Tag Archives: thriller

Friday Faceoff – Hope is a thing with feathers… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceofffeathercovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is FEATHERS. I’ve selected The Devil’s Feather by Minette Walters as I think at least two of the covers are extraordinarily good…

 

This edition was produced by Alfred A. Knopf in August 2006 and is a strong contender. I love the drama of that red feather against the black background – a classic colour combination that always works well. For once, I’m not complaining about the rather ordinary white font, because with the red strands of feathers threaded through them, it gives that special lift so many title and author fonts lack. Overall, this classy offering is eye-catching and clever, with a strong clue as to the genre – what more could you ask from a cover?

 

Published in October 2006 by Pan Books (UK), this is also a really stylish design. The feather with the girl’s eye looking through is both arresting and original. I also very much like the author font – and given that is the book’s selling point, it makes sense to make that the major feature. However I’m less impressed with the chatter in the middle of the design, cluttering it up and diminishing the visual effect.

 

This edition, published by Macmillan in September 2005, shows what a huge impact colours can have. While the previous cover with the white background and tawny feather was eye-catching – this one with the black background and that single feather with the eye looking through is sheer class. Much as I love the first cover, this is the one that actually lifted the hair on the back of my neck. And no chatter across the cover to spoil that fabulous effect either!

 

This Dutch edition, produced by De Boekerij in 2006, is also an interesting cover. The view has the reader trapped behind a screen watching birds wheeling in the sky – the greenish hue and the whole design is really disturbing. While it isn’t my favourite, I do think it is effective at making me stop and look twice at what is going on. If I have a peeve, I think the small title font is underwhelming and an odd choice.

 

This Croatian edition, published in 2006 by Mozaik knjiga, is the most disappointing of all my choices and has more of a feel of someone let loose with photoshop. While a plain white background can be effective – as in the second choice – this time around it simply looks as if they couldn’t be bothered to add another layer of visual interest. And though I appreciate that the wing chopped off like that is supposed to somehow look wrong – it isn’t the right kind of wrongness, more that the design doesn’t hang together. Which is your favourite?

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*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of The Heart of the Circle by Keren Landsman #Brainfluffbookreview #TheHeartoftheCirclebookreview

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This one was recommended by one of my book blogging friends, so I scampered across to Netgalley and requested it. I’m so sorry I can’t recall who exactly it was who suggested it – but do please let me know and claim the glory – so I can heartily thank you…

Throughout human history there have always been sorcerers, once idolised and now exploited for their powers. In Israel, the Sons of Simeon, a group of religious extremists, persecute sorcerers while the government turns a blind eye. After a march for equal rights ends in brutal murder, empath, moodifier and reluctant waiter Reed becomes the next target. While his sorcerous and normie friends seek out his future killers, Reed complicates everything by falling hopelessly in love. As the battle for survival grows ever more personal, can Reed protect himself and his friends as the Sons of Simeon close in around them?

This book is set in Tel Aviv – Landsman is an Israeli author – and the different setting is just one of a range of aspects that sets this book apart. It is set in an alternate dystopian setting where magic-users around the world face a variety of measures designed to limit their freedom. In the US, they are forced to live in ghettos and while apparently Israeli society is more liberal, it doesn’t prevent many attacks on sorcerers, with most police turning a blind eye to such crimes. Reed is one of those fighting for equal rights for the magical community, putting himself at risk as he serves in a coffee bar. I found his edgy character, with his ability to read and diffuse people’s moods, appealing and sympathetic – even when he was being a bit of a prat, which is when you know the author has nailed her protagonist.

There is also a strong cast of supporting characters, notably his flatmate, Daphne, who is a seer. I like the gritty detail that people who can see into the future or become assailed with other people’s strong emotions are prone to depression and mental illness with a high suicide rate among them – it makes sense. I felt that Landsman had thought through carefully what would be the ongoing consequences for someone cursed with such a gift. In the middle of all this turbulence, Reed falls desperately, helplessly in love with another empath. His same-sex relationship with Lee, an American, grows steadily more intense throughout the book and described with passion and tenderness and while this isn’t principally a romance, this relationship plays a pivotal role in the narrative.

