Tag Archives: science fiction adventure

Can’t-Wait Wednesday – 8th July, 20202 #Brainfluffbookblog #CWC #WOW

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Can’t-Wait Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted at Wishful Endings, to spotlight and discuss the books we’re excited about that we have yet to read. Generally they’re books that have yet to be released. It’s based on Waiting on Wednesday, hosted by the fabulous Jill at Breaking the Spine.

This week’s Can’t-Wait offering – Chaos Vector – Book 2 of The Protectorate series by Megan E. O’Keefe – release date, 28th July, 2020

#science fiction #space opera adventure


BLURB: Dazzling space battles, intergalactic politics, and rogue AI collide in the second book in this epic space opera by award-winning author Megan O’Keefe.

Sanda and Tomas are fleeing for their lives after letting the most dangerous smartship in the universe run free. Now, unsure of who to trust, Sanda knows only one thing for certain — to be able to save herself from becoming a pawn of greater powers, she needs to discover the secret of the coordinates hidden in her skull.

But getting to those coordinates is a problem she can’t solve alone. They exist beyond a dead gate — a Casimir gate that opened up into a dead-end system without resources worth colonizing, and was sealed off. To get through the dead gate, she needs the help of the enemy Nazca. But some Nazca are only interested in the chip in her head — and they’ll crack her open to get to it.

I haven’t yet read anything by this author, although I’m aware she is an established writer with a strong reputation. But space opera is my favourite genre – and the opportunity of reading a cracking tale set in space by a good writer made this one irresistible. And for once – no… I’m NOT going to crash mid-way into this series, I’m hoping in the coming week to read the first book, Velocity Weapon. Has anyone else got Chaos Vector on their TBR?

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc War of the Maps by Paul McAuley #Brainfluffbookreview #WaroftheMapsbookreview

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I was delighted to see this offering on Netgalley, as Paul McAuley is always worth reading – I thoroughly enjoyed his cli-fi thriller Austral and the first book in his sci fi series The Quiet War.

BLURB: On a giant artificial world surrounding an artificial sun, one man – a lucidor, a keeper of the peace, a policeman – is on the hunt. His target was responsible for an atrocity, but is too valuable to the government to be truly punished. Instead he has been sent to the frontlines of the war, to use his unique talents on the enemy. So the lucidor has ignored orders, deserted from his job, left his home and thrown his life away, in order to finally claim justice.

I thoroughly enjoyed this one. The worldbuilding, as ever with McAuley, was both detailed and plausible. But what I liked most of all about this story was that we mostly stayed in the viewpoint of the lawman, known as a lucidor, who is determined to track down a truly horrible antagonist – a murderer who casually commits atrocities, and enjoying watching his victims suffer. Unfortunately, he is also one of the foremost scientific thinkers on the planet who is able to help fight the influx of mutated creatures engulfing villages, countryside and towns, slaughtering humanity, domestic animals and wildlife alike. There are some gripping passages of the ruined landscape where no birds or insects break the silence…

So, who is right – the dogged lucidor who is convinced that Remfrey He should account for the lives he has torn apart? Or the authorities who feel that, in this extremely unusual case, Remfrey He should be allowed to atone for his misdeeds by travelling to the site of the suffering land to assist in beating back the alter women? These grotesque mutations have a social structure resembling ants and gather everything in their path to tear up and reuse it for their own purposes – including people.

Remfrey He is one of the most satisfyingly nasty characters I’ve encountered in a while, and by contrast, I grew to love the lucidor, whose name we hardly ever see. He has adopted his birth name, Thorn, after he retired from his profession of tracking down lawbreakers, when he was known as Lucidor Kyl. He is elderly, tough, resourceful and trusts no one and we’re in his head for a large chunk of the narrative. This story starts off as one man tracking another through an increasingly dangerous landscape, and broadens out as the lucidor is sucked into some of the upheavals caused by the dangerous mutations.

