character-led, darker fantasy and no romance.
9/10

Sunday Post – 2nd September, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Apologies for having gone dark on the blog, but I was staying with my sister-in-law in Bexhill, who booked a flat with a sea view while she grappled with her thesis and invited me to join her last week. In doing so, I ticked off one of my bucket list wishes – writing in a round room with views of the sea from every window… It was glorious. I kept looking up and pinching myself to check I actually was there. The cherry on top was that the weather was lovely except for one rainy morning and Celia and I get along really well together and found writing together helped both of us.

As a result, in the three days I was staying there I managed to write over 16,000 words of Mantivore Preys, the second book in my series about telepathic alien, Vrox. I returned from the writing break feeling more refreshed and relaxed than I’ve felt for months. It was lovely to see Himself again – especially as he met me in Brighton to help me negotiate my very heavy cases on and off the train home.

Mhairi spent the day with me yesterday as we discussed all things writing and poked the Marketing dragon with a sharp stick. I hope you have all had a great week and I look forward to catching up with everyone during the week.

This week I have read:

A Muddle of Magic – Book 2 of the Fledgling Magic series by Alexandra Rushe
What’s a nice Southern girl doing in a place like this?

Whisked from humdrum Alabama to the fantastical land of Tandara by a mage who won’t take no for an answer, Raine Stewart finds herself tangled in a muddle of magic. A Dark Wizard is out for her blood, a demonic golem has orders to dispatch her . . . and she stinks at magic. Being a wizard, even a baby wizard, is harder than Raine thought.
I regularly crash into the middle of series and don’t find it a problem, but I think I would have benefitted from having read the first book in this series. That said, I found Raine an enjoyable, sympathetic protagonist and the various adventures engrossing. The outstanding feature of this book was the variety of the magical monsters on offer, along with the excellent scene-setting.

The Zero Blessing – Book 1 of The Zero Enigma by Christopher G. Nuttell
Caitlyn Aguirre should have been a magician. Her family certainly expected her to be a magician. But by the time she reached her twelfth birthday, Caitlyn hadn’t even managed to cast a single spell! In desperation, her parents send her – and her magical sisters – to Jude’s Sorcerous Academy, her last best chance to discover her powers.

But as she struggles to survive her classes without a single spell to her name, Caitlyn starts to uncover an ancient mystery that may prove the key to her true powers … If she lives long enough to find it.
I thoroughly enjoyed this one. School-based stories are a weakness of mine, anyway. But Nuttell really nails the sympathetic young protagonist in this engrossing children’s book that is too good to leave to the youngsters. Ideal for fans of Harry Potter…

Fury – Book 3 of the Menagerie series by Rachel Vincent
1986: Rebecca Essig leaves a slumber party early but comes home to a massacre—committed by her own parents. Only one of her siblings has survived. But as the tragic event unfolds, she begins to realize that other than a small army of six-year-olds, she is among very few survivors of a nationwide slaughter.

The Reaping has begun.

Present day: Pregnant and on the run with a small band of compatriots, Delilah Marlow is determined to bring her baby into the world safely and secretly. But she isn’t used to sitting back while others suffer, and she’s desperate to reunite Zyanya, the cheetah shifter, with her brother and children. To find a way for Lenore the siren to see her husband. To find Rommily’s missing Oracle sisters. To unify this adopted family of fellow cryptids she came to love and rely on in captivity.

But Delilah is about to discover that her role in the human versus cryptid war is destined to be much larger—and more dangerous—than she ever could have imagined.
This is the final book in this disturbing dystopian fantasy in an alternative world where supernatural creatures used to live alongside humans peacefully – until the Reaping. I was sort of expecting more of the same gritted struggle to stay hidden by this small band, who are desperate not to be caught again. I hadn’t expected to also get a ringside seat at the Reaping, the defining event which led to the persecution of all supernatural races. This gripping final instalment answers all sorts of questions raised in the previous two books and successfully brought the series to an amazing and emotional climax.

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 27th August 2018

Review of Nolander – Book 1 of the Emanations series by Becca Mills

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring Nyxia – Book 1 of The Nyxia Triad by Scott Reintgen

Review of The Zero Blessing – Book 1 of The Zero Enigma by Christopher G. Nuttall

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Kindred Spirits – Book 5 of the Gabriel Ash and Hazel Best series by Jo Bannister

Apologies but this week I am unable to feature other articles and blogs as I normally do, because I haven’t been browsing online – I’ve been writing, instead. Have a great week and thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site.

