Tag Archives: James Sallis

Review of KINDLE Ebook #Willnot by James Sallis #buddyread #bookreview #bookblog #bookblogger

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My book blogging friend Emma Littlefield and I decided to teamread a book recommended by the other – and as James Sallis is a favourite author of Emma’s, we started off by reading Willnot.

Did you pick this book up thinking it was going to be a murder mystery?
No. I wasn’t sure quite what to expect. Having read quite a few Sallis books now, one thing I like about his stories is that they never quite end up where I think they might. A number of his trilogies have detectives or private investigators as central characters and they do investigate murders but it’s never the be all and end all of everything. Sometimes, they don’t even get solved. It’s more about the journey’s the characters take and that’s what I like.

Is this book a classic example of James Sallis’s writing?
Yes, I would say so. I always end up describing it to people as quite sparse as there isn’t a word wasted. Some people I’ve recommend him to say that nothing happens in the books but I disagree, I think a lot happens to the characters it’s just it tends to be small things that build up to big changes.

When you finished the book were you elated and blown away, or just the tiniest bit disappointed?
I was very happy. The last Sallis book I read (The Killer is Dying) is actually the first one I haven’t enjoyed and I was a bit worried I had burnt out on the author. I was also a bit worried that he’d lost his writing way. This had all the elements I love in his work and, while it wasn’t the best of the books I’ve read, it was by no means the worst. Content is maybe the best way to describe it.

How does this rate alongside other books by this author?
I would say it’s probably right in the middle (maybe high middle). My favourite books are Drive and Driven and his Turner Trilogy because I just feel in love with his characters in these books.

As you can see from her answers, Emma is a thoughtful, intelligent reader whose opinions I value – you can pop over to her blog here to read her questions to me along with her review of Willnot. And here is my review…

In the woods outside the town of Willnot, the remains of several people have suddenly been discovered, unnerving the community and unsettling Hale, the town’s all-purpose general practitioner, surgeon, and town conscience. At the same time, Bobby Lowndes–his military records disappeared, being followed by the FBI–mysteriously reappears in his hometown, at Hale’s door. Over the ensuing months, the daily dramas Hale faces as he tends to his town and to his partner, Richard, collide with the inexplicable vagaries of life in Willnot.

I love the writing style. Sallis builds up a vivid picture of daily life in this small, US community with a wealth of everyday occurrences, delivering them with pace and a vividness that pulled me into the book. Hale, his protagonist, is a thoroughly nice chap who is one of those lynchpins that all communities need. His duties as the town’s doctor, surgeon and coroner put him right in the centre of all the major events in Willnot in a manner that appears completely unforced and realistic.

Sallis’s smooth, accomplished prose has a lovely rhythm that evokes Hale’s character and the setting without ever putting a foot wrong – there is so much about this book that is an absolute delight… However, if you’re sensing a but – you’d be right. My quibble isn’t with the writing, or the characterisation, or even the plot progression and storyline – all that works beautifully. What wrongfooted me was after reading the blurb, I was expecting a murder mystery – a whodunit where this busy, responsible man takes it upon himself to solve the puzzle of those bodies discovered right at the beginning of the story and clearly rock the small town, where daily life is generally quieter and more peaceful.

But that wasn’t where the focus or impact of this story lay – and while appreciating all the strengths that I’ve already enumerated about this book, I kept turning the pages, waiting for the denouement and drama surrounding this mystery. Or any mystery… While there is some drama and an unexpected shooting, the overall plot didn’t seem to be about that at all, which is absolutely fine – apart for my expectations.

Would I read another James Sallis novel? Oh yes – he’s evidently a fine writer and I really enjoyed being introduced to him – thank you, Emma!
8/10

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Sunday Post – 18th March, 2018

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

And here we are – with snow on the ground and an icy wind blowing. On Friday the temperature was in the mid-50s with bright sunshine and there were butterflies and bumblebees in the garden. I’m aware some of you are used to such temperature swings. We aren’t.