One of the intriguing details is that some people are gifted with particular talents, such as scrying. As well as being brilliant and resourceful, Remfrey He is a silvertongue, with the gift of persuading most people to become his disciples. And the reason why the lucidor was sent after him, is that his gift nullifies the talents of those in close proximity. I liked how that played out, because the consequence is that other people who might be able to successfully apprehend Remfrey He don’t want to work with the lucidor, as he sucks their gift dry.

This isn’t a fast-paced book. McAuley’s habit of writing dense description about every step of the way ensures that we see the world through the lucidor’s eyes and his days of plunging headlong into adventures are well and truly over. But I not only could see the world, I could taste and hear it, as this book swallowed me up and had me engrossed until right up to the end. It’s a gem that deserves to be far better known than it is. Highly recommended by fans of well-written intelligent colony world adventures and epic fantasy. The ebook arc copy of War of the Maps was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest opinion of the book.
10/10

Friday Faceoff – Dark they were and golden-eyed… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceofffirstcontactcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring FIRST CONTACT covers. I’ve selected Foreigner – Book 1 of the Foreigner series by C.J. Cherryh, who writes this dynamic so very, very well…

 

This edition was produced by DAW in December 2004 and as you can see, it’s an anniversary edition – I’m still reeling at the thought that Foreigner was first released in 1994… I really like this cover – the aliens are spot on, as far as Cherryh’s description of them goes and poor old Bren is looking suitably worried between them, which is also nicely accurate. I also like the styling of the font and the warm tones. This was going to be my favourite, especially as it’s the cover design of the book we own.

 

Published in September 1995 by Mondadori, this Italian cover is my least favourite. It’s a long time since I read this one, but given the title, this image gives the impression that the book as about a bald man with a big gun and a bad attitude – and it isn’t. Bren certainly isn’t that kind of hero – he’s an academic who became caught up by a chain of events into being an ambassador for these warlike enigmatic aliens. It’s a shame, because as a cover, that is a really effective image with the gun looming out at us.

 

This Czech edition, published by Triton in 2003 2010, is also a good effort. The aliens ride huge shaggy beasts that look a bit mammoth-like, but are a great deal more highly strung. The image of one of these creatures seen through a porthole makes an interesting picture and certainly would have me wanting to pick this one up and take a closer look.

 

This Polish edition, produced by MAG in 1997, I think, the weakest of all the covers. I don’t think that spacescape works particularly well, as there is far too much going on, cluttering it up. And the image of the alien looks all wrong. Worse, it’s completely misleading as the aliens are not in space. Space never comes into it – they are on their home planet and have just evolved to have steam power. So… ineffective and misleading. And frankly ugly. Which is something I never thought I’d say about a spacescape.

 

This French edition, published by Mnémos in January 2012 is my favourite. I love the depiction of the aliens – there is a real sense of emotion and tension between them and the shadowing gives a sense of the mystery about them which pervades the book. The splashes of red really pop and I think this cover is both visually pleasing and bang on when depicting a really tricky book to nail down. Bren’s difficult position and sense of isolation also is apparent in the slump of his shoulders. It’s reminded me all over again just how much I loved the series when I first started reading it – and that I should get back into it. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Take Me to Your Leader… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffvintagescificovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring VINTAGE SCI FI covers. I’ve selected Have Space Suit – Will Travel by Robert Heinlein.

 

This edition was produced by Del Rey Books in May 1985 and is purposely recreating a cover used on a much earlier edition – this one was originally published in 1958. I really like this one. Yes… I know it has a dreadful, intrusive textbox, but at least there is the excuse that back in those days, they were still in vogue. I love detailed artwork – that expression of grumpy surprise on the poor alien beastie is hilarious.

 

Published in July 1987 by New English Library, this one is my favourite. I love the 1950s space suit and the way the light glimmers off it. In fact the artwork on this one is outstanding, with the small town tucked up for the night adding to the sense of place – and not a nasty, intrusive textbox to be seen!