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc Foundryside – Book 1 of the Founders series by Robert Jackson Bennett #Brainfluffbookreview #Foundrysidebookreview

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I spotted this one on several book blogging sites I respect, but when Lynn at Lynn’s Book Blog featured it as one of her upcoming reads, I scampered across to Netgalley and managed to get approved for it. And we agreed to buddy read it…

Sancia Grado is a thief, and a damn good one. And her latest target, a heavily guarded warehouse on Tevanne’s docks, is nothing her unique abilities can’t handle. But unbeknownst to her, Sancia’s been sent to steal an artifact of unimaginable power, an object that could revolutionize the magical technology known as scriving. The Merchant Houses who control this magic–the art of using coded commands to imbue everyday objects with sentience–have already used it to transform Tevanne into a vast, remorseless capitalist machine. But if they can unlock the artifact’s secrets, they will rewrite the world itself to suit their aims. Now someone in those Houses wants Sancia dead, and the artifact for themselves. And in the city of Tevanne, there’s nobody with the power to stop them…

Part of the rather chatty blurb above makes it clear the magic system is complex with a long, involved history. Back at the height of a lost civilisation, the ancients were able to wield magic to do unimaginable things and it is the discovery of some of their magical objects that has allowed the brightest minds to work out how to rekindle magical power, albeit in a bastardised form. It is the discovery of this magic powering the rise of the four merchanting families, who have a stranglehold on Tevanne. Furthermore, those who are not born into the service of these houses, or are thrown away after they have outlived their usefulness, scrabble for survival in the Commons. And there’s Sancia, whose backstory is different again…

I loved the premise and the world. It seems entirely plausible that a capitalist system would reward those with the magical skills and artefacts, while neglecting those who aren’t so fortunate. Sancia is a brilliant protagonist – one of the best I have read this year. Gritted, determined and focused on surviving, with a special ability that she would love to lose, she is a thief. Bennett writes her ability brilliantly and I found myself engrossed in her plight.

So I was more than a tad fed up when the action scenes were halted by chunks of explanation of how the magic works in omniscient point of view. The most egregious example occurs about halfway through the book during a fight – where the courageous hero is left hanging in mid-realisation that his attackers are flying, while we break off for a detailed explanation as to why flying is technically a really tricky business and therefore illegal… It was the only sheer quality of the writing and characters saved the book from flying across the room at this point. I would prefer an appendix where the magic system is explained in detail for those who like drilling into such details of the worldbuilding, rather than crashing across the story so intrusively.

Rant aside, this book is a joy. Fortunately the info-dumps decrease significantly in the second half of the book, allowing the pace to pick up. The world is well described and the characters gripped me – I like the fact that despite the patriarchy running Tevanne, there are plenty of strong, not necessarily likeable female characters who punch through the institutional obstacles in their path. But the character who shines through all of this is Sancia – I dreamt of her… Damaged, scarred and struggling with mental issues, she is still battling to move forward and strive for something better. The climax works brilliantly and I liked the ending, which nicely sets this one up for the sequel, which I look forward to reading.

Highly recommended for those who enjoy detailed, urban fantasy tales peopled with awesome characters – if that appendix was in place this book would have scored a 10. While I obtained an arc of Foundryside from the publisher via Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
8/10

#Sunday Post – 19th August, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

In theory, this is the week where I should have been able to get cracking on Mantivore Preys, the second book in my series about a telephathic alien, and take it a bit easy as it was my ‘free’ week. In practice, after going down to Ringwood last Sunday, I woke up on Monday feeling wiped out and headachy. During the day my sciatica also flared up. Joy…

The rest of the week I felt as energetic as a limp lettuce leaf, though my boxed set of Gavin and Stacey cheered me up when I took a duvet-day on Wednesday. By Friday I’d sufficiently recovered to have my writing friend, Mhairi over. We had a leisurely lunch and just as we set off for home, when my daughter asked if I would have the children for the weekend. We collected them on Friday evening and the rest of the weekend has passed in a blur as we shopped till we dropped on Saturday and this morning we went swimming, while Oscar helped me make lunch. I hadn’t had both children together since before the summer holidays so it was lovely to have them staying over again, before they go back to school.

And the other news – Running Out of Space is now available in paperback!

This week I have read:

Foundryside – Book 1 of the Founders series by Robert Jackson Bennett
The city of Tevanne runs on scrivings, industrialised magical inscriptions that make inanimate objects sentient; they power everything, from walls to wheels to weapons. Scrivings have brought enormous progress and enormous wealth – but only to the four merchant Houses who control them. Everyone else is a servant or slave, or they eke a precarious living in the hellhole called the Commons.

There’s not much in the way of work for an escaped slave like Sancia Grado, but she has an unnatural talent that makes her one of the best thieves in the city. When she’s offered a lucrative job to steal an ancient artefact from a heavily guarded warehouse, Sancia agrees, dreaming of leaving the Commons – but instead, she finds herself the target of a murderous conspiracy. Someone powerful in Tevanne wants the artefact, and Sancia dead – and whoever it is already wields power beyond imagining.
Wonderful characters, cracking plot and a really complex, layered magical system. I read this alongside Lynn of Lynn’s Book Blog and we will both be reviewing this during the coming week.

 

Fallen Princeborn: Stolen by Jean Lee
And there is no blurb yet – because yours truly has been asked to write one! I’m very excited at the prospect of doing so and obviously won’t be trotting out my thoughts here as Jean and her publisher need to see what I’ve got to say about this wonderfully, engrossing read.
I loved this one, which starts with bang, immediately immersing us into a very tricky situation that continues to get worse… This book is due to be published at the end of October.

