Tag Archives: The Invisible Library

Review of KINDLE Ebook The Invisible Library – Book 1 of the Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

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I have read a steady stream of positive reviews for this book – and being a bibliophile myself, I treated myself to this one a while ago… It was high time I got around to it, so I did.

Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, which harvests fiction from different realities. And along with her enigmatic assistant Kai, she’s posted to an alternative London. Their mission – to retrieve a dangerous book. But when they arrive, it’s already been stolen. London’s underground factions seem prepared to fight to the very death to find her book. Adding to the jeopardy, this world is chaos-infested – the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic. Irene’s new assistant is also hiding secrets of his own. Soon, she’s up to her eyebrows in a heady mix of danger, clues and secret societies. Yet failure is not an option – the nature of reality itself is at stake.

I really enjoyed Irene’s character – brought up knowing that she would eventually always work for the Library as her parents were both Librarians, she is slightly apart from many of her colleagues. She is also cool-headed and used to keeping her own counsel – quite different from many of the rather emotional protagonists we are used to seeing in fantasy adventure. I enjoyed watching her character progress throughout the book, particularly as she has to accept that the Library might not be as principled about using its hapless employees as she likes to think.

She is supported by her new assistant Kai, who is something of a puzzle. Cogman nicely builds up the tension as Irene struggles in a hostile world someone alongside that she does not fully trust. I really enjoyed Cogman’s trick of presenting us with the situation only for us to discover that all is not what it seems – my favourite kind of storytelling. The pacing and steady increase in the stakes and danger level of this adventure is very well handled. Given the rigorous rules Irene has to abide by and the particular way the world works, it would have been all too easy for the tension to trickle away in wordy explanations. Cogman avoids this trap with the dexterity of someone who clearly knows what she is doing.

Having wound up the story so that I stayed up way too late to find out what would happen next, the climax had to be something special. And it is. We have a nicely nasty antagonist who I outright hated and will clearly continue to pose all sorts of dark threats in later books. Several other book bloggers have mentioned how as soon as they completed The Invisible Library, they immediately went on to read the second book in the series, The Masked City. If I had had the second book to hand. I would certainly have done the same thing. As it is, I have ordered it from the library (sadly not the invisible variety) and look forward to reading the next slice of Irene’s adventure very soon. Highly recommended.
9/10

Discovery Challenge 2017 and Tackling My TBR – June Roundup

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After reading Jo Hall’s post on the problems women authors have with getting discovered, I’ve been taking part in the challenge to read and review at least 24 books by female authors each year that were previously unknown to me for the last two years. During June, I read three books towards my 2017 Discovery Challenge, which brings my annual number of books written by women writers I hadn’t read before to nineteen. They are:

River of Teeth – Book 1 of the River of Teeth novella series by Sarah Gailey
In the early 20th Century, the United States government concocted a plan to import hippopotamuses into the marshlands of Louisiana to be bred and slaughtered as an alternative meat source. This is true. Other true things about hippos: they are savage, they are fast, and their jaws can snap a man in two. This was a terrible plan. Contained within this volume is an 1890s America that might have been: a bayou overrun by feral hippos and mercenary hippo wranglers from around the globe. It is the story of Winslow Houndstooth and his crew. It is the story of their fortunes. It is the story of his revenge.
This is a real roller-coaster ride with plenty of mayhem and violence along the way. That said, there is also a large dollop of humour amid the tension – think of The Magnificent Seven set in a swamp with hippos. See my review here.