 

This edition, published by Ace in June 1975, is rather weird and quirky. Those odd faces surrounding the worried-looking young man in the jaunty spacesuit look comedic. As far as I can gather, this one is a very early YA space opera adventure, though I’m unsure if it is supposed to be particularly funny.

 

This edition, produced by Charles Scribner’s Sons in 1958, certainly packs a visual punch. That vivid yellow background really draws the eye and works very well with the brilliant red figure – and I’m impressed no one added anything else. I was surprised to learn this was one of the original covers – it feels far more modern with the funky colours and stripped-back design – again, no textbox to clutter and disfigure.

 

This edition, published by New English Library in June 1985, is another strong offering. I love that beautiful, multi-coloured backdrop, while that foreshortened figure is seen from below – a really unusual viewpoint. This attractive and original cover manages to be stylish and different, yet still keeps within the genre. This one is definitely a contender. Which is your favourite?

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of INDIE arc Borderline – Book 4 of the Hive Mind series by Janet Edwards #Brainfluffbookreview #Borderlinebookreview

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Janet Edwards, author of the successful Earth Girl series – see my reviews of Earth Girl, Earth Star and Earth Flight – is now one of my favourite science fiction authors. Her writing has a bounce and vividness that I thoroughly enjoy, while her young protagonists are invariably engaging and likeable. This intriguing crime-fighting series featuring Amber, who tracks down wrong-doers by reading their minds, is set in a far future where humans live in highly structured mega-cities underground. See my reviews of Telepath, Defender and Hurricane which are the previous books in the series. I was delighted when Edwards contacted me and asked if I’d like an arc copy of Borderline to read and review. This review is my honest opinion of the book and in no way affected by receipt of a copy by the author.

BLURB: Being a telepath means your greatest strength can also be your greatest weakness.
Eighteen-year-old Amber is the youngest of the five telepaths who protect the hundred million citizens of one of the great hive cities of twenty-sixth century Earth. Her job is hunting down criminals before they commit their crimes, but this time she must face multiple challenges.

The blurb continues for another paragraph, but to be honest, I don’t think the extra information is necessary. Amber is now established as one of the foremost telepaths in this huge hive city, but also increasingly under pressure as one of the other telepaths now needs to take a prolonged leave of absence while requiring urgent medical treatment. Edwards is very adept at communicating the rules for her world, without holding up the pace or indulging in info-dumps. The first-person narration works well, as Amber is at the heart of the story and we learn about the stresses on her, as touching minds full of violence and misery leave aftershocks that can destabilise her if they aren’t dealt with.

There is a strong supporting cast of well developed characters who operate as part of Amber’s team and I also love the shifting dynamic and growing amount of information we learn about the other, rather shadowy telepaths. It’s refreshing to see the stable, happy relationship between Amber and her partner – YA reads are notorious for providing lots of angst around the romance thread, but Edwards doesn’t choose to go down that route. I tucked into this one and the pages flew by as I was pulled along by Amber’s bouncy narrative and the action-packed story that held me right until the final sentence. And there was a doozy of a surprise near the end which I certainly didn’t see coming – I love it when that happens!

This one is very highly recommended for fans of sci fi crime and future worlds. Though this book can be enjoyed as a standalone, my advice would be to read the first three books first as this series is too good to read out of sequence.
9/10

Friday Faceoff – In the deep midwinter… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffwintercovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring WINTER COVERS. I’ve selected Antarctica by Kim Stanley Robinson.

 

This edition was produced by Bantam in July 1999. First the good news. I like the eye-catching font, which works well in giving a clue as to the genre. But other than that, I think the artwork is dreary with a muddy colour palette – not what I associate with a snowscape. And I thoroughly dislike the chatty textbox in the middle of the cover – why isn’t that on the back cover, where it belongs? Overall, this is a lacklustre, charmless effort – this interesting, memorable book deserves better.