I burned through this book in just over two days, staying awake faaar too long to find out what happens next. I like Landsman’s layered characterisation and trick of writing a situation from the inside out – and would happily read anything else she has written. This is one of my favourite reads of the year so far and is highly recommended for anyone who likes reading about magical worlds with a difference. The ebook arc copy of The Heart of the Circle was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest opinion of the book.
10/10

Sunday Post – 11th August, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

I was AWOL last week, recovering from a big family wedding. my sister and nephew came to lunch. It was wonderful seeing my nephew – formerly a confirmed bachelor – walk up the aisle with someone so well suited – their happiness shone through. I had the privilege of giving one of the readings at the lovely service at Bournemouth Town Hall, followed by an enjoyable reception in Christchurch, where catching up with family was the bonus to celebrating this fabulous couple’s happiness. The only downside was the car journey there and back which made it a long day. Then last Sunday I finally finished working on Sally’s book – it was a gruelling five-hour session, but we both felt on a high at the end. On Monday, my sister and my other nephew – who’d been best man at the wedding – came over for a meal with us. It was a wonderful treat as I hadn’t had a chance to catch up with Michael for some time and he is excellent company.

On Tuesday, Himself and I relaxed, after doing the main shop and treated ourselves to lunch out. It was another hot, sunny day and we were also able to enjoy sitting in the garden as I played hooky from work. On Thursday, Frankie came to stay – Oscar stayed behind as his dad managed to get tickets for the Everton match this Saturday. So Friday saw us shopping till we dropped, swinging by Hobbycraft for art supplies as Frankie draws and paints and generally catching up. It seems a long time since I’ve seen him.

Last night we attended a performance of Fiddler on the Roof at the Alexandra Theatre in Bognor, braving stormforce winds to do so. It was worth it, especially as Tim was appearing. We thoroughly enjoyed the wonderful performances, haunting music and impressive production standard. Today we are planning to go up to Forbidden Planet in London so Frankie can check out their selection of manga books.

Last week I read:

The Heart of the Circle by Keren Landsman
Throughout human history there have always been sorcerers, once idolised and now exploited for their powers. In Israel, the Sons of Simeon, a group of religious extremists, persecute sorcerers while the government turns a blind eye. After a march for equal rights ends in brutal murder, empath, moodifier and reluctant waiter Reed becomes the next target. While his sorcerous and normie friends seek out his future killers, Reed complicates everything by falling hopelessly in love. As the battle for survival grows ever more personal, can Reed protect himself and his friends as the Sons of Simeon close in around them?
I thoroughly enjoyed this Netgalley arc – it’s always a joy when a book exceeds expectations and this one turned out to be an engrossing read unlike anything else I’ve read this year.

 

Heroes: Mortals and Monsters, Quests and Adventures – Book 2 of Stephen Fry’s Great Mythology series
Few mere mortals have ever embarked on such bold and heart-stirring adventures, overcome myriad monstrous perils, or outwitted scheming vengeful gods, quite as stylishly and triumphantly as Greek heroes. In this companion to his bestselling Mythos, Stephen Fry brilliantly retells these dramatic, funny, tragic and timeless tales. Join Jason aboard the Argo as he quests for the Golden Fleece. See Atalanta – who was raised by bears – outrun any man before being tricked with golden apples. Witness wily Oedipus solve the riddle of the Sphinx and discover how Bellerophon captures the winged horse Pegasus to help him slay the monster Chimera.
This enjoyable account of the Greek heroes who stepped up to rid the world of some of the monsters is a delight to listen to – every bit as good as Mythos

 

Novacene: The Coming Age of Hyperintelligence by James Lovelock
James Lovelock, creator of the Gaia hypothesis and the greatest environmental thinker of our time, has produced an astounding new theory about future of life on Earth. He argues that the anthropocene – the age in which humans acquired planetary-scale technologies – is, after 300 years, coming to an end. A new age – the novacene – has already begun.
This short book covers a lot of ground and gives a heady insight into the vision of one of the greatest thinkers of our age. Review to follow…

 

My posts last week:

Review of AUDIOBOOK The Dark Lord of Derkholm – Book 1 of the Derkholm series by Diana Wynne Jones

Friday Faceoff featuring How To Be a Pirate – Book 2 of the How to Train Your Dragon series by Cressida Cowell

Kindle Unlimited Promotion

Teaser Tuesday featuring The Heart of the Circle by Keren Landsman

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Favourite Fives – My Favourite Five Agatha Christie mysteries https://iwishilivedinalibrary.blogspot.com/2019/08/friday-fives-my-five-favorite-agatha.html?spref=tw This is an enjoyable meme, but what caught my eye was that some of Katherine’s selection were stories that I hadn’t read – what about you?