This week’s roundup is going to be short as I am in the throes of the final act of my rewrite of Miranda’s Tempest – so this morning that’s where I’m going. Back to their enchanted island and Miranda’s fury as she discovers the identity of the Black Magician who ensorcelled her into loving Ferdinand and deserting the true love of her life…

This week I have read:

Removed – Book 1 of the Nogiku series by S.J. Pajonas
It’s easy for Sanaa to ignore the first signs of trouble. After all, she’s living her dream with a job and life she loves. But when she’s reassigned as a data analyst for a mysterious, well-connected man, she starts to piece together the alarming reality. Corrupt clans vie for control of the city, desperate for a ticket off the dying planet.

I really enjoyed this slow-burn sci fi thriller and am delighted that I’ve got the next book in the series as I will definitely be reading it soon.

 

A Pair of Docks – Book 1 of The Derivatives of Displacement series by Jennifer Ellis
Fourteen-year-old Abbey Sinclair likes to spend her afternoons in the physics lab learning about momentum and gravitational pull. But her practical scientific mind is put to the test when her older brother, Simon, discovers a mysterious path of stones that allows them, along with Abbey’s twin, Caleb, to travel back and forth between their world and what appears to be…the future.

Unfortunately, they’re not the only ones who know about the stones, and they soon realize their lives are in danger from a man known only as Mantis. Abbey, Caleb, and Simon must follow a twisting trail of clues that will lead them from their autistic neighbor, Mark, to a strange professor who claims to know the rules of the stones, and to multiple futures—some of whose inhabitants don’t want to stay put.

Apparently, this is a children’s book – but don’t be put off by that. The protagonist might be a youngster, but this reads far more like YA without any romance. The characters are nuanced, the plotting sophisticated and the world delightfully complex. I’ve just discovered a cracking new series – yippee!

 

Willnot by James Sallis
In the woods outside the town of Willnot, the remains of several people have suddenly been discovered, unnerving the community and unsettling Hale, the town’s all-purpose general practitioner, surgeon, and town conscience. At the same time, Bobby Lowndes–his military records disappeared, being followed by the FBI–mysteriously reappears in his hometown, at Hale’s door.

I’ve just finished reading this one – a team read with my blogging friend, Emma at One Reader’s Thoughts. We were supposed to be discussing it as we went, but I’ve burned through it, so I’m not saying anymore until I’ve spoken to her about it…

 

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 11th March 2018

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Reclaiming Shilo Snow – Book 2 of The Evaporation of Sofi Snow series by Mary Weber

Teaser Tuesday featuring A Pair of Docks – Book 1 of The Derivatives of Displacement series by Jennifer Ellis

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Escaping Firgo by Jason Whittle

Review of Blunt Force Magic – Book 1 of the Monsters and Men series by Lawrence Davis

Friday Face-off – Like a puppet on a string… featuring The Puppet Masters by Robert Heinlein

Review of Why We Sleep: Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams by Matthew P. Walker

 

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

The Why #amwriting https://didioviatt.wordpress.com/2018/03/15/the-why-amwriting/ Right now I need a reminder as to WHY I’m putting myself through this bleeping misery… And this sums it up quite neatly.

Are We Ready for Tiangong-1? http://earthianhivemind.net/2018/03/17/ready-tiangong-1/ Some of us might need to consider putting on hard hats before leaving the house…

So Bad It’s Good: The Best Bad Poets in English Literature https://interestingliterature.com/2018/03/16/so-bad-its-good-the-best-bad-poets-in-english-literature/ Probably not the book you’d want to find yourself featuring in…

Thursday Doors https://jeanreinhardt.wordpress.com/2018/03/15/thursday-doors-96/ It’s been a while since I’ve featured this site, but I regularly visit and fell in love with this GORGEOUS door…

Learning to Build my Writing “Cathedral” Again https://saraletourneauwriter.com/2018/03/14/building-writing-cathedral/ Yep. More about the writing – and this article explains a very personal journey for one talented writer I know…

Have a great week and thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site.