 

Published in September 1999 by Voyager, this is a definite improvement on the previous effort. Again, I really like the punchy font with the 3-D effect and the artwork is far more satisfactory than the previous effort, clearly indicating the futuristic timescale. This one is so nearly my favourite…

 

This edition, published by Voyager, is my favourite. That might have something to do with the fact that this is the cover of the edition that I’d read and thoroughly enjoyed. It’s something of a surprise that I like this one so much, given my general dislike of textboxes and most of this cover features the two chunky textboxes, with the artwork almost an afterthought. However, I really like the frosted effect on the textboxes that give this cover a bright, icy feel missing from most of the offerings.

 

This Finnish edition, produced by Otava, also has a nifty title font. I really like the way it is reflected in the icy foreground, though I am underwhelmed by the author font which looks odd tucked away in a thin strip across the top of the cover. The colours are far more appropriate for a snowscape – that cold blue and the white foreground works well.

 

This French edition, published by Presses de la Cité, is a rather lack-lustre affair. The picture of a random series of ice floes, with a font slapped across the front, looks like someone’s effort with Adobe Photoshop, I think. Which is your favourite?

Teaser Tuesday – 26th November, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #TeaserTuesday #SciFiMonth2019

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Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers! This week, I’m linking this post to Sc Fi Month 2019.

This is my choice of the day:

Navigating the Stars – Book 1 of Sentinels of the Galaxy by Maria V. Snyder
6%: With that last gift, my funeral officially ends. There is no good-bye or we’ll be in touch. I hug Lan and leave the room with only memories and a couple of photographs to add to my collection.

Emotionally drained, I head back to our housing unit. Each step an effort of will. By the time I reach my bedroom, I make a promise.

No more friends. Ever.

BLURB: “The answer is no, Lyra,” my mother utters her favorite—I swear—phrase.

No means I have to travel with them to another planet—again.

No means leaving all my friends fifty years in the past. Thanks, Einstein.

Seventeen-year-old Lyra Daniels can’t truly blame Einstein or her parents for their impending move across the Milky Way Galaxy. It’s all due to the invention of the Q-net, which made traveling the vast distances in space possible—with one big caveat: the time dilation. But that never stopped Lyra’s ancestors from exploring the Milky Way, searching for resources and exoplanets to colonize. What they didn’t expect to find is life-sized terracotta Warriors buried on twenty-one different exoplanets.

… Make that twenty-two.

As the Galaxy’s leading experts on the Warriors, Lyra’s parents are thrilled by the new discovery, sending them—and her—fifty years into the future. Her social life in ruins, she fills her lonely days by illegally worming into the Q-net. The only person close to her age is the annoyingly irresistible security officer who threatens to throw her into the brig.

After the planet they just left goes silent—meaning no communications from them at all—security has bigger problems to deal with than Lyra, especially when vital data files go missing. But that’s just the beginning, because they’re not as alone as they thought on their new planet… and suddenly time isn’t the only thing working against them.

As you can see, I haven’t got very far into this one, but I love the premise. I’ve found the prospect of travelling across the vast distances, yet still having to deal with time dilation gives family dynamics a twist that immediately ups the stakes.

Sunday Post – 24th November, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Another funfilled week. Himself’s shoulder injury is apparently an issue with his neck and while he is coping better, it’s because he now is now taking three different types of painkiller. I’ve still been battling on and off with this wretched headache, which I think is a mixture of stress and lack of sleep. And then on Tuesday I broke a tooth. I’ve a delightful visit with the dentist ahead of me, involving lots of tooth-drilling while gazing up his nose, and then handing across an eye-watering amount of money at the end of it. And that’s all going to happen in early December on my mother’s birthday.

One chink of light in all this November murk – will it EVER stop raining??? – is that my sister now is in the process of moving into her new home. I spent yesterday morning with her, helping to hang curtains and put up a shower rail. The other chink is that in the middle of all this misery, I’ve managed to dive back into Mantivore Warrior – to be honest, writing about the struggles of my young hero while MindLinked to a rather grumpy alien is something of a relief…

Last week I read:

Aurora by Kim Stanley Robinson
Our voyage from Earth began generations ago. Now, we approach our new home.
AURORA.
This was a really intriguing read about a generational ship finally approaching its destination after a long, long time in space… Review to follow.