…a Writer’s work is never done… thankfully!… https://seumasgallacher.com/2019/08/09/a-writers-work-is-never-done-thankfully/ Successful indie author demonstrates the work ethic that has made helped him self publish a string of gripping Jack Calder thrillers.

Short story review: FIRE IN THE BONE by Ray Nayler https://spaceandsorcery.wordpress.com/2019/08/06/short-story-review-fire-in-the-bone-by-ray-nayler/ There is a link to this story – and since I’ve read it, I haven’t been able to get it out of my head… what a treat.

#AuthorInterview: #SFF #writer #AdrianTchaikovskydiscusses #writing #openinglines, #worldbuilding, and other bits of #writinglife. Thanks @aptshadow! https://jeanleesworld.com/2019/08/08/authorinterview-sff-writer-adriantchaikovsky-discusses-writing-openinglines-worldbuilding-and-other-bits-of-the-writinglife-thanks-aptshadow/ Top-notch interviewer Jean Lee quizzes talented SFF author Adrian Tchaikovsky on all things writing…

Thursday Doors – Goodbye Dublin https://jeanreinhardt.wordpress.com/2019/08/08/thursday-doors-goodbye-dublin/ I just love this quirky series – how does Jean find such a variety of wonderful doors?

Science Fiction in Kindle Unlimited https://books.bookfunnel.com/scifi-in-ku/4tecpf2y60 This is a book funnel promo I’m part of – if you are considering some sci fi goodness this summer, why not check out this selection?

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week…

Friday Faceoff – Adults are just outdated children… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is CHILDREN. I’ve selected Frozen in Time by Ali Sparkes, which is one of my favourite children’s books ever…

 

This edition was produced by Oxford University Press in January 2009 and is my favourite. I love the halo of supernatural light as the four children emerge from the underground bunker. If you look closely at the three children you can see clearly, you’ll see that two of them are dressed quite differently from the middle boy. I really like the fact that the artist has taken the trouble to depict the difference in their clothing, given it features so much in this timeslip adventure. I think it is plain from the cover that this is a science fiction adventure – another pluspoint for this polished, classy offering. It doesn’t hurt that this is the cover that I recall features on the audiobook, either.

 

Published in June 2013 by Oxford University Press, this retread isn’t quite so successful. While I like the artwork – I think it’s a real shame that over a third of the cover is given over to that intrusive, ugly text box. That marvellous font could easily have stood out against the forest canopy and looked more contemporary and interesting as a result.

 

This US edition, published by EgmontUSA in May 2010, so very nearly became my favourite. I love the fact that this one depicts the dramatic scene where the modern pair encounter their great aunt and uncle in suspended animation… But it’s a daft expression on Freddy’s face as he slowly surfaces in the chamber that ruins it for me. Other than that, I love the funky font and the marvellous artwork. This is definitely a contender…

 

This German edition, produced by Fischer KJB in November 2012, seems to have got their genres muddled. While there are some genuinely creepy moments in this fast-moving adventure, it is not a horror story – it is definitely a science fiction timeslip adventure with generous dollops of humour and some interesting things to say about how life has changed for children over the last fifty years. And this cover doesn’t give a hint of that.

 

This French edition, published in December 2016 by Bayard Jeunesse, has the feel of the old Enid Blyton books, which given the age of a couple of the children is more relevant than it might seem. What worries me is that I’m not sure this cover would attract modern independent readers as there is no sense of the smart, funny, thought-provoking writing in the artwork. Which is your favourite?

