Tag Archives: Genevieve Cogman

Friday Faceoff – Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffstylisedcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring STYLISED covers. I’ve selected The Invisible Library – Book 1 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman – see my review.

Pan, December 2014

This offering was produced by Pan in December 2014. This is the cover of the edition that I read, which probably has influenced my decision – because it is one of my two favourites this week. I love the lovely teal background and the nifty little details highlighted in gold, which gives a good sense of the period feel of this portal fantasy adventure. And while I don’t love the strapline, at least it has been treated as part of the overall design, rather than plopped onto the middle of the cover as an afterthought, as so often happens.

Ace, June 2016

Published in June 2016, by Ace, this cover has clearly taken its inspiration from the original, with similar styling. The main differences are the background colour – that beautiful rich blue makes the gold detailing sing out. However, I find those details create just a bit less impact and therefore don’t draw my eye as successfully as the top cover. But I suspect this week, it is going to be down to personal taste, because there is nothing essentially wrong with this design, which is still beautiful and classy.

Czech edition, October 2017

This Czech edition, published by Omega in October 2017, is my other favourite this week. I love that rich crimson background and the heavy gilded border and very elaborate detailing on the title font gives this cover a sumptuous, luxurious tone that harks back to a time when books were rare and valuable items. And what I particularly like about that dynamic, is that these are the types of books that frequently feature within The Invisible Library. It’s a dynamic which I think all these covers are reaching for – but this is the one that most successfully achieves it.

Romanian edition, March 2019


This Romanian edition, published in March 2019 by Editura Nemira, is another lovely offering. This time, the styling includes more colour and less gold and I particularly like that beautifully elaborate, steampunk-ish key featured in the middle of the design. However, I’m not so keen on those leaves popping up on the border design of the cover – that kind of flora simply doesn’t appear in this book. But I can’t deny that those little drops of red do draw the eye.

Turkish edition, March 2016

This Turkish edition, published by Timaş Yayınları in March 2016, is another lovely, stylised design. I like the mathematical feel of some of the detailing in the corners, as well as featuring the gothic detailing in the architecture of the Houses of Parliament. This one is so nearly a contender for my favourite of the week – but unfortunately, the lighter shading fades into near invisibility when in thumbnail, which was a dealbreaker, given the purpose of book covers is to draw the attention of a prospective reader. Which is your favourite?


November 2020 Roundup – Reading, Writing and Blogging… #BrainfluffNovember2020Roundup

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November was defined chiefly by the second lockdown in the UK, and although it wasn’t as strict as the first one, it did bring my social life to an abrupt halt again. So other than seeing the grandchildren when necessary (we are part of our daughter’s support cluster as she is a single-parent family) and shopping when Himself wasn’t able to fulfil the brief, I hunkered down at home, busy writing and reading. Other than teaching Tim, which I did resume after a long, serious discussion weighing the pros and cons with his mother…

Reading
I read twelve books in November, which isn’t a particularly large number – but that’s okay. More importantly, once again it’s been a great reading month qualitywise – particularly for space opera and space adventures in general. Because this was #Sci Fi Month 2020, which was once again organised by Imyril at There’s Always Room for One More and Lisa at Dear Geek Place and was a huge success.

My Outstanding Book of the Month was Nophek Gloss by Essa Hansen and my Outstanding Audiobook of the Month was Wintersmith – Book 3 of the Tiffany Aching series by Terry Pratchett.

My reads during November were:

Dead Lies Dreaming – a Laundry Files novel by Charles Stross. See my review.

AUDIOBOOK Wintersmith – Book 35 of the Discworld novels & Book 3 of the Tiffany Aching series by Terry Pratchett – Outstanding Audiobook of the month. Review to follow.

Architects of Memory – Book 1 of The Memory War series by Karen Osborne. Review to follow.

The Thief on the Winged Horse by Kate Mascarenhas. See my review.

Angel Six Echo by Robert Appleton. See my review.

AUDIOBOOK The Son of Neptune – Book 2 of The Heroes of Olympus series by Rick Riordan. Review to follow

Nophek Gloss – Book 1 of The Graven by Essa Hansen. Outstanding book of the month. See my review.

The Sculpted Ship by K.M. O’Brien. See my review.

Aftermath – Book 5 of the Sirantha Jax series by Ann Aguirre. Review to follow.

Fallen – Book 10 of the Alex Verus series by Benedict Jacka. See my review.

Lifelode by Jo Walton. Review to follow.

The Dark Archive – Book 7 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman. See my review.

Writing and Editing
Halfway through the month, I finally completed the manuscript for Picky Eaters 2 – which initially was going to be a novella – only to discover that it was a monster of over 117,000 words! I will be writing about all this in more detail in a separate post later in the month – but basically that was just nonsense. I’m not in the mood right now to read anything of that length – so why would I expect my readers to do so, either? Particularly as the whole point of this series is to provide some escapist fun. So I rolled up my sleeves and dived in. It took nearly a week of hard work and rewriting – but I now have a version of Picky Eaters 2, renamed Flame and Blame, that I’m happy with at just under 73,000 words. The great news is that I also have just under 50,000 words of the next novel in the trilogy, which will be called Trouble With Dwarves.

