Tag Archives: space colony

Review of KINDLE Ebook Frontier – an Epsilon Sector novella by Janet Edwards

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This is a standalone novella that nonetheless nests within the excellent Earthgirl series – see my review of Earthgirl here.

frontierAmalie’s the last unmarried girl in Jain’s Ford settlement. Life on a frontier farming planet in the twenty-eighth century has a few complications. The imported Earth animals and plants don’t always interact well with the local ecology, and there’s a shortage of doctors and teachers. The biggest problem though is the fact there are always more male than female colonists arriving from other worlds. Single men outnumber single women by ten to one, and girls are expected to marry at seventeen. Amalie turned seventeen six months ago, and she’s had nineteen perfectly respectable offers of marriage. Everyone is pressuring her to choose a husband, or possibly two of them. When Amalie’s given an unexpected chance of a totally different future, she’s tempted to take it, but then she gets her twentieth offer of marriage and it’s one she can’t possibly refuse.

Edwards writes with a chirpy energy that has her heroine pinging off the page with a likeable can-do attitude I find very endearing. Amalie is the eldest of eleven children and is used to making do so her tough practicality shines throughout this story. Because the character is both engaging and believable and the worldbuilding is filtered entirely through her, I found the newly established colony plausible and engrossing. Edwards perfectly depicts a small community with the town gossip, the eccentrics, the misfit with too much money and the rough-edged type of boisterous behaviour in the bar where Amalie works that would probably come to the attention of the law enforcement authorities in a more established settlement.

I’m a fan of a story that steadily builds on a series of small, everyday details that finally collide in a dramatic event – and Edwards is very skilled at handling this dynamic. Alongside her struggle to find the right husband – and avoid the plethora of wrong ones – Amalie is also trying to ensure her father’s experimental crop is successful. The sudden drama that impacts on the situation works well in raising the stakes for everyone in the small community and providing a reminder that life in such a place is always going to be risky.

Edwards perfectly judges the pacing and narrative arc for this novella and brings the story to a thoroughly satisfying conclusion. Those of you who found the Earthgirl series a delight and would like to once more experience this mostly upbeat, enjoyable world should track down this novella – it won’t disappoint.
9/10

Review of KINDLE Ebook Planetfall by Emma Newman

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I treated myself to this one, as I’d heard lots of good things about it and I had already read and enjoyed Emma Newman’s Between Two Thorns.

planetfallRenata Ghali believed in Lee Suh-Mi’s vision of a world far beyond Earth, calling to humanity. A planet promising to reveal the truth about our place in the cosmos, untainted by overpopulation, pollution, and war. Ren believed in that vision enough to give up everything to follow Suh-Mi into the unknown. More than twenty-two years have passed since Ren and the rest of the faithful braved the starry abyss and established a colony at the base of an enigmatic alien structure where Suh-Mi has since resided, alone. All that time, Ren has worked hard as the colony’s 3-D printer engineer, creating the tools necessary for human survival in an alien environment, and harbouring a devastating secret. Ren continues to perpetuate the lie forming the foundation of the colony for the good of her fellow colonists, despite the personal cost.

Then a stranger appears, far too young to have been part of the first planetfall, a man who bears a remarkable resemblance to Suh-Mi. The truth Ren has concealed since planetfall can no longer be hidden. And its revelation might tear the colony apart…

Ren is a wonderful protagonist – smart, wary and so achingly vulnerable while maintaining a tough exterior that precludes any sort of self pity. When such a great character bounces off the page, I realise how rarely this depth and poignancy is achieved. I love the world and the fact that from the very first page, we learn there is some terrible secret surrounding planetfall which has compromised the colony and hangs over Ren like a swinging sword.

The pin-sharp writing prismed through Ren’s pov gives us a vivid view of the accompanying cast of characters, particularly Mack, who has engineered the cover-up surrounding the circumstances that took place all those years ago. And there’s the young stranger who staggers into their small settlement, who has clearly been living off the land in ways the far more pampered colonists could never do. Who changes everything…

But in order for this story really to work, not only do we need to be heavily invested in the internal politics governing the colony, we also need to fully believe in the alien structure that was the point of their journey to this planet in the first place. Is it strange and disturbing enough? Oh yes. The forays that Ren take inside the structure are visceral and disorientating, without any real answers. I love the nature in which the traumatic events impact upon Ren’s behaviour – awesomely original and yet, heartbreakingly logical and so very human. As I was luxuriating in this eerie, beautifully crafted book, there was a small niggling worry at the back of my head in case the ending would be a disappointment.

I needn’t have worried. The ending is so very right that I closed up my Kindle with tears in my eyes, which doesn’t happen all that often. This one comes with a strong recommendation if you enjoy science fiction on any level – it’s an outstanding read.
10/10