Tag Archives: the Miles Vorkosigan series

Covet the Covers – 11 #Brainfluffcovetthecovers #CovetthecoversLoisMcMasterBujold #SciFiMonth2020

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Welcome to another helping of Covet the Covers, aka Cover Love. This week I’m featuring Lois McMaster Bujold’s Miles Vorkosigan science fiction covers in honour of #Sci Fi Month 2020, which I’m linking to this post.

We are both huge fans of her writing – check out my reviews of Cryoburn, Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen and The Flowers of Vashnoi, which are all part of this long-running, highly successful space opera adventure that helped to redefine the genre into something more nuanced and interesting. Bujold showed herself years ahead of many of her contemporaries in following the fortunes of a highly driven, alpha male desperate to prove himself when growing up in a warrior-caste society, while coping with significant physical disabilities. His paternal grandfather had wanted him to be quietly euthanised as a baby… My favourite is the cover for Cryoburn – which is yours?


Friday Faceoff – These mist covered mountains…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is couples, so I’ve chosen Brothers in Arms – Book 5 of the Miles Vorkosigan series by Lois McMaster Bujold.

 

This is the cover produced by Baen Book in November 2001. I like the pulp feel that is Baen’s trademark and I think this is one of their best offerings. The figures reclining in the middle of the cover relate directly to the content inside, as does the disembodied faces. I also really like the title font and the manner in which the author’s name is also featured – nifty and elegantly done. If I could change anything, I’d do away with the chatter, but you can’t have everything.

 

And this is what Baen came up with in January 2008. Oh dear. What a sad, lacklustre affair when compared with the quirky excellence of seven years earlier… The figures are poorly detailed and that polka-dotted background doesn’t even convince as a starscape!

 

This is more like it! Published in January 2007 by Blackstone Audiobooks, I really like the detail of the cockpit here, with the reflection of the pilot looking out towards the approaching planet. This gives the sense of the action and drama that this book brims with in an attractive, evocative setting. This is my favourite.

 

Produced in October 1996 by Wilhelm Heyne Verlag, this German edition is very simple. The cover is clearly a play on the title and a reference to Miles’ two identities. It is very simple and the rather washed-out skyscape gives a sense of the genre, but is surprisingly effective. I’d certainly pick it up to have another look, although I don’t like the depiction of Miles – I think he looks cruel.

 

This edition, published in August 2008 by Nesta Press, once more gives us a slice of the action. I like the artwork and the drama, while the blues and greys work well to draw the eye and encourage me to take another look. Again, this is a deliberate attempt to hark back to the pulp editions of early science fiction novels and successfully informs the browsing reader of the genre. Which is your favourite?

 

ANNDDD…

 

Steph at Earthian Hivemind interviews me about my writing and my debut novel…