Overall, I wrote just over 61,300 words in November, with just under 20,000 on the blog, and just under 40,000 on my writing projects. This brings my yearly wordcount to date to just under 477,000 words. I’m very happy with that – the increased in the speed of my writing since I returned from Bexhill has been a gamechanger and should mean that next year will be far more productive.

Blogging
Blogging revolved around Sci Fi Month, which was a joy. I added far too many books to my towering TBR and was able to swing by and chat to some other blogs I don’t regularly visit. Though as I battled with teasing apart my manuscript during the second half of the month, I’m afraid my visiting once more suffered. Sorry about that! In the meantime, I hope everyone is able to stay safe. Take care.x






*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Dark Archive – Book 7 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman – #BrainfluffNETGALLEYbookreview #TheDarkArchivebookreview

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I was absolutely delighted to be approved for this next adventure in this entertaining, original series, as I’ve grown really fond of Irene. See my reviews of The Invisible Library, The Masked City, The Secret Chapter, and my mini-review of The Lost Plot. But when a series continues over a period of time, the ongoing challenge is to make each story fresh and exciting.

BLURB: Librarian spy Irene thought her to-do list would be her undoing. She’s on missions for both the Library and a dear friend – the detective Vale. And she’s also training her new Fae apprentice, who’s more interested in the stacks than sleuthing. But now someone is trying to kidnap her and kill her friends. As Irene, Kai and Vale try to track down the would-be assassin, they uncover a plot. It’s even more insidious than usual and could threaten Irene’s headquarters, Vale’s home and the Library itself. Someone is creating links between high-chaos worlds and Vale’s world. Someone who wants Irene well out of the way – and will do anything to make this happen. When the allies’ investigation takes a wrong turn, they find themselves trapped deep underground. And while they wander among long-abandoned archives, Irene’s old enemies are closing in.

REVIEW: I really appreciated diving back into this clever portal fantasy, featuring a magical library with a cool, well trained protagonist who performs well when in danger. Given her magical ability is words of command that can change and affect the world around her, it makes Irene very powerful. But Cogman is also good at finding antagonists that are equally formidable, so that she genuinely has to struggle to prevail.

Much about this story worked really well. Having a new, Fae student who tends to be impetuous and rather rash, means that Irene has her work cut out to keep her safe. Especially as the young woman has the survival instincts of a bunny in the headlights, particularly at the beginning of the book. I enjoyed watching Catherine’s character develop and gain confidence throughout the story. I also liked seeing Kai’s relationship with his elder brother – it’s always diverting to get a bit of sibling rivalry going to upset a usually smooth team dynamic.

And the major plot twist was nicely effective – I was pleased to see the re-emergence of an old enemy who I loved to hate – and though I had an inkling about the reveal, it was gripping to see just how much it undermined Irene and her sense of self belief. This is definitely going to influence her actions in the next book, I think.

What was less successful, was the depiction of the ongoing relationship between Irene and Kai. In the past, I have very much felt the connection between them, but although we were told about it – I didn’t feel that strong emotional vibe this time around. While I’m aware this isn’t principally a romance, if the element is there and apparently they still care deeply for each other, I would have liked to have been more convinced by it. My other concern is that Epilogue… I very sincerely hope that isn’t a major misstep – only time will tell!

Having said that, you’ll see by the score that these issues weren’t major impediments to a thoroughly enjoyable read. Recommended for fans of enjoyable portal fantasy adventures and those featuring magical libraries – though whatever you do, start with The Invisible Library, or you simply won’t get the best from this engrossing series. While I obtained an arc of The Dark Archive from Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
8/10

Sunday Post – 29th November, 2020 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

The week started overcast and dull, but the last couple of days has been brighter and sunnier – and doesn’t that make a difference? Himself has been on annual leave and we planned to clean, tidy and declutter. The great news is that we have made a bit of progress! The kitchen and the lounge are now looking a LOT better. Yay! My eldest grandson is now out of quarantine and returns to school this week to his Drama exam, so I am very relieved. And in this week’s links below, I have included Tim’s mix of the song ‘Let It Go’ using 103 clips from films and TV programmes, which he has also edited himself – I think he’s done a magnificent job. Do nip along and check it out…

I have now successfully disentangled my monster manuscript and have the complete first draft of Picky Eaters 2, which is now called Flame & Blame. I also have two-thirds of the next book written, entitled Trouble With Dwarves and I’ve been working on completing the plan for that one and the next book in the series, which will be entitled, A Conspiracy of Dragons. So enough to keep me happily occupied for the rest of the year and into 2021…

I have also been loving Sci Fi Month and I’m very sorry that it’s coming to an end – but I’ve picked up so many recommendations for exciting new sci fi reads. A huge thank you to thank you so much to Imyril at There’s Always Room for One More and Lisa at Dear Geek Place for all their hard work and if you are looking for more science fiction goodness in your life – here’s the link to the Master Schedule for a quick browse.