Sunday Post – 28th July, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

At last I have had a slightly easier week. I wasn’t teaching on Monday or Tuesday, though I had my very last Creative Writing course on Friday, when I was running my one-day Summer Surgery. It was a low-key affair with just six students so we were able to relax a bit as we heard people’s writing and discussed any writing issues. The mighty Ros, our wonderful admin assistant who has been unfailingly prompt, professional and supportive, presented me with a lovely bouquet of flowers that she had made for me. And in case you are now heartily sick of hearing about my leaving Northbrook – I promise that was my very last course for them, ever…

I painted the bathroom cupboard and towel rail this week, as well as made a start on sorting out the grandchildren’s rooms. We have broken the back of sorting out the toys they no longer play with and probably would have finished spring-cleaning their rooms, but we were coping with record-breaking heat as the temperature climbed to the high 70s and into the 80s during Wednesday and Thursday. Himself was struggling as he far prefers the cold and even I was finding it a bit of a struggle – the desk fans we have throughout the house were not up to job of keeping it remotely cool, especially as the back door had to be shut as that dangerous concrete canopy was removed. The builders have done a wonderful job – it came down with the minimum of mess and drama and having seen some of the horrible situations our former neighbours got into when tackling that job, I was very grateful. This coming week our new back door is due to be fitted.

Yesterday, my sister and I went into Chichester to shop for her son’s wedding next week. It went like a dream – she found a fabulous dress with matching jacket, shoes, handbag and fascinator as well as another dress, jacket and gorgeous sandals for the evening reception. Fortunately, I have a dress already in my wardrobe that will do – and today we collected a linen suit we ordered for Himself and added a shirt, belt, shoes and socks. It’s been a while since we have had a wedding in the family, so we are all really excited about it.

Last week I read:
The Orphans of Raspay – Book 7 of the Penric and Desdemona novella series by Lois McMaster Bujold
When the ship in which they are traveling is captured by Carpagamon island raiders, Temple sorcerer Penric and his resident demon Desdemona find their life complicated by two young orphans, Lencia and Seuka Corva, far from home and searching for their missing father. Pen and Des will need all their combined talents of mind and magic to unravel the mysteries of the sisters and escape from the pirate stronghold. This novella follows about a year after the events of The Prisoner of Limnos.
I thoroughly enjoyed this latest slice of the ongoing adventures of Penric and his demon as he struggles to free himself and two small girls caught by pirates who are planning to sell them into slavery.

 

Valkyrie Rising – Book 2 of the Hayden War Cycle by Evan Currie
Two years after the initial invasion of Hayden’s World, the newly reinforced Hayden Militia is in a state of stalemate with the remaining enemy forces but neither side is content to leave things at that. The alien alliance has dispatched their varsity to clean up the resistance on Hayden while the USF has officially activated Task Force V, the latest and most advanced combat ships built by humans. In the end there are some things you decide in the skies, but some can only be settled in the mud.
This military science fiction series continues with the second book, where events go on ramping up as those dastardly aliens show no sign of going home…

 

A Room Full of Bones – Book 4 of the Ruth Galloway series by Elly Griffiths
On Halloween night, the Smith Museum in King’s Lynn is preparing for an unusual event — the opening of a coffin containing the bones of a medieval bishop. But when forensic archaelogist Ruth Galloway arrives to supervise, she finds a nasty surprise waiting for her…
Listening to this one on audiobook, it is my favourite book in this series so far as I just love the way the occult is so skilfully entwined amongst the action in this classy police procedural.

 

Whom Shall I Fear? by Anne Clare
All that Sergeant James Milburn wants is to heal. Sent to finish his convalescence in a lonely village in the north of England, the friends he’s lost haunt his dreams. If he can only be declared fit for active service again, perhaps he can rejoin his surviving mates in the fight across Sicily and either protect them or die alongside them.

All that Evie Worther wants is purpose. War has reduced her family to an elderly matriarch and Charles, her controlling cousin, both determined to keep her safely tucked away in their family home. If she can somehow balance her sense of obligation to family with her desperate need to be of use, perhaps she can discover how she fits into her tumultuous world.

All that Charles Heatherington wants is his due. Since his brother’s death, he is positioned to be the family’s heir with only one step left to make his future secure. If only he can keep the family matriarch happy, he can finally start living the easy life he is certain he deserves.

However, when James’s, Evie’s and Charles’s paths collide, a dark secret of the past is forced into the light, and everything that they have hoped and striven for is thrown into doubt.
This engrossing WWII thriller gives us a real taste of the terrible Italian campaign, in amongst a threat other than the German guns in this well-written page-turner. Review to follow.