 

 

AUDIOBOOK – Poirot’s Finest Cases: Eight Full-Cast BBC Radio Dramatisations adapted from the books of Agatha Christie
This included Murder on the Orient Express, The ABC Murders and my favourite – The Mysterious Affair at Styles.
All these stories were given the full Radio 4 treatment, including a stellar cast of the great and good of British acting at the time and were well worth the cost of a single credit. Review to follow.

 

 

The Violent Fae – Book 3 of The Ordshaw series by Phil Williams
They hid among us, until she exposed them. They’ll destroy everything to be hidden again.
Pax is discovering that the smallest mistakes can have the deadliest impact. To protect her city, she’s uncovered monstrous truths and involved terrible people. The consequences are coming for her. The Sunken City is unstable. The Fae are armed for war. Can Pax stop the coming disaster?
I’ve read and enjoyed the previous two books in this quirky urban fantasy series – see my review of Under Ordshaw – so was keen to find out how it all gets sorted out. Review to follow.

 

My posts last week:

Review of Cleon Moon – Book 5 of The Fallen Empire series by Lindsay Buroker

Friday Faceoff featuring Use of Weapons – Book 3 of the Culture series by Iain M. Banks

Review of New Star Rising – Book 1 of the Indigo Reports by Cameron Cooper

Review of Castaway Planet – Book 4 of the Boundary series by Eric Flint and Ryk E. Spoor

Teaser Tuesday featuring Aurora by Kim Stanley Robinson

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of The Secret Library – Book 6 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

Sunday Post 17th November 2019

 

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Happy Friday! #ThePositivityWave #13 https://carlalovestoread.wordpress.com/2019/11/22/happy-friday-thepositivitywave-13-november-22/ Carla explains how she and her wonderful family turned what could have been a devastating anniversary into a celebration…

Travel Back in Time – Thanksgiving 1963 (excerpt from DOG BONE SOUP by Bette A. Stevens) https://4writersandreaders.com/2019/11/21/thanksgiving-1963-excerpt-from-dog-bone-soup/ This lovely extract is both poignant and funny and so I thought I’d share it with you.

The Guilty Reader Tag #Bookblogger #Bookbloggers #Bookblog #Blogger #Bloggers https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress.com/2019/11/20/the-guilty-reader-book-tag-bookblogger-bookbloggers-bookblog-blogger-bloggers/ Drew addresses these searching questions, designed to test his blogging rectitude with his customary seriousness—nah – who am I kidding? It’s a hoot…

Sci Fi Month 2019: THE BORDERS OF INFINITY by Lois McMaster Bujold #SciFiMonth https://spaceandsorcery.wordpress.com/2019/11/19/sci-fi-month-2019-the-borders-of-infinity-by-lois-mcmaster-bujold/ Sci Fi Month is in full swing and going brilliantly – and one of the highlights for me is the series of reviews written by Maddalena on the classic Vorkosigan Saga. Science fiction at its best really is allll about the characters – and what a character Miles Vorkosigan turns out to be!

Wordless Wednesday: Lillian https://applegategenealogy.wordpress.com/2019/11/20/wordless-wednesday-lillian/ I keep thinking about this photo. That smile is so wonderfully radiant – I hope she had a happy life…

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week.

Review of INDIE Ebook Cleon Moon – Book 5 of the Fallen Empire series by Lindsay Buroker #Brainfluffbookreview #CleonMoonbookreview #SciFiMonth2019

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I have been following this series and enjoying the unfolding adventure and likeable nonsense that accompanies all the various problems bedevilling disaster magnet Alisa Marchenko – see my review of the first book, Star Nomad. I am linking this review to Sci Fi Month 2019.

