Tag Archives: The Frequency of Aliens

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Frequency of Aliens Book 2 of the Sorrow Falls series by Gene Doucette

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I really liked the cool cover and the blurb which sounds sharp and funny, if a tad chatty. I’ve only included part of it…

Becoming an overnight celebrity at age sixteen should have been a lot more fun. Yes, there were times when it was extremely cool, but when the newness of it all wore off, Annie Collins was left with a permanent security detail and the kind of constant scrutiny that makes the college experience especially awkward. Not helping matters: she’s the only kid in school with her own pet spaceship.

I found this one difficult to put down once I got used to the narrative. The story is pacey and due to the humour, feels quite different from, say, Fade Out, which I have also recently read and reviewed. This could so easily have been a grim tale of humanity facing a possible apocalyptic threat and while events are stacking up and there is a definite sense of unease, at no stage did the tone alter. I found it quite refreshing.

However, the catch with using any form of omniscient viewpoint – where the narrator is driving the story forward instead of the main characters – is the narrative can tip into being a mouthpiece for the author. So as I read on, I became aware that Doucette isn’t a fan of the military mindset, while feeling protectively admiring of isolated, rural settlements like Sorrow Falls.
Is this a major problem? It certainly wasn’t for hundreds of years, or for the likes of Charles Dickens and Jane Austen. However the current fashion is for our protagonists to tell the story from their viewpoints within the story, on the grounds that no one has an overarching, ultimate view of what is happening – and that is exactly what is going on throughout this book. If Doucette wasn’t so deft with his humour, I think I would have had more of a problem with the viewpoint but because his wry irreverence permeates the story, he manages to pull this one off.

Other than that, the writing is slick and effective, while he keeps the pace rolling forward. All the main characters were reasonably appealing, although I did find the bloodthirsty survivalists a little unnerving and wondered if Doucette is playing too much with stereotypes in his characterisations. However, the denouement and ending was well handled and I enjoyed reading this sufficiently that I will be looking out for the first book in the series, The Space Ship Next Door.

8/10

 

ANNDDD…

Just Books features an extract from Dying for Space as well as an article by yours truly about a very awkward conversation I had that led to my changing the setting of the Sunblinded trilogy just days before I released Running Out of Space.

Hywela Lyn features another excerpt from Dying for Space in which Elizabeth is on the wrong side of Sarge. Again…

Comfy Chair Books has posted another slice of Dying for Space in which Elizabeth is finding herself right out of her comfort zone at one of her father’s fancy banquets. In addition, there is an article about how I used food and dining as part of the worldbuilding in this book.

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Sunday Post – 17th December 2017

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

I’ve now broken up from Northbrook and got all my notes for next term’s course photocopied. I now only have the Scheme of Work and lesson plans to complete.

On Wednesday evening the writing group I belong to all went out for our Christmas jolly – to The Lamb in Angmering. The meal was absolutely delicious – vegetarian menus can be a bit hit and miss, but the mushroom tart tatin was utterly scrummy and of course, the company was great. We hadn’t managed to meet up throughout most of November so it was brilliant to catch up with everyone’s news

And on Thursday, I finally had the chance to be fully involved in the Launch Day for Dying for Space which was so much fun. Many, many thanks to those of you who sent messages of support, or retweeted about it. My lovely friend Mhairi came over, despite not feeling all that well and held my hand throughout the whole day – there is a solid reason why I dedicated Dying for Space to her… Though it was the second book I’ve released this year, the first time around I was in bed with flu.

On Friday, I woke up to the fact that Christmas is less than a fortnight away – eek! So got most of my cards written and sent and ordered a bunch of pressies online. Hopefully over the weekend I’ll be able to get the rest done.

This week I have read:

The Long Way Home – Book 1 of the Sequoyah series by Sabrina Chase
Webspace pilot Moire Cameron is one of the best–but even she can’t fly her way out of a catastrophic drive failure that triggers a time-dilation bubble. Left suddenly eighty years out of date, she is on the run in a world she no longer knows, caught in the middle of a human-alien war while agents of Toren hunt her for the information only she has–the location of the pristine world of Sequoyah.
Himself was on at me to read this one – and he was absolutely right. It’s excellent space opera – we start right in the middle of a space battle and the story just whips along with an intriguing, smart protagonist. Despite having a great deal on this week, this one proved to be impossible to put down until I’d finished it.