The photos this week come from a rather soggy walk along the beach with Himself, when we talked through the plans for Trouble With Dwarves. Notice the shingle and seaweed up across the sea front after a recent storm…


Last week I read:

Fallen – Book 10 of the Alex Verus series by Benedict Jacka
Once Alex Verus was a diviner trying to live quietly under the radar. Now he’s a member of the Light Council who’s found success, friends…and love. But it’s come with a price–the Council is investigating him, and if they find out the truth, he’ll lose everything.

Meanwhile, Alex’s old master, Richard Drakh, is waging a war against the Council, and he’s preparing a move that will bring Alex and the life mage, Anne, under his control. Caught between Richard and the Council, Alex’s time is running out. To protect those he cares for, Alex will have to become something different. Something darker…
I was delighted to dive back into this excellent Brit-based urban fantasy adventure, which is one of the smartest I’ve come across. Needless to say, Verus is in a bucketful of trouble and things are steadily getting worse… I’ve an arc for the next book, which I’m looking forward to, after an intriguing ending. Review to follow…

Lifelode by Jo Walton
Lifelode is the Mythopoeic Award Winning novel from Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Award winning author Jo Walton. It was published in hardcover in 2009 by NESFA Press and is now available for the first time as an ebook.

At its heart, Lifelode is the story of a comfortable manor house family. The four adults of the household are happily polygamous, each fulfilling their ‘lifelode’ or life’s purpose: Ferrand is the lord of the manor, his sweetmate Taveth runs the household, his wife Chayra makes ceramics, and Taveth’s husband Ranal works the farm. Their children are a joyful bunch, running around in the sunshine days of the harvest and wondering what their own lifelodes will be.

Their lives changed with the arrival of two visitors to Applekirk: Jankin the scholar and Hanethe, Ferrand’s great grandmother and the former lord of the manor, who has been living for many generations in the East, a place where the gods walk and yeya (magic) is so powerful that those who wield it are not quite human.
Walton is one of my all-time favourite authors, so I was thrilled to discover this gem that I hadn’t yet read. As ever, it’s a masterpiece… Review to follow.

The Dark Archive – Book 7 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Gogman
Irene is teaching her new assistant the fundamentals of a Librarian’s job, and finding that training a young Fae is more difficult than she expected. But when they both narrowly avoid getting killed in an assassination attempt, she decides that learning by doing is the only option they have left – especially when the assassins keep coming for them, and for Irene’s other friends as well…

In order to protect themselves, Irene and her friends must do what they do best: search for information to defeat the overwhelming threat they face and identify their unseen enemy. To do that, Irene will have to delve deeper into her own history than she ever has before, face an ancient foe, and uncover secrets that will change her life and the course of the Library forever.
It was a real treat to get hold of the arc of this latest offering in this engaging portal fantasy. Irene is one of my favourite protagonists – cool, clever and generally in command of the situation. I loved the major plot twist, but I’m not too sure about that Epilogue… I’m hoping it isn’t a massive misstep! Review to follow.


My posts last week:

Review of The Sculpted Ship by K.M. O’Brien

Castellan the Black and His Wise Draconic Sayings

Friday Face-off featuring Embers of War – Book 1 of the Embers of War series by Gareth L. Powell

Great Science Fiction Series I’ve Discovered in 2020

Review of A Memory Called Empire – Book 1 of the Teixcalaan series by Arkady Martine

Can’t-Wait Wednesday featuring A Desolation Called Peace – Book 2 of the Teixcalaan series by Arkady Martine

Review of Stranger Still – Book 3 of the Strange series by Marilyn Messik

Covet the Covers 12 – featuring the sci fi covers of Elizabeth Moon

Two mini-reviews: Embers of War by Gareth L. Powell and Ribbonworld by Richard Dee

Sunday Post – 22nd November 2020


Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Crotty’s Lake I https://inesemjphotography.com/2020/11/26/crottys-lake-i/ Inese’s fabulous photos capture the wonderful landscape and wildlife – such a treat at this time…

Frozen’s ‘Let It Go’ Sung by 103 Movies and TV Shows https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZC4et1M8T_I&feature=youtu.be And here is Tim’s rendition of ‘Let It Go’ – one of his recent projects… Though I teach him – I want to make it clear that I had nothing to do with this achievement. This is his own talent and hard work shining through!

TOP TEN TUESDAY: Sci Fi Month edition: My Top Ten Sci-Fi tv series – #SciFiMonth https://spaceandsorcery.wordpress.com/2020/11/24/top-ten-tuesday-scifi-month-edition-mytop-ten-sci-fi-tv-series-scifimonth/ Someone else joining in the Sci Fi Month jollity – reading this list brought back some very happy memories – as well as a reminder to get stuck into The Expanse…

The Tale of Two (or more) Rockets https://earthianhivemind.net/2020/11/22/the-tale-of-two-or-more-rockets/ I always enjoy Steph’s articles about what is happening in the world of science…

Top Ten Tuesday: Reading in a time of COVID… https://lynns-books.com/2020/11/24/top-ten-tuesday-reading-in-a-time-of-covid/ Lynn provides a list of the books that provided her with comfort during this difficult year – have you changed your reading habits during 2020?

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you and yours have a peaceful, healthy week. Take care.