 

The Dry – Book 1 of the Aaron Falk series by Jane Harper
After getting a note demanding his presence, Federal Agent Aaron Falk arrives in his hometown for the first time in decades to attend the funeral of his best friend, Luke. Twenty years ago when Falk was accused of murder, Luke was his alibi. Falk and his father fled under a cloud of suspicion, saved from prosecution only because of Luke’s steadfast claim that the boys had been together at the time of the crime. But now more than one person knows they didn’t tell the truth back then, and Luke is dead. Amid the worst drought in a century, Falk and the local detective question what really happened to Luke. As Falk reluctantly investigates to see if there’s more to Luke’s death than there seems to be, long-buried mysteries resurface, as do the lies that have haunted them. And Falk will find that small towns have always hidden big secrets.
I can see why this debut crime thriller caused such a fuss – I spent most of a warm evening engrossed in this one instead of tackling a stack of chores that needed doing. Review to follow.

 

The Forgotten Palace: An adventure in Presadia by Luke Aylen
Deep in the heart of Presadia’s Great Forest lie many secrets, including the ancient ruins of a once-magnificent palace. A chance encounter with a bedraggled stranger and the discovery of broken shards of a magical mirror lead Antimony, an unusually tall dwarf, on a journey of discovery.
It took me a while to get into this entertaining children’s fantasy adventure – but once I got into the world and the flashbacks ceased, it proved to be great fun. I shall certainly consider reading this one to my grandson next year…

 

 

How To Steal a Dragon’s Sword AUDIOBOOK – Book 9 of the How To Train a Dragon series by Cressida Cowell
Viking Berk heir Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III and his dragon, Toothless are target of dragon rebellion — filled with the meanest Razor-wings, Tonguetwisters, and Vampire Ghouldeaths. Only a King can save them, a champion with all of the King’s Lost Things. Hiccup will have to outwit a witch, fight his arch-enemy, and beat back an army of bloodthirsty dragons with just one sword.
I have read and reviewed this one, but this time around I had the pleasure of listening to David Tennant’s wonderful narration of the audiobook edition.

 

My posts last week:

Friday Faceoff featuring The Opposite House by Helen Oyeyemi

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of INDIE NOVELLA The Orphans of Raspay – Book 7 of the Penric and Desdemona series by Lois McMaster Bujold

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

Teaser Tuesday featuring Valkyrie Rising – Book 2 of the Haydon War Cycle series by Evan Currie

Review of INDIE Ebook Honor’s Flight – Book 2 of the Fallen Empire series by Lindsay Buroker

Sunday Post – 21st July 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

Peanut Butter in the Middle, a New Release Children’s Book https://wandaluthman.wordpress.com/2019/07/22/peanut-butter-in-the-middle-a-new-release-childrens-book/ This is a book about and for the middle sibling, who often struggles to define their relationship within the family…

Does Gotham Need Batman? http://melfka.com/archives/16468 Joanna raises an intriguing issue in this thoughtful article about the role of the lantern-jawed hero versus those colourful villains.

10 Book Settings I Need More of in my Reading Life https://thebookishlibra.com/2019/07/23/top-ten-tuesday-10-book-settings-i-need-more-of-in-my-reading-life/ Suzanne, whose book review blog I enjoy following, listed her favourite settings – which had me wondering which ones I particularly enjoy. What about you?

Voting for the Hugo Awards https://earthianhivemind.net/2019/07/23/voting-for-the-hugo-awards/ Stephanie gives us the shortlist for this year’s Hugo Awards as it is now time to vote.

Author Jean Lee Interviews…Me! https://thenaptimeauthor.wordpress.com/2019/07/03/author-jean-lee-interviews-me/ No – confusingly, this is not me – it is book blogger Anne Clare discussing the interview with Jean about the release of her debut novel. It was this interview that prompted me to pop along to Amazon and buy a copy… And I’m very glad I did.

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week…

Friday Faceoff – Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow creeps in this petty pace… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is ABANDONED BUILDINGS, so I’ve selected a post-apocalyptic read, Tomorrow and Tomorrow by Tom Sweterlitsch.