 

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 12th August 2018

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Garrison Girl – Book 1 of The Attack on Titan! series by Rachel Aaron

Teaser Tuesday featuring Foundryside – Book 1 of the Founders series by Robert Jackson Bennett

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring Select Few – Book 2 of the Select series by Marit Weisenberg

Review of Pirate Nemesis – Book 1 of the Telepathic Space Pirate series by Carysa Locke

Friday Face-off – A very little key… featuring A Wind in the Door – Book 2 of the Quintet series by Madaleine L’Engle

Review of Drifters; Alliance – Book 1 of the Drifters’ Alliance by Elle Casey

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Edinburgh Bookshops https://marvelatwords.wordpress.com/2018/08/12/edinburgh-bookshops/ I loved this article from Wendle – and of course book bloggers need to know where the bookshops are! I took particular note of this one as Edinburgh is somewhere I’d love to visit. My mother met my father when working there, so there’s a strong reason to check out the place that brought me into being😊.

How to Read The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner https://thisislitblog.com/2018/08/12/how-to-read-the-sound-and-the-fury-by-william-faulkner/ I was so impressed by this. I recalled Shruti’s initial ‘ahhh’ reaction when she first sat down with this one – and surely no one would have blamed her if she’d thrown up her hands and walked away. She didn’t. And this helpful article explains how she went about dealing with this demanding but very rewarding book.

The Great Wildebeest Migration http://chechewinnie.com/the-great-wildebeest-migration/ This is one of the magical aspects of the blogging world – I may spend most of my time in front of my computer, but I can still access corners of the world I probably will never get to see. And this is one of those amazing events…

Seven Books That Gave Me a Book High https://caffeinatedbookreviewer.com/2018/08/seven-books-that-gave-me-a-book-high.html Kimberly at Caffeinated Reviewer is celebrating her seventh blogoversary and this article was one of my favourites. She is also the hostess with the mostest as anyone who takes part in the Sunday Post will agree.

The Hack’s Guide to Buying a Writing Desk http://writerunboxed.com/2018/08/18/the-hacks-guide-to-buying-a-writing-desk/ I always make a point of reading articles from this smart, funny writer – and this one didn’t disappoint – his author biog is a hoot.

A Night’s Dream of Books https://anightsdreamofbooks.blogspot.com/2018/08/book-blogger-hop-no-139-favorite.html?spref=tw In talking about her favourite book bloggers, I was delighted and humbled to find that Maria had nominated me. But what sets this article apart are her reasons for her selection – her attitude towards the book blogging community echoes my own…

Thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site and have a great week.

Review of KINDLE Ebook Drifters’ Alliance – Book 1 of the Drifters’ Alliance series by Elle Casey #Brainfluffbookreview DriftersAlliancebookreview

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I was looking for more space opera goodness, when I noticed this offering on my Kindle, courtesy of Himself, so I opened it up and dived in…

One hand of cards and it’s all over but the crying… Cass Kennedy finally gets what she’s been dreaming of for the past ten years: a drifter ship to call her own. All the sim time and battle training is going to pay off in spades as she sets her course for the future. She’ll be living on her own terms, not those of her father. But drifting through deep space with a crew of nutty strangers on the DS Anarchy carries a lot more surprises than she bargained for. Nobody told her that her ship is falling apart, that dead chickens are something you really want to hang on to, and that the OSG has big plans for the universe that don’t necessarily jibe with her plans for herself.

This book plunges straight into a card game with the highest stakes – a nineteen-year-old girl betting her virginity against a ship. I’m not giving too much away when I reveal that she wins. And thus starts this space opera adventure, full of action and excitement as Cass gets to grips with her unusual crew, the quirks of an elderly ship not in the best condition and a very angry ex-captain, intent on retrieving his ship.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story. Cass makes an engaging protagonist and whilst my eyebrows were initially raised at the idea of a nineteen-year-old having the sheer life experience and street smarts to be able to walk into such a post – Casey ensures we realise that her background uniquely qualifies her. The first person narrative bounces along as Cass’s energetic, can-do personality drives the story forward – and that certainly chimes with her age. All too often, young protagonists are far too cagey and world-weary, more reflecting the experiences of their older, warier authors than the youngsters who they are supposed to portray. Not so in this case. While she has had a harsh, abusive childhood, Cass has the sheer bravado that comes with simply being young and hungry.

There is also a very scary major antagonist in the background, the more so as he doesn’t make an appearance in this book… but one of his underlings does. In amongst all the action and mayhem, there is also a generous dollop of humour. This isn’t a clench-jawed thriller – more of a rollicking adventure, full of incident and quirky characters. Which is not to say there aren’t some moments of high drama – the scene where they are attempting to extract ice to top up their water tanks under the noses of the overbearing intergalactic force, who have just slapped a tax on all water sources, crackles with tension.

All in all, this is a strong start to what promises to be an exciting, entertaining space opera series and I’m looking forward to getting my hands on the next book, Drifters’ Alliance – Book 2.
8/10