Three AUDIBLE Fantasy Mini-Reviews – How to Betray a Dragon’s Hero; The Lost Plot; Uprooted #Brainfluffbookreviews #3Audiblemini-reviews

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Here are a series of mini-reviews of books that all fall under the fantasy genre – but couldn’t be more different if they tried… They are also enjoyable, escapist reads which is a great way to round off the wonderful month of Wyrd and Wonder. Thank you to imyril @ There’s Always Room for One More, Lisa @ Dear Geek Place and Jorie Loves a Story for their hard work in making this event such a huge success.

AUDIOBOOK How To Betray a Dragon’s Hero – Book 11 of the How To Train Your Dragon series
BLURB:High up in the Treacherous mists of the Murderous Mountains, Hiccup and the Company of the Dragonmark are in hiding. The witch’s Vampire Spydragons are guarding the shores of Tomorrow — but Hiccup is determined to become King of the Wilderwest. Can Hiccup dodge the dragons and steal back the King’s Things from Alvin before the Doomsday of Yule? And is there a traitor in Hiccup’s camp who, in the end, will betray them all?

Again, it is something of a shock to realise how much darker this penultimate book is when comparing it to the first two or three in the series. Hiccup and his companions are in a very hard place, and the world they knew has been flamed flat and turned into ruins. Cowell doesn’t pull her punches when depicting the war-torn ravaged remains of the Viking tribes as they struggle to prevail against the might of the Dragon Furious and the Dragon Rebellion.

For all that, there are still shafts of humour, chiefly courtesy of Toothless and the other small dragon that Hiccup has acquired called Hogfly and David Tennent’s fabulous narration ensured both the tension and comedy were brilliantly evoked. As ever, the pacing is perfect and it was difficult to tear myself away as the adventure went on gathering momentum. This book ends on a mighty cliffhanger and whatever you do, don’t pick it up if you haven’t read at least the previous three or four books in the series as it simply won’t make sense. A gripping, enthralling read for Viking fans of all ages.
9/10



AUDIOBOOK The Lost Plot – Book 4 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
BLURB: In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find themselves caught in the middle of a dragon political contest. It seems a young Librarian has become tangled in this conflict, and if they can’t extricate him, there could be serious repercussions for the mysterious Library. And, as the balance of power across mighty factions hangs in the balance, this could even trigger war.

Irene and Kai are locked in a race against time (and dragons) to procure a rare book. They’ll face gangsters, blackmail, and the Library’s own Internal Affairs department. And if it doesn’t end well, it could have dire consequences on Irene’s job. And, incidentally, on her life…

I was really entertained by this slice of Prohibition New York, when Irene and Kai find themselves trying to track down a rogue Librarian and a lost book in a world where dragons are playing powergames. The premise is clever, the characters enjoyable – I really love the fact that Irene is a cool, self-contained character who always performs at her best when in a really tight spot. And she spends a great deal of time in those really tight spots…

This was huge fun with gangster molls, hardboiled cops and lethally ambitious dragons trying to foil our plucky duo in their vital mission. The one slightly annoying factor for me was the very dry, low-key narration by Susan Duerdan which didn’t line up all that well with set-piece action scenes. I got AWFULLY fed up with that dropping cadence… However, it wasn’t a dealbreaker as Cogman’s vivid scene-setting, clever plotting and deft characterisation managed to rise above the rather monotonous delivery.
8/10



AUDIOBOOK Uprooted by Naomi Novik

BLURB:“Our Dragon doesn’t eat the girls he takes, no matter what stories they tell outside our valley. We hear them sometimes, from travelers passing through. They talk as though we were doing human sacrifice, and he were a real dragon. Of course that’s not true: he may be a wizard and immortal, but he’s still a man, and our fathers would band together and kill him if he wanted to eat one of us every ten years. He protects us against the Wood, and we’re grateful, but not that grateful.”

Agnieszka loves her valley home, her quiet village, the forests and the bright shining river. But the corrupted Wood stands on the border, full of malevolent power, and its shadow lies over her life.

Her people rely on the cold, driven wizard known only as the Dragon to keep its powers at bay. But he demands a terrible price for his help: one young woman handed over to serve him for ten years, a fate almost as terrible as falling to the Wood. But Agnieszka fears the wrong things. For when the Dragon comes, it is not Kasia he will choose.

I’ve gone back to read my original review – and realised that I gobbled this one up in two greedy gulps and now, listening to it again some four years later, I’m rather horrified at just how much I’d forgotten. It generally stands up very well to hearing the story unfold and I fell in love with Agnieszka all over again. But I was a bit startled when a very graphic sex scene suddenly appeared right in the middle of all the magical mayhem and seemed very out of place. I’ve discovered it’s a bit more of a hassle to fast-forward through bits you don’t want to hear, than it is when reading them…

Other than that, I loved the narrative drive, the story structure and the ending – though why anyone thought this was a suitable YA read frankly astounds me.
9/10

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Secret Chapter – Book 6 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman #Brainfluffbookreview #TheSecretChapterbookreview

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I was delighted to be approved to read an arc of this latest slice in Irene’s adventures – see my review of the first book, The Invisible Library. The catch was that I needed to read the previous two books, The Lost Plot and The Mortal Word in something of a hurry so that I got to it in the right order. It turned out to be a blessing – everyday life last week was rather fraught with family illness and these quirky, well-written adventures where just what I needed as an escape. Would The Secret Chapter prove to be as entertaining?