 

The Frequency of Aliens – Book 2 of the Sorrow Falls series by Gene Doucette
Becoming an overnight celebrity at age sixteen should have been a lot more fun. Yes, there were times when it was extremely cool, but when the newness of it all wore off, Annie Collins was left with a permanent security detail and the kind of constant scrutiny that makes the college experience especially awkward. Not helping matters: she’s the only kid in school with her own pet spaceship.
This is an enjoyable adventure around the spaceship that turned up in the first book in this series, which I haven’t yet read. Doucette manages to make the omniscient viewpoint work owing to his humorously wry take on the events that unfold around the hapless Annie. Review to follow after Christmas…

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 10th December, 2017

Review of The Medusa’s Daughter – Book 1 of The Mask of Medusa series by T.O. Munro

Teaser Tuesday featuring The Frequency of Aliens – Book 2 of the Sorrow Falls series by Gene Doucette

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring The Shadow Weaver by MarcyKate Connolly

Launch of Dying for Space – IT’S HERE  …AND Pippa Jay featuring an excerpt from Dying for Space

Friday Face-off – Hubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble…featuring Strong Poison – Book 6 of the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries by Dorothy L. Sayers
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Chuckles at Chuckles Book Cave promoting Running Out of Space and Dying for Space
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Mello & June, It’s a Book Thang featuring an excerpt from Dying for Space

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Fade Out by Patrick Tilley
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Bibliophile Ramblings featuring an excerpt from Dying for Space

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Christmas During the American Civil War #Christmas #history @RichardBuxton65 http://maryanneyarde.blogspot.co.uk/2017/12/christmas-during-american-civil-war.html?spref=tw This excellent article is penned by ex-student Richard Buxton, author of Whirligig which I reviewed here. Both are worth reading…

We Look Forward to Your Next Submission http://liminalstoriesmag.com/blog/2016/8/7/we-look-forward-to-your-next-submission The marvellous Steph Bianchini – @SPBianchini – brought this one to my attention – and it’s well worth passing on.

Is This Cigar-Shaped Asteroid Watching Us? http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2017/12/scientists_are_watching_oumuamua_an_asteroid_they_think_could_be_an_alien.html?wpsrc=sh_all_dt_tw_top And just when you thought truth couldn’t get any more stranger than fiction…

10 Things Only People Who Read Ebooks Understand https://mccullum001.wordpress.com/2017/12/13/10-things-only-people-who-read-ebooks-understand/ These ten hilarious cartoons certainly cheered me up.

Give Your Answers in the Blog Comments, Please… https://blogging807.wordpress.com/2017/12/11/give-your-answers-in-the-blog-comments-please/ You’ve been kidnapped. You can call on one character from one book to come and rescue you. Who do you call?

Thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site and may you have a great week.

Teaser Tuesday – 12th December, 2017

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Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This is my choice of the day:

The Frequency of Aliens – Book 2 of the Sorrow Falls series by Gene Doucette

58% The Groton naval base had the necessary security while the naval vessels mostly did not – the military still didn’t entirely trust wifi – so until Ed reached Groton, he was unable to retrieve what ended up being an absurdly massive number of messages.
The messages arrived in multiple ways: emails, voicemails, and text messages. They didn’t necessarily add up to anything individually, but taken as a whole it was clear a lot had gone wrong in the few weeks he’d been out of the country.

BLURB: Becoming an overnight celebrity at age sixteen should have been a lot more fun. Yes, there were times when it was extremely cool, but when the newness of it all wore off, Annie Collins was left with a permanent security detail and the kind of constant scrutiny that makes the college experience especially awkward.

Not helping matters: she’s the only kid in school with her own pet spaceship.

She would love it if things found some kind of normal, but as long as she has control of the most lethal—and only—interstellar vehicle in existence, that isn’t going to happen. Worse, things appear to be going in the other direction. Instead of everyone getting used to the idea of the ship, the complaints are getting louder. Public opinion is turning, and the demands that Annie turn over the ship are becoming more frequent. It doesn’t help that everyone seems to think Annie is giving them nightmares.

Nightmares aren’t the only weird things going on lately. A government telescope in California has been abandoned, and nobody seems to know why.

The man called on to investigate—Edgar Somerville—has become the go-to guy whenever there’s something odd going on, which has been pretty common lately. So far, nothing has panned out: no aliens or zombies or anything else that might be deemed legitimately peculiar… but now may be different, and not just because Ed can’t find an easy explanation. This isn’t the only telescope where people have gone missing, and the clues left behind lead back to Annie.

This week I’m reading another alien encounter quite different from last week’s offering. In amongst the paranoia and fear, there is also a humorous edge which I’m enjoying. However, I’m beginning to think there is something nasty OUT THERE and it has humanity in its sights…