Tag Archives: The Green Man’s Heir

My Top Ten Favourite Reads of 2018 So Far… #Brainfluffbookblog

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Now that we are more than halfway through 2018, what are my standout reads? So far this year, I’ve read 73 books and in no particular order, my top 10 favourites of the year so far are:-

The Stone Sky – Book 3 of The Broken Earth trilogy by N.K. Jemisin
This whole series blew me away. The extraordinary viewpoint and the worldbuilding that takes a science fiction premise and pushes it right to the edge. It has an epic fantasy feel with a strong family dynamic and remarkable characters – and perhaps most important, concluded this series with sufficient drama and conviction.

 

 

The Hyperspace Trap by Christopher G. Nuttall
This space opera adventure, set on an intergalactic cruise-ship liner, was an unusual and riveting setting for this alien encounter. I liked the fact that the protagonists came from both the crew and passengers and enjoyed the growing tension as things slid away into a major emergency.

 

 

Blunt Force Magic by Lawrence Davis
I loved this one. A half-trained apprentice with loads of ability and no finesse finds himself having to stand against formidable antagonists. The chippy narrator and gritty take on this well-trodden path made this a memorably enjoyable read.

 

 

The Bitter Twins – Book 2 of The Winnowing Flame trilogy by Jen Williams
I’ve been a fan of Williams’ vibrant, energetic prose since I picked up The Copper Promise, but this one is an awesome braiding of both science fiction and fantasy. No mid-book slump here!

 

 

 

The Cold Between – Book 1 of the Central Corps novels by Elizabeth Bonesteel
This space opera focuses on the characters with ferocious intensity and we get a ringside seat as layered, plausible people grapple with their own lives in amongst the stars. Needless to say, there is also politics, greed and the need for revenge and love blended to make this one unputdownable once I’d started.

 

 

The Green Man’s Heir by Juliet McKenna
This is one of the reading highlights of the year so far. Set in England and steeped in the myths and folklore of this ancient land, the story follows the fortunes of a half-dryad man trying to trace his lineage. Needless to say, he is pitchforked into the middle of something dangerous and old…

 

 

 

Head On – Book 2 of the Lock In series by John Scalzi
I loved the first book in this futuristic crime series, Lock In, where victims of a terrible illness leaving them completely paralysed are able to upload their consciousness into robotic bodies. Our protagonist is now working for the police, investigating the murder of a sporting star, who plays a savage version of American football. Mayhem and action all the way…

 

 

 

Before Mars – Book 3 of the Planetfall series by Emma Newman
I’ve loved every one of these stories – and this one charting the fortunes of a woman newly arrived on a Martian outpost is another riveting read. It’s rare that motherhood is examined with any depth in science fiction stories – yet the protagonist has left a baby behind and is grappling with feelings of guilt and inadequacy. There is a terrible twist that those who have read the previous two books are waiting for…

 

Child I by Steve Tasane
You won’t have read anything quite like this one. The cover alone tells you it is something different – and yet I plunged into it, thinking it was set on a near-future, post-apocalyptic Earth. I was devastated to learn it is set right now and based on the testimonies of children alive today…

 

 

 

All Systems Red – Book 1 of the Murderbot Diaries novella series by Martha Wells
Hard enough to write a well-paced novella – writing convincingly as a security robot assigned to keep scientific teams out of harm is far more difficult. Yet Wells triumphantly pulls it off. A marvellous read – I just wish I could afford to read the rest of the series…

 

 

There were other near misses it hurts to omit – Isha Crowe’s quirky Gwithyas: Door to the Void, L.E. Modesitt’s Outcasts of Order and Children of the Shaman by Jessica Rydill to name but three. What about you – what are your favourite reads of the year, so far?

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*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of INDIE Ebook The Green Man’s Heir by Juliet McKenna

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I’m a solid fan of this author’s work – see my review of The Hadrumal Crisis – and have always enjoyed the politically aware worldbuilding and sharp characterisation of her epic fantasy novels, all set in the same world. This one, however, is a complete break from her former body of work. This is, in effect, a very Brit take on the urban fantasy sub-genre, where the supernatural world interacts with the human version in trying to get to the bottom of a crime. But instead of grimy city streets, the setting is an English stately home and instead of the usual fare of vampires and werewolves, we have dryads, boggats and wyrms…

A hundred years ago, a man with a secret could travel a few hundred miles and give himself a new name and life story. No one would be any the wiser, as long as he didn’t give anyone a reason to start asking questions. These days, that’s not so easy, with everyone on social media, and CCTV on every street corner. So Daniel Mackmain keeps his head down and keeps himself to himself. But now a girl has been murdered and the Derbyshire police are taking a closer look at a loner who travels from place to place, picking up work as he goes. Worse, Dan realises the murder involves the hidden world he was born into. When no one else can see the truth, who will see justice done?

A modern fantasy rooted in the ancient myths and folklore of the British Isles.

And she has absolutely nailed it. This is a complete and utter joy. I loved the character of Daniel, part-dryad, who is desperate to meet up with others in his situation and when he finally tracks down someone who can help – it doesn’t end well… He is a sympathetic protagonist with a few chips on his shoulder – not surprising given his heritage and how it has caused him problems. He is tall, well-built and innately attracts women. While that might sound like dream attributes, in reality it has caused him a lot of problems with annoyed boyfriends and brought unwelcome attention from the police, when such incidents turn into brawls.