BLURB: A Librarian’s work is never done, and once Irene has a quick rest after their latest adventure, she is summoned to the Library. The world where she grew up is in danger of veering deep into chaos, and she needs to obtain a particular book to stop this from happening. No copies of the book are available in the Library, so her only choice is to contact a mysterious Fae information broker and trader of rare objects: Mr. Nemo. Irene and Kai make their way to Mr. Nemo’s remote Caribbean island and are invited to dinner, which includes unlikely company. Mr. Nemo has an offer for everyone there: he wants them to steal a specific painting from a specific world. He swears that he will give each of them an item from his collection if they bring him the painting within the week.

This latest slice of Irene’s adventures is essentially a heist story. Irene and Kai find themselves having to work alongside a team of rather dodgy characters – something she is far too used to doing. However, this crew are every bit as dangerous as the task they have been set by the shadowy Mr Nemo. I love the way Cogman plays with stereotypes – imagine a James Bond villain, complete with the Caribbean island setting and hungry sharks lurking in a hidden tank beneath their feet.

I am not going into any details as it would be a real shame to spoil this entertaining, twisty story packed with incidents and surprises. Cogman is very adept at creating an action-packed adventure without losing the overall impetus of the story, which is a harder trick to pull off than she makes it look. Once again, we learn more about the closed world of dragon society and just how dangerous they can be when crossed. I love the way in which Cogman reveals extra details about the world in which she has set the Invisible Library with each successive book. It isn’t a new trick, as all good series do the same thing – but she is particularly good at delivering new facts that suddenly change the reader’s perception of what is going on. I love it when that happens.

I ended up reading the last three books in this series back to back, which is something I generally don’t do. And it is a testament to Cogman’s writing skill and mastery of plot development that by the end of The Secret Chapter I was still thoroughly entertained and sorry when the book came to an end.

This classy series just goes on delivering and is highly recommended for fans of good-quality portal fantasies. The ebook arc copy of The Secret Chapter was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest opinion of the book.
9/10

Sunday Post – 17th November, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

It’s been a horrible week. Himself sustained a shoulder injury, and has been in a great deal of pain throughout the week, despite a visit to the doctor and two physio sessions. Looking back, I realised that he has increasingly been unable to fully move his neck for a while but because he wasn’t suffering any pain, I didn’t do anything more about it. I wish I had. He is signed off work until Wednesday but barring a miracle I can’t see him returning. I hate seeing him suffer so much despite heat packs, cold compresses, Voltarol rubs, arnica oil massages, exercises, painkillers and using the trusty TENS machine.

To add to the general fun, that wretched headache I’d suffered last Friday hung around until Wednesday, as welcome as a bad smell, leaving me still exhausted and drained. I’ve missed writing group, the monthly West Sussex Writers’ Club meeting, and had to cancel a one-day Poetry Day I was supposed to be running yesterday.

Last week I read:

The Mortal Word – Book 5 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
A corrupt countess. A spy in danger. And an assassin at large.
Peace talks are always tricky . . . especially when a key diplomat gets stabbed. This murder rudely interrupts a top-secret summit between the warring dragons and Fae, so Librarian-spy Irene is summoned to investigate. In a version of 1890s Paris, Irene and her detective friend Vale must track down the killer – before either the peace negotiations or the city go up in flames. Accusations fly thick and fast. Irene soon finds herself in the seedy depths of the Parisian underworld on the trail of a notoriously warlike Fae, the Blood Countess. However, the evidence against the Countess is circumstantial. Could the assassin – or assassins – be closer than anyone suspects?
Cogman manages to successfully evoke the claustrophobic sense of closing timescales as problems multiply when deaths, kidnapping attempts and deadly attacks on the hotel holding the talks all stack up. I love the way we learn a little bit more about both the Fae and the dragon worlds with each book.

 

The Secret Chapter – Book 6 of The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
As Irene tries to manage a fraught Fae–dragon truce and her overbearing parents, she’s given a hot new mission. The world where she grew up is in danger and only one book can save it. This is held by Mr Nemo, secretive Fae villain and antique dealer, so Irene and Kai travel to his Caribbean retreat to strike a deal. But in return for the book, they must steal a painting from twenty-first-century Vienna. They’ll join a team of dragons, Fae gamblers and thieves, so their greatest challenge may be one another. And some will kill to protect this painting, which hides an extraordinary secret from a past age.
Yet another full-on adventure in this excellent paranormal series. I love the varying settings this portal fantasy provides, with a sympathetic, clever protagonist and wonderful pacing. Review to follow.