 

This hardback edition was produced by G.P. Putnam’s Sons in July 2014 is a really interesting cover as it features a mirror design with two different skylines of Pittsburgh. The interesting thing to note is that the post-apocalyptic world is the one where the air is fresher and the sky is blue, whereas the pre-apocalypse scene depicts large chimneys belching out smoke to the extent that the vista is a sickly yellow. This one is my favourite as I also really love the treatment of the font.

 

Published in May 2015 by Berkley, this cover features the protagonist’s wife. It’s an interesting cover, especially as parts of her image is starting to disintegrate – which is a clever reference to one of the main themes in the book. I would have liked this cover more if there wasn’t quite so much chatter cluttering up a strong, eye-catching design.

 

This edition, published by Headline in July 2014, is another strong contender, this time focusing on the protagonist, John Dominic Blaxton. I love the way this outline is tilted and we then get paler copies of him in various attitudes of his former life – a cool reference to the book. I think this cover gives a strong clue about the genre, which is a big plus in its favour. Once again, the font is done well and it was a close-run thing between this one and the first cover as to which was my favourite.

 

Produced by Heyne Verlag in April 2015, this German edition is eye-catching and effective. The twisting building reflected and fractured in the mirrored background provide big clues as to the futuristic aspect of the genre, which is always a major plus. Once again, I love the treatment of the font, which works well. My one grizzle is that I would have liked a greater colour contrast between that twisting building and the background which would have given a cover with more visual impact.

 

This Polish edition, published by Buchmann in March 2015, goes back to the shattered landscape of Pittsburgh. I love the silhouette of John against the dramatic cityscape as the title reaches into the boiling clouds. It works really well. This week there isn’t a bad cover here, so it’s all a question of personal preference – this is another one that could easily have been my favourite. So this week in particular, I’m fascinated to see which cover is your favourite – do let me know!

#Sunday Post – 5th August, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Frances and I had a lovely weekend away with my parents last week – they were amazed at just how grown up she is. We returned home on Sunday and had the pleasure of Frances’ company until Wednesday, when she returned home. The house seems very quiet without her… Though it’s just as well, as I went down with a cold the following day, spending most of the day in bed and was still struggling when my lovely friend Mhairi spent the day with me on Friday. I’m on the mend, at least I’m now able to work.

I have been busy working through the edits on Netted and editing Mantivore Dreams. Other than that, not much else given my cold and the steaming temperatures.

This week I have read:

The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar
One September evening in 1785, the merchant Jonah Hancock hears urgent knocking on his front door. One of his captains is waiting eagerly on the step. He has sold Jonah’s ship for what appears to be a mermaid.
Beautifully written with a very well depicted historical setting. I’ll be reviewing this one in the coming week.

 

 

Like Never and Always by Anne Aguirre
On a hot summer night, a screech of brakes and shattering glass changes two lives forever.

Liv wakes in the hospital, confused when they call her Morgan. She assumes it’s a case of mistaken identity, yet when the bandages come off, it’s not her face in the mirror anymore. It’s her best friend Morgan’s. Morgan always seemed to have the perfect life, yet Liv must navigate endlessly disturbing secrets of the criminal and murderous variety—and a romance that feels like a betrayal. Torn between the boy she loved as Liv and the boy she’s grown to love as Morgan, Liv still has to survive Morgan’s last request.
Engrossing YA thriller with plenty of twists and turns featuring a likeable protagonist – review to follow in due course.

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 29th July 2018

Review of The Great Alone by Kristen Hannah

Teaser Tuesday featuring The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring Hidden Sun – Book 1 of the Shadowlands series by Jaine Fenn

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Like Never and Always by Anne Aguirre

Friday Face-off – Had I the heaven’s embroidered cloths… featuring The Space Between the Stars by Anne Corlett

Review of Crossways – Book 2 of the Psi-Tech series by Jacey Bedford

Instafreebie Giveaway – LEGION – Women Authors of Sci-Fi

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Best applications for writing https://earthianhivemind.net/2018/08/03/best-applications-writing/ A really helpful list of writing aids for those of us who do a fair amount of it…

Fun Fact Friday with Franky’s Fun Flamingo Facts https://wandaluthman.wordpress.com/2018/08/03/fun-fact-friday-with-frankys-fun-flamingo-facts-5/ I’ve grown really fond of this little nuggets of information about flamingos – and this week’s continues the alliterative theme!

