Tag Archives: planets

Friday Faceoff – It’s a fixer-upper of a planet, but we could make it work… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffplanetcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with PLANETS. I’ve selected Children of Time – Book 1 of the Children of Time duology by Adrian Tchaikovsky – see my review. I have linked this post to #Sci Fi Month 2020.

PanMacmillan, June 2015

This is the default cover and was produced by PanMacmillan in June 2015. I really love this cover – it would have caught my eye, even if I wasn’t a huge fan of the author, as I’m always a sucker for spacescapes. And this one has it all… an interesting ship, something clearly going on between the ship and the planet, with lovely lighting effects. The font is well balanced and genre appropriate, although I do think the author name could pack a bit more punch. The only grizzle I have, is that line of blurb plopped in the middle of the design, which I think distracts and detracts from the overall image.

Italian edition, February 2018

Published in February 2018, by Italian publisher Fannucci, this is another cool spacescape. However, the title font is rather overpowering – to the extent that it’s difficult to see the cover behind it. I think it could be both smaller and less chunky and will be clearly visible, while also allowing us to see more of that planet and spaceship.

Polish edition, July 2017

This Polish edition, published in July 2017 by Rebis actually takes us down to the planet surface. I’m not quite sure about this… the way the book is written and structured, that depiction on the cover is a huge spoiler. That said – I’d love to think the artist is giving their view of Portia, who absolutely rocks😊. It isn’t my favourite, but it is an interesting departure, as all the other covers choose to depict the ship.

Latvian edition, December 2018

Published by Prometejs in December 2018, this Latvian edition is another one showing us the spaceship and the planet. It’s a rather beautiful rendition. The colouring of the planet surface is lovely. I really like the way the blue glow surrounding the planet is picked up by the approaching spaceship. This gives the cover a pleasing symmetry, as the title font appears in the centre, between the planet and ship. This is a strong contender – I so nearly went for this one…

French edition, April 2018

This French edition, published in April 2018 by Denoël, is my favourite by a whisker. I like the fact we are looking down on the both the planet, and the ship orbiting it. Like the default cover, this one manages to inject a sense of visual drama by the use of light. I also like the fact there are actual stars in the spacescape – it’s a relatively small detail, but it makes all the difference. But for me, the decider is that visual clue about what is actually happening on the planet – so clever and subtle. However, if you’ve read the book and know what I’m talking about – it’s immediately apparent. While I like this one best, which one do you prefer?







Friday Faceoff – Any planet is ‘Earth’ to those who live on it…

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This week the theme is planets, so I’ve chosen The Empress of Mars by the wonderfully talented Kage Baker.

 

This is the cover produced by Tor in May 2009. I like this one – the depiction of the half-terraformed planet is vividly portrayed without any undue clutter or blurb, which makes this one very effective.

 

This Italian edition, produced in October 2007 by Delos Books is more static with the red desert landscape featuring, rather than showing any of the feisty characters that ping off the page. I don’t feel this cover does the book justice, but neither is it an egregious travesty either.

 

Published in December 2008 by Subterranean Press, this cover is less about the Mars environment and more about the characters. It tends to have a sense of fantasy about it, which isn’t quite right. That said, it is eye-catching and effective and anything that encourages a reader to pick one of Baker’s books off the shelf is to be encouraged.

 

This cover, produced by in 2003 by Night Shade Books, once again features a Martian landscape. This depiction certainly looks very like a lot of the images we have seen of Mars, especially the pink-tinged sky and rather foreshortened horizon. I particularly like the font on this one. As for my favourite? This week I simply cannot decide. What about you – do you have a preference?