My posts last week:

Review of Sweep of the Blade – Book 4 of The Innkeeper Chronicles by Ilona Andrews

Friday Faceoff featuring Robots and the Empire – Book 4 of the Robot series by Isaac Asimov

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Body Tourists series by Jane Rogers

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Starship Alchemon by Christopher Hinz

Teaser Tuesday featuring Mantivore Prey – Book 2 of The Arcadian Chronicles by S.J. Higbee

Review of Bright Shards – Book 2 of the Vardeshi Saga by Meg Pechenick

Sunday Post 10th November 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

What happens when a bot writes your blog posts https://thisislitblog.com/2019/11/16/what-happens-when-a-bot-writes-your-blog-posts/ Shruti wondered whether she was replaceable as a blogger – the result is hilarious…

Linguistic Interventions (et tu Bayer?) https://writerunboxed.com/2019/11/15/this-is-not-why-we-scribe-bayer/ How much does the mangling of our language irritate you? Or don’t you care? Porter certainly does…

November 15th, “I Love to Write Day” https://literacyletters.wordpress.com/2019/11/15/november-15th-i-love-to-write-day/ Rae throws out the question – why do YOU love to write? Are you up for answering?

Non-Fiction November: Become an Expert… on Gender! https://rathertoofondofbooks.com/2019/11/11/non-fiction-november-become-the-expert-on-gender/ Hayley has decided to read a series of books on this complicated subject. What a cool way to investigate a tricky issue!

Ways to cope with a character death (and other unfortunate scenes) https://bookwyrmingthoughts.com/ways-to-cope-with-a-character-death-and-other-unfortunate-scenes/ Have you ever been traumatised by a character death? Sophia suggests ways of coping…

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week.

Sunday Post – 10th November, 2019 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Last week was another busy one – I taught Tim on Monday and Wednesday and spent Tuesday catching up with a number of reviews, emails and admin that stacked up during Mhairi’s stay. I was delighted to get a text from my son, Robbie, who is now back from LA, asking if he could come down the next day. I hadn’t seen him since last December, so it was a real treat. On Thursday, I was working with a former student on her poetry collection, which was lovely as I haven’t seen her in a while. I miss all my former students… Once I returned home, Rob and I – in between catching up – worked on an audition tape, which was quite intense but a lot of fun. However, everything caught up with me on Friday, because when I woke up, I felt absolutely wiped out with a sick headache, which was a real shame as I was supposed to be driving over to Brighton to visit my daughter, watch Eliza having her swimming lesson and take part in a birthday tea with Oscar, who was celebrating his tenth birthday – when did that happen? I’m sure it was only yesterday, he was bumbling around learning to walk, as Eliza is doing just now… Sadly, I had to cancel because I felt too dire to drive over to Brighton. Fortunately Himself was here to drive Rob to the station to catch his train back to Cambridge. I was really fed up that I’d been unable to make the most of his visit AND miss out on Oscar’s birthday tea.

At the beginning of the week, I got back the notes from my main beta reader regarding Mantivore Prey, so what writing time I’ve had has been spent working through those and listening to the manuscript while following the text on the screen – my final major edit. I picked up a sprinkling of niggling errors and one anomaly, and now feel it’s definitely ready to release at the end of the month. I will be making ARC copies available through Booksprout tomorrow. However, I haven’t written a word towards the current WIP, Mantivore Warrior, which has been rather frustrating – I really need that writing clone…

Last week I read:

New Star Rising – Book 1 of The Indigo Reports series by Cameron Cooper
Bellona Cardenas Scordina de Deluca, daughter of the primary Cardenas family, went missing ten years ago. Reynard Cardenas, Bellona’s father and head of the family, receives anonymous, unsubstantiated news that she has been found. He sends the most disposable person in the family to investigate—Sang, the family android.

Sang’s investigation trips off chain reactions which shift the generations-old luke-warm war between Erium and Karassia into a galaxy-wide conflagration which will engulf the known worlds, including the neutral, fiercely independent free states…unless a hero can be found who will fight to hold the line against the two colossal forces.
I thoroughly enjoyed the twisty plot to this space opera series and will be reviewing it in due course.

 

Pirate Bound – prequel to the Telepathic Space Pirates series by Carysa Locke
A desperate gamble…
Sanah would do anything to protect her little sister, even if it means taking refuge with ruthless pirates. But the psychically Talented pirates terrorizing Commonwealth space are not quite the monsters she has been led to believe. When Sanah’s empathic gift shows her the truth behind the stories, she is no longer certain who the villains are in her world.

A race on the verge of extinction…
Dem’s only goal is to protect his people, especially since a deadly bio-weapon decimated their population. Only a handful of women survived, and every day is a fight to rebuild. With Sanah’s empathy and her sister’s rare ability to heal, they could be the salvation Dem and his people have been looking for.

A dangerous secret that could destroy everything…
But how can Sanah trust Dem with her life? Especially when he’d kill her if he knew the truth.
This was pure escapist fun, with lots of mayhem and tension around some powerful, telepathic personalities and a dash of romance thrown in for good measure.