Self Care Isn’t a Want https://girlof1000wonders.wordpress.com/2018/08/03/self-care-isnt-a-want/ This excellent article is dear to my own heart – note the ranting comment I leave…

Kanazawa’s Higashi Chaya District – Traveling in Japan 2018 series https://www.spajonas.com/2018/08/03/kanazawas-higashi-chaya-district-traveling-in-japan-2018-series/ Travelling via my computer is always a treat and this travelogue, including a delightful video, is a gem.

Everyone interested in time travel, meet here yesterday https://blogging807.wordpress.com/2018/08/03/everyone-interested-in-time-travel-meet-here-yesterday/ And this set of time travel jokes had me cackling with laughter…

Thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site and have a great week.

Review of KINDLE Ebook #Bound – Book 8 of the #Alex Verus series by #Benedict Jacka #bookreview #Brainfluffbookreview

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This excellent series has been frequently compared to the Harry Dresden Files – and there are similarities. The protagonists both had bumpy childhoods where their abilities were exploited and are therefore edgy and distrustful. But where Harry is just plain powerful, Alex Verus is relatively weak as his ability lies in being able to see into the future, though only by a handful of seconds, sometimes stretching into minutes. That, so far, has been enough to keep him alive… As the series is now stretching forward and getting steadily darker, is it still as enjoyable as when it started?

Alex Verus can see the future. But he never thought he’d see this day. Manoeuvred by forces beyond his control, the probability mage has made a terrible choice: he’s agreed to work for his old master once more. Richard Drakh, the sadistic dark mage Alex escaped as an apprentice, has him in his clutches again. And this time, he won’t let go so easily.

While I have always enjoyed this series, – see my review of Fated – I think the last couple of books have nocked up the tension and pace so that once I started reading, they were difficult to put down. Moreover, if you have randomly picked this one up intending to read it, while you inevitably will have missed huge chunks of the backstory, given this is the eighth book in the series, you wouldn’t unduly flounder. Told in first person viewpoint, Alex’s terse narrative does a good job of explaining the stakes and any necessary information for new readers. I’m not sure if this book is specifically designed as an entry point to the series, but I think it could certainly work like that.

I used to wish I had magical abilities – but I’m very relieved I haven’t, if Jacka’s take on the British magical community is anything like the reality. The Council deals with policing mages and are supposed to be Light mages. But having witnessed the very rough justice they hand out with little accountability, it is clear they aren’t much better than the Dark mages, who are supposed to be the villains. Alex has spent all his adult life trying to stay out of the clutches of his former mentor, the powerful and very unpleasant Richard Drakh – and at the start of this book, he is right back where he didn’t want to be…

The world is well depicted with strong supporting characters who ping off the page, but what elevates this book from the rest is Jacka’s handling of Alex’s prescient abilities, particularly in a fight. I think the description and manner in which this particular talent works is just plain brilliant and if you enjoyed the Harry Desden Files, then give this series a go. It comes very highly recommended.
9/10

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of KINDLE Ebook #Before Mars – Book 3 of the #Planetfall series by #Emma Newman #bookreview #Brainfluffbookblog

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When done well, there is no genre I love more than science fiction – I’m not sure why except there is something about a cracking well-told tale out in the stars that speaks uniquely to my soul… I loved Planetfall and After Atlas – so would this final instalment live up to the astonishing standard Newman has set so far?

After months of travel, Anna Kubrin finally arrives on Mars for her new job as a geologist and de facto artist-in-residence. Already she feels like she is losing the connection with her husband and baby at home on Earth–and she’ll be on Mars for over a year. Throwing herself into her work, she tries her best to fit in with the team. But in her new room on the base, Anna finds a mysterious note written in her own handwriting, warning her not to trust the colony psychologist. A note she can’t remember writing. She unpacks her wedding ring, only to find it has been replaced by a fake.