BLURB: Now that she’s retrieved the Staff of Lore, Captain Alisa Marchenko can finally dedicate herself and her ship to finding her kidnapped daughter. Her scant clues lead her to Cleon Moon. Unfortunately, since the fall of the empire, mafia clans have taken over the domed cities on the harsh moon, and exploring there isn’t easy. Even with the cyborg Leonidas at her side, Alisa struggles to survive vengeful mafia clans, rogue Starseers, and genetically engineered predators. To further complicate matters, she must worry about the ancient relic hidden on her ship, a beacon to anyone in the system who craves its power. If Alisa can’t navigate the moon’s chaos, she may lose her only chance to catch up with her daughter.

Alisa’s smart mouth is entertaining as the action gets hot and her adrenaline kicks in, while she finds herself in situations where she’d be better off heading in the opposite direction. The problem is, she’s looking for her eight-year-old daughter who was snatched by the infamous Starseers, telepaths with a dark history of trying to subdue the empire and use the bulk of the untalented population as serfs.

I also liked how the stories of the other main characters in the ship are also progressing – each adventure highlights one of the passengers so that we learn more about their backstory and/or continue to develop their character arc. This time around, it is aspiring chef, Beck, who is very much caught up in the action as he goes off to meet up with someone who might be interested in the sauces he makes… Meanwhile, Alisa has investigations of her own to make – where is Jelena, her daughter? If I have a slight grumble, is that she seems to be getting a tad too distracted with cyborg hunk, Leonidas, who she desires, rather than keeping focused on the search for her daughter. Meanwhile, her long-suffering engineer, Mica, keeps looking for a new position but somehow never getting around to leaving the ship and new-age, Yumi, with her rescued chickens, is also very excited at the prospect of landing on a moon where fungi is the main flora, given she knows how to make a drug from one of the rarer species…

Throw in dinosaur hunts, a knockabout space battle where weaving amongst the taller mushrooms is a thing and a devastating theft from their trusty ship, and the pages flew by so that I reached THE END with a sense of loss that this slice of the adventure is now over. I generally don’t embark on long-running series if I can avoid it – keeping up with them is too much like hard work. However, I have somehow reached the end of Book 5 of this whacky adventure without it seeming to be a big deal. And I’m definitely continuing with Book 6, Arkadian Skies – apart from anything else, this Indie series is very good value for money.

Recommended for fans of action-packed space opera, including a splash of romance.
8/10

Friday Faceoff – I send my words through Time and Space to greet you… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffFuturisticcovers #SciFiMonth2019

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this this week we are featuring FUTURISTIC covers. I’ve selected the classic sci fi adventure Use of Weapons – Book 3 of the Culture series by Iain M. Banks. I have linked this week’s Friday Faceoff to @SciFiMonth2019.

 

This edition was produced by Orbit in March 1993. I like the colour tones of the cover, but I’d like that cool, futuristic city to be more visible, rather than lurking in the background. And while I’m aware that it is Banks’ name that is selling the book, the title font is all but invisible in that colour against the background, the minute this cover gets minimised.

 

This French edition, published in November 2011 by Ailleurs & Demain, far more successfully evokes the feeling of a far future settlement. I love the use of those cool blues… This one would have been my favourite, but for that hideously ugly textbox plonked off-centre as a complete afterthought. What a shame!

 

Published by Le Livre de Poche in September 2007, this French edition is the reason why I picked this book for this subject. I love this scene with the huge mothership looming above with the nippy fighter craft zipping about and all those cool-looking futuristic weaponry on display. The title and author font has a pleasing synergy with the tone and feel of the cover design. I think this one nails it and is my favourite.

 

This Hungarian edition, published by Agave Könyvek in 2006, takes a different approach. I get the sense that you wouldn’t want to be sitting in that chair with all those nasty, sharp-looking armaments pointing at you… This cover radiates an effective sense of menace, but the title font is again, very underpowered when set against that punchy artwork.

 

This German edition, published in April 2015 by Heyne Verlag, is a great spacescape – what’s not to love? While it hasn’t got the cool detail of the French edition, it’s space, baby! And both author and title font also are effectively displayed and complement the design. Which is your favourite?