 

The Lost Plot – AUDIOBOOK – #4 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman
In a 1930s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force, fedoras, flapper dresses and tommy guns are in fashion, and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find themselves caught in the middle of a dragon vs dragon contest. It seems a young librarian has become tangled in this conflict, and if they can’t extricate him there could be serious political repercussions for the mysterious Library. And, as the balance of power across mighty factions hangs in the balance, this could even trigger war.
It’s been a delight to catch up with this entertaining series – I’m so glad that I also have the next book in the series waiting for me… Review to follow

My posts last week:

KU Sci Fi/Fantasy Event

Friday Faceoff featuring Cibola Burn – Book 4 of The Expanse series by James S.A. Corey

Review of First Flyght – Book 1 in The Flyght series by S.J. Pagonas

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of The Missing Diamond Murder – Book 3 of the Black and Dod series by Diane Janes

Teaser Tuesday featuring Pirate Bound – prequel to the Telepathic Space Pirates series by Carysa Locke

Review of The Switch by Justina Robson

Sunday Post 3rd November 2019

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last few weeks, in no particular order:

COYER Winter 2019 Sign-up Post https://unconventionalbookworms.com/coyer-winter-2019-sign-up-post/ This isn’t something I take part in – but a lot of bloggers I know do, so I thought I’d spread the word about this year’s event…

Bloggers Wanted https://caffeinatedbookreviewer.com/2019/11/bloggers-wanted.html For those who want to take their book blogging to another level, becoming a Caffeinated influencer is a really good option – the blog always professional with a high quality of reviews and plenty of activity…

When You Lose Someone You Love by Joanne Fink https://carlalovestoread.wordpress.com/2019/11/05/when-you-lose-someone-you-love-by-joanne-fink/ I don’t normally include reviews of books in this round-up, but this one felt important, for obvious reasons…

Pete Seeger, Eric Bibb, Johnny Rivers & Harry Belafonte: An Archangel, A Sacred River, A Spiritual & The Folk Process! https://theimmortaljukebox.com/2019/11/04/pete-seeger-eric-bibb-johnny-rivers-harry-belafonte-an-archangel-a-sacred-river-a-spiritual-the-folk-process/ Thom is revisiting some of his most popular posts from his first year of blogging – if you enjoy popular music and haven’t yet had the pleasure of visiting The Immortal Jukebox, it is a joy…

Read for the Record https://jenniefitzkee.com/2019/11/07/read-for-the-record/ It’s important for a whole host of reasons to encourage new generations to love books, too – so inspirational teachers like Jennie are to be treasured…

Thank you for visiting, reading, liking and/or commenting on my blog – I hope you have a wonderful week.

Review of The Masked City – Book 2 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

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I recently completed The Invisible Library and loved it – see my review here. So I tracked down this sequel at our local library, full of anticipation as most of my blogging buddies said it was even better than the first book.

Librarian-spy Irene is working undercover in an alternative London when her assistant Kai goes missing. She discovers he’s been kidnapped by the fae faction and the repercussions could be fatal. Not just for Kai, but for whole worlds.

Irene, the cool, rather detached protagonist who is starting to work her way up the Library hierarchy as her work is starting to come to the attention of those who matter – is no longer cool or detached. Her young, impulsive and very powerful assistant, Kai, has been kidnapped and she is tasked with the job of retrieving him. Just to add to the gravity of the situation, Kai is a dragon prince. And the immensely powerful dragons will take it as a declaration of war if they can prove it is the Fae who are at the bottom of the kidnapping.

I love the setup here. The dragon-controlled worlds tend to be very organised and logical, whereas those run by the Fae are infested with chaos, so by their very nature, dragons and Fae loathe and distrust each other. The Library and its staff try to keep neutral between the two factions – that’s the theory, anyway. But they, too, cannot cope with worlds permeated wholly by Fae-inspired chaos, which can twist and poison their purpose.

So Irene sets off in pursuit of Kai as part of Lord Silver’s entourage, a Fae lord, who is opposed to the faction who have kidnapped the young dragon prince. The world she ends up in approximates to a Victorian Venice, complete with St Mark’s Square and a Campanile. This story is brimming with incident and tension throughout – it would make a marvellous film – as Irene has to battle her way through a hostile landscape to try and discover where Kai is being kept. The slight steampunk flourishes that appear in the first book are given a fuller rein here, particularly during a marvellous chase in magical train.

It was almost painful to put this book down as the story pulled me in and held me captivated until the end, which is also very well handled. For fans of well-told alternate world stories with strong magical systems and lots of tension.
10/10

Sunday Post – 30th July 2017

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Book Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Now we are into the summer holidays, I am in major grannying mode as Oscar has spent the week with us. Last Monday morning I attended a meeting about Tim, so Oscar spent the morning with his aunty and we wandered down to the beach afterwards. In the afternoon, so we broke out the little plastic kite we found in the back of a cupboard and took it back down to the beach once John got back from work and went kite flying. Oscar loved it, so we were back there on Tuesday morning and phoned up to get my sister to join us – she’s now a firm favourite with Oscar. On Wednesday it poured with rain – but that was okay because Oscar, my sister and me went to watch Despicable Me III at Chichester. We all thoroughly enjoyed it – Oscar ticked us both off for laughing too loudly…