Once again what hooked and then held me, is Newman’s nuanced and layered characterisation. I found Anna a deeply poignant character, who ends up on Mars as much because she is escaping her former life, rather than due to the fact that joining the tiny colony has been a lifetime’s achievement. Her struggles to come to terms with her post-natal depression, which prevented her from fully bonding with her baby really held me – it is an issue which isn’t written about nearly enough in SFF. Kudos to Newman for providing such a sympathetic, poignant insight into the struggles some women encounter in the weeks, months and years after having a baby.

I’m conscious that I’ve managed to make this one sound like it’s all about a rather broken woman wandering around and agonising about the baby she has left behind on Earth. While that is a minor story strand – actually, this book is a tense thriller whereby the newest visitor to a small scientific community cannot shake the sense that something is very badly wrong… I had figured out some of what is going on – but as ever, Newman has a number of other twists I didn’t see coming.

In addition, there is a strong supporting cast featuring the other characters who are also on the Mars base alongside Anna. I really appreciate the fact that there are no out and out villains – and the one character who has not behaved particularly well comes across as weak and out of their depth, rather than evil. As ever, after I put this one down, I found myself constantly thinking about it – and wondering how I’d feel in the same situation.

Like the other two books, this one can comfortably be read as a standalone. In fact, I’m not sure it wouldn’t be more satisfactory to do so – after that amazing cliff-hanger ending of After Atlas I kept waiting for the shoe to drop. I generally don’t reread anything – there are too many other fabulous books out there waiting for me. But this is the first time in a long while I’ve been strongly tempted to read through the whole trilogy, one after the other… Highly recommended for anyone who loves a gripping adventure featuring a well written, complex protagonist.
10/10

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of KINDLE Ebook Into the Fire – Book 2 of Vatta’s Peace by Elizabeth Moon

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I loved Cold Welcome which was one of my favourite books of 2017 – see my review here, so I was really excited when this second book in the series was published.

When Admiral Kylara Vatta and a ship full of strangers were marooned on an inhospitable arctic island, they uncovered secrets that someone on Ky’s planet was ready to kill to keep hidden. Now, the existence of the mysterious arctic base has been revealed, but the organisation behind it still lurks in the shadows, doing all it can to silence her. It is up to the intrepid Ky to force the perpetrators into the light and uncover decades’ worth of secrets – some of which lie at the very heart of her family’s greatest tragedy.

If you haven’t yet had the pleasure of reading Cold Welcome, then I suggest you put this one on hold and track it down, because the story carries on almost seamlessly from that first adventure featuring Ky Vatta and the other hapless passengers who crashed into the sea with her. However, this story also includes a lot of the characters who featured in Moon’s previous series, Vatta’s War. As I have read all the books in this space opera adventure series, I was delighted to meet up with characters whom I regarded as old friends. Himself, who only read the first book, found he was floundering at bit at the start.

I found this story to be gripping and tension-filled as Ky finds herself once more in the middle of a mess of trouble. This time though, she is back home where she should feel safe. I really liked the fact that she was once more confronted with a situation where she didn’t know who to trust. Moon is very good at building the tension and providing an atmosphere of suspicion. It seems particularly hard on the poor souls who endured all sorts of hardships, while struggling to survive in desperate conditions, only also to face imprisonment where they are drugged into drooling helplessness.

One aspect I appreciated is that now she is back home, Ky finds she has to deal with her cousin, Stella. The two don’t particularly get on, mostly because they clashed a lot during their teens. The cliché would be that because they are Family and under threat, the two young women would suddenly pull together – and it was refreshing that Moon sidesteps that wornout trope and provides us with a more interesting and believable dynamic. The other main character who faces a crisis is Grace, who in theory, as Rector of the planet, should be well guarded and entirely capable of coping with any threat to her leadership. Events prove otherwise.

The story is fast-moving, with plenty going on. And unlike Cold Welcome, the viewpoint swings between a larger cast of main characters, both protagonists and villains. Moon is deft at quickly establishing sympathetic characters and making me care about what happens to them and I found myself caught up in the plot, reluctant to put the book down until I knew what happens next. Of course, with such a steady build-up in tension, the climax of the book has to really matter and Moon succeeds in producing plenty of action as both sides make their move. I thoroughly enjoyed this one and will be eagerly looking out for the next book in this engaging series. This is recommended for fans of science fiction thrillers – though ideally, you should first read the Vatta’s War series and Cold Welcome.
9/10