Sherlock Mars by Jackie Kingon
Molly Marbles runs a successful bistro on terraformed Mars. But a virtual restaurant opens near her place, offering the experience of delicacies from across the Solar System with none of the calories. What will this do to her business? Then its owner is murdered in her kitchen. Molly, an amateur detective, springs into action to help the police solve the mystery, while also planning her pop-star daughter’s wedding, keeping her kitchen staff from feuding, and protecting her cyborg friend from the humans-only mob. Meanwhile, the infamous Cereal Serial Killer has escaped prison on Pluto and has everyone worried. Things are getting hectic, but Molly is a resilient and resourceful woman. And her knack for mysteries sees her nick-named ‘Sherlock Mars’.
This is basically a cosy mystery set in space. It has the classic ingredients – a victim that no one seems to care all that much about; a quirky, successful restaurant owner who inexplicably has sufficient time to shoot off here, there and everywhere to run down a number of clues; a friendly law enforcement officer who is happy to let Molly have crucial details of the ongoing case; lots of foodie details along the way. See my review here.

The Invisible Library – Book 1 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Gogman
Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, which harvests fiction from different realities. And along with her enigmatic assistant Kai, she’s posted to an alternative London. Their mission – to retrieve a dangerous book. But when they arrive, it’s already been stolen. London’s underground factions seem prepared to fight to the very death to find her book. Adding to the jeopardy, this world is chaos-infested – the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic. Irene’s new assistant is also hiding secrets of his own. Soon, she’s up to her eyebrows in a heady mix of danger, clues and secret societies. Yet failure is not an option – the nature of reality itself is at stake.
I really enjoyed Irene’s character – brought up knowing that she would eventually always work for the Library as her parents were both Librarians, she is slightly apart from many of her colleagues. She is also cool-headed and used to keeping her own counsel – quite different from many of the rather emotional protagonists we are used to seeing in fantasy adventure. Review to follow.

I also managed to clear two books from my TBR pile. They are:

The Dog Walker – Book 5 of The Detective’s Daughter series by Lesley Thomson
January, 1987. In the depths of winter, only joggers and dog walkers brave the Thames towpath after dark. Helen Honeysett, a young newlywed, sets off for an evening run from her riverside cottage and disappears. Twenty-nine years later, Helen’s body has never been found. Her husband has asked Stella Darnell, a private detective, and her side-kick Jack Harmon, to find out what happened all those years ago. But when the five households on that desolate stretch of towpath refuse to give up their secrets, Stella and Jack find themselves hunting a killer whose trail has long gone cold.
I thoroughly enjoyed this one. Thomson’s atmospheric writing this time around has taken us to another obscure corner of London – she seems to specialise in those – where a crime was committed that shatters one family and blights the lives of others, including the husband of the victim. See my review here.

The Invisible Library – Book 1 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
See above

This means I’ve managed to clear thirty-two books from my teetering TBR pile so far this year – a lot better than last year so far. Have you read any of the above books? If so, what did you think?

Sunday Post – 2nd July 2017

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Book Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Last Sunday was the day before my birthday – so my daughter and partner took us out for a lovely meal at a local restaurant with an excellent vegetarian menu – we had a marvellous time.

On the day of my birthday, I had to teach both morning and evening, but I had lunch with my sister and granddaughter who had the day off to school. As requested, I’ve had some photos taken of me on my new swing – my present from Himself – showing my new purple hair-do. I’m delighted with it😊.

On Wednesday, I attended Pilates and Fitstep, had lunch with a friend and dropped in on my sister – and I can’t tell you how good it feels to write that… It was Writing Group on Wednesday evening. As I’ve been out and about rather a lot, I caught up on admin during the day and in the evening, my sister invited us over for a meal. Friday found me working at Tim’s.

Yesterday, I was busy cooking for a gathering of the clan – with vegetarians and vegans attending my birthday bash, I made some Marmite twists, vegan cheese straws, apple slices, flapjack and vegan pizza. And today I’m having a birthday party with all the family – so apologies for not being around much to respond on the blog. Hopefully after today, life will get back to normal.