I love the setting of a country district – McKenna has got the social faultlines running through modern England spot on. While the beautiful setting, juxtaposed with the grim threat reaching back into history and now posing a possibility of creating havoc all over again, works beautifully. This one grabbed me and wouldn’t let me go until I put it down in the wee small hours, drained and slightly giddy.

The book hangover I’ve had since has been painful, because despite reading perfectly enjoyable, well written adventures, they haven’t been this world, with these characters. I want them back. I want more. And I’m hoping, fervently, that McKenna has plans to make this a series, because I’m already addicted.

Recommended for fans of urban fantasy and murder stories with a very cool paranormal twist.
10/10

Sunday Post – 1st April, 2018

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Thank you so much for all your kind good wishes for my sister’s speedy recovery. She is staying with us over the Easter week-end and feeling a lot better. We are hoping the weather will improve tomorrow so we can have a wander around Highdown Gardens and enjoy the fabulous display of spring flowers there.

And here we are – into April with the Spring term’s Creative Writing class behind us, apart from the Snow Day catchup session which will be held at the end of the Easter break… When did that happen? It seems that Christmas was only the day before yesterday! I have had a couple of rather lazy days with lie-ins before I have to get cracking on next term’s course and winding up the admin from last term, in addition to preparing for Tim’s upcoming exams. In the meantime, have a lovely Spring break.

This week I have read:

The Children of the Shaman – Book 1 of the Children of the Shaman series by Jessica Rydill

When their aunt is taken ill, thirteen-year old Annat and her brother are sent from their small coastal town to live with their unknown father. Like Annat, Yuda is a Shaman; a Wanderer with magical powers, able to enter other worlds. As Annat learns more about her powers, the children join their father on a remarkable train journey to the frozen north and find a land of mystery and intrigue, threatened by dark forces and beset by senseless murders that have halted construction of a new tunnel.
Despite the protagonist being a child, this isn’t a children’s read or even a YA book. There is plenty of adventure with a really interesting magic system and a nuanced, layered examination of family relationships. I shall be reviewing this one in due course.

 

Meet Me in the Strange by Leander Watts

Davi tries to help a new friend, Anna Z, escape a cruel and controlling brother, and the teens end up running away to follow the tour of their rock idol, the otherworldly Django Conn. The story is set in a weird and wonderful retro-futuristic city of glam-girls and glister-boys and a strange phenomenon that Anna Z calls the “Alien Drift.”
This YA offering is an extraordinary read – the worldbuilding and futuristic vibe reverberates through the punchy, inventive writing. Watt manages to evoke the stage when the youngsters define themselves through the music they hear – and then puts a paranormal twist on that…

 

The Green Man’s Heir by Juliet McKenna
A hundred years ago, a man with a secret could travel a few hundred miles and give himself a new name and life story. No one would be any the wiser, as long as he didn’t give anyone a reason to start asking questions. These days, that’s not so easy, with everyone on social media, and CCTV on every street corner. So Daniel Mackmain keeps his head down and keeps himself to himself.

But now a girl has been murdered and the Derbyshire police are taking a closer look at a loner who travels from place to place, picking up work as he goes. Worse, Dan realises the murder involves the hidden world he was born into. When no one else can see the truth, who will see justice done?

A modern fantasy rooted in the ancient myths and folklore of the British Isles.
This is a delight. An unusual urban fantasy which doesn’t feature werewolves or vampires – the supernatural creatures that people this engrossing read are dryads, boggats and shucks. I love how McKenna has woven the old folk tales that cris-cross this small island into her story. It was impossible to put down until I’d finished it.

 

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 25th March 2018

Teaser Tuesday featuring Children of the Shaman – Book 1 of the Children of the Shaman series by Jessica Rydill

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring The Ashes of London by Andrew Taylor

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Burn Bright – Book 5 of Alpha and Omega series by Patricia Briggs

Friday Face-off – You can’t sow an apple seed and expect an avocado tree… featuring The Seeds of Time by John Wyndham

Review of Queen of Chaos – Book 3 of the Sequoyah trilogy by Sabrina Chase

 

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

The First Ever Poet in the World: The Woman Writer, Enheduanna https://interestingliterature.com/2018/03/30/the-first-ever-poet-in-the-world-the-woman-writer-enheduanna/ This is a fascinating article which is worth reading.

The Cartography of the Solar System – Mars http://earthianhivemind.net/2018/03/30/cartography-solar-system-mars/ Steph once more has pulled together yet another jaw-dropping article showing the latest maps of our neighbouring planet…

#Author #Interviews: #writer Peadar Ó Guilín discusses setting & #pointofview in #writing. Thanks, @TheCallYA https://jeanleesworld.com/2018/03/29/author-interviews-writer-peadar-o-guilin-discusses-setting-pointofview-in-writing-thanks-thecallya/ This fascinating interview gives an insight into the decisions that a writer has to make – and what this particular master wordsmith takes into account when making those decisions.

Discussion Post: Who Are You? Finding Your Voice as a Blogger https://thebookishlibra.com/2018/03/29/discussion-post-who-are-you-finding-your-voice-as-a-blogger/ This is a really good piece of advice for bloggers starting out and wondering how to appear to their audience.

5 New Poetry Collections to Watch Out For https://librarystaffpicks.wordpress.com/2018/03/28/5-new-poetry-collections-to-watch-out-for-2/ Another helpful and interesting post from this great library-based blog.

Have a great week and thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site.