This week I have read:

How To Stop Time by Matt Haig
Tom Hazard has a dangerous secret. He may look like an ordinary 41-year-old, but owing to a rare condition, he’s been alive for centuries. From Elizabethan England to Jazz Age Paris, from New York to the South Seas, Tom has seen a lot, and now craves an ordinary life. Always changing his identity to stay alive, Tom has the perfect cover – working as a history teacher at a London comprehensive. Here he can teach the kids about wars and witch hunts as if he’d never witnessed them first-hand. He can try and tame the past that is fast catching up with him. The only thing Tom mustn’t do is fall in love.
This is an intriguing premise which Haig weaves into a fascinating story about an old, old man who is tired of life. And whatever he does – he mustn’t fall in love… I loved this one and will be reviewing it later this month.

Eleventh Hour – Book 8 of the Kit Marlowe series by M.J. Trow
April, 1590. The queen’s spymaster, Sir Francis Walsingham, is dead, leaving a dangerous power vacuum. His former right hand man, Nicholas Faunt, believes he was poisoned and has ordered Kit Marlowe to discover who killed him. To find the answers, Marlowe must consult the leading scientists and thinkers in the country. But as he questions the members of the so-called School of Night, the playwright-turned-spy becomes convinced that at least one of them is hiding a deadly secret. If he is to outwit the most inquiring minds in Europe and unmask the killer within, Marlowe must devise an impossibly ingenious plan.
This is great fun – an historical whodunit set in Elizabethan times featuring a famous playwright and a number of other well-known figures, though not necessarily as you’ve seen them depicted before. I’m delighted to have requested this one from Netgalley – it is a cracking read and I’ll be definitely tracking down more in this series.

The Invisible Library – Book 1 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
Irene is a professional spy for the mysterious Library, which harvests fiction from different realities. And along with her enigmatic assistant Kai, she’s posted to an alternative London. Their mission – to retrieve a dangerous book. But when they arrive, it’s already been stolen. London’s underground factions seem prepared to fight to the very death to find her book. Adding to the jeopardy, this world is chaos-infested – the laws of nature bent to allow supernatural creatures and unpredictable magic. Irene’s new assistant is also hiding secrets of his own.
Having read a number of glowing reviews from fellow book bloggers, I’d acquired this one a while ago – and finally decided to read it. It’s a great alternate world adventure and I’ll be soon tucking into the next instalment as I’ve now ordered it from the local library (sadly not the invisible variety – but we can’t have everything…).

My posts last week:
Sunday Post – 25th June 2017

Review of The Dog Walker – Book 5 of The Detective’s Daughter series by Lesley Thomson

Teaser Tuesday featuring Eleventh Hour – Book 8 of the Kit Marlowe series by M.J. Trow

Review of Scarlet – Book 2 of the Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

Review of Star Wars: The Dark – Book 4 of the Adventures in Wild Space series by Tom Huddleston

Friday Face-off – I collect hats. That’s what you do when you’re bald. featuring The Martian by Andy Weir

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Sherlock Mars by Jackie Kingon

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Please Support Your Favourite Authors  https://gaslightcrime.wordpress.com/2017/06/25/please-support-your-favourite-authors/ This short article just reminds readers how they can help their authors to be able to keep writing.

Fantasy Maps, Book Launches and Chris Pratt!  https://sophieetallis.wordpress.com/2017/06/28/fantasy-maps-book-launches-and-chris-pratt/  This well-told article from talented author and artist, and fellow Grimmie author Sophie Tallis describes how her adventures in attending a book launch brought about an epiphany…

What’s Making Me Happy: June 2017  https://saraletourneauwriter.com/2017/06/29/happiness-june-2017/  I love the idea of writing a regular celebratory article – and Sara has done it really well.

Top Ten Historical Novels Worth Reading (more than once) http://earthianhivemind.net/2017/06/25/ten-historical-fiction-novels-worth-reading/  An excellent list for those of you who enjoy quality historical fiction

Lessons Learned from Agatha Christie: How Much Stock Should One Put into a Title? https://jeanleesworld.com/2017/06/29/lessons-learned-from-agatha-christie-how-much-stock-should-one-put-into-a-title/  Another enjoyable and thought provoking article from Jean on a subject that has most authors losing sleep.

Thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site and may you have a great week.