On Thursday, J’s parents came down for the day, so we all went out for lunch at the Harbour Lights café, where there are lovely views of the River Arun and during the meal Oscar was entertained watching children having yachting lessons on the river. In the afternoon, they took J’s new stunt kite out for a spin – but it broke, so the three boys, J, his father and Oscar spent the rest of the afternoon fixing it, which seemed to be almost as much fun as flying it, while his mother and I had a good old natter. On Friday, Oscar and I made his vegan pizza and a batch of banana bread in readiness for our trip to the Lego BrickLive exhibition yesterday at the ExCel exhibition centre. I was a bit worried about the journey – it took four changes of train/underground to get us there, so J came along, too. He carried all the food and took charge of the bags while Oscar and I roamed around the huge area, which helped enormously. Oscar loved it and we both had great fun – though he decided the brick pits full of Lego pieces were far too knobbly to sit in. Our favourite area was the Kingdom where we helped to build a huge castle and he also loved the Fan zone where there some fantastic models on display. Today we’re taking it easy…

This week I have read:

The Burning Page – Book 3 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman

Librarian spy Irene has professional standards to maintain. Standards that absolutely do not include making hasty, unplanned escapes through a burning besieged building. But when the gateway back to your headquarters dramatically malfunctions, one must improvise. And after fleeing a version of Revolutionary France astride a dragon (also known as her assistant, Kai), Irene soon discovers she’s not the only one affected. Gates back to the Library are malfunctioning across a multitude of worlds, creating general havoc. She and Kai are tasked with a mission to St Petersburg’s Winter Palace, to retrieve a book which will help restore order.
Once again, Cogman whisks us up into her amazing worlds alongside Irene and Kai to face another full-on adventure where they get to save the world. Again. I loved it and am now very much looking forward to reading the next slice of the adventure – highly recommended.

The Cold – Book 5 of the Star Wars: Adventures in Wild Space series by Scott Cavan
Milo and Lina Graf have picked up the trail of their kidnapped parents–but an ambush in the depths of Wild Space leaves them stranded on a desolate ice planet. With an old enemy out for revenge, can they survive THE COLD?
Once again, I was impressed by just how well told this ongoing adventure is – and how genuinely exciting and scary the antagonists are. This time, they have to deal with the bitter cold and the prospect of a watery death. Review to follow.

 

 

Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory
The Telemachus family is known for performing inexplicable feats on talk shows and late-night television. Teddy, a master conman, heads up a clan who possess gifts he only fakes: there’s Maureen, who can astral project; Irene, the human lie detector; Frankie, gifted with telekinesis; and Buddy, the clairvoyant. But when, one night, the magic fails to materialize, the family withdraws to Chicago where they live in shame for years. Until: As they find themselves facing a troika of threats (CIA, mafia, unrelenting skeptic), Matty, grandson of the family patriarch, discovers a bit of the old Telemachus magic in himself. Now, they must put past obstacles behind them and unite like never before.
A number of my fellow book bloggers were enthusiastic about this offering – so I was delighted when I saw it was still available on Netgalley. It took me a while to get into this one, but I was completely won over by the end, which was particularly impressive. Review to follow.

Crash Land on Kurai – Book 1 of the Hikoboshi series by S.J. Pajonas
Crash Land on Kurai is the first book in the Hikoboshi series, an action adventure, space opera series that explores the worlds settled by the Japanese who fled Earth a century ago. Culture, history, technology, and swords clash in a fast-paced future society on the brink of war.

Yumi Minamoto has the shortest fuse on the ship. She’s just whipped a bully and been confined to quarters, but she’s not staying there. A disgraced journalist trying to clear her name, her job is to document the mission to the Hikoboshi system, and she’s determined to get it right, despite all the trouble she causes. But when unknown vessels fire on their ship, and Yumi’s life pod crash lands on a dying moon, she’s separated from her family and friends, and her mission falls to pieces. Now she must navigate the unfamiliar and deadly terrain, deal with a society she doesn’t understand, and try to stay alive until rescue comes… if it ever does.
I read Lola’s fabulous review of this book and immediately zipped across to get hold of it. I really enjoyed reading this one – the way the culture has morphed under the pressures of a hostile environment and warring factions is both realistic and fascinating. Review to follow.

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 23rd July 2017

Review of Chocolate Chocolate Moons by Jackie Kingon

Teaser Tuesday featuring Spoonbenders by Daryl Gregory

Review of Sweep in Peace – Book 2 of The Innkeeper Chronicles by Ilona Andrews

Review of Hag-Seed: The Tempest Retold by Margaret Atwood

Friday Face-off – The first cut is the deepest… featuring Beguilement – Book 1 of The Sharing Knife series by Lois McMaster Bujold

Series I Have Continued or Completed in 2017 – Part 1

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

10 of the Best Poems about Stars https://interestingliterature.com/2017/07/28/10-of-the-best-poems-about-stars/ A lovely selection here…

Adventures in Science Fiction Cover Art: Otherworldly Textures and the Patina of Decay (the SF art of Philippe Jean) https://sciencefictionruminations.com/2017/07/27/adventures-in-science-fiction-cover-art-otherworldly-textures-and-the-patina-of-decay-the-sf-art-of-philippe-jean/ Joachim always has something interesting to offer on this fascinating and information site – but I particularly enjoyed this article

Science Fiction, Horror & More – Why Speculative Fiction Matters http://authorkristenlamb.com/2017/07/science-fiction-horror-more-why-speculative-fiction-matters/ As a confirmed fan of speculative fiction, I was interested to see what Kristen Lamb had to say on the subject, as she’s always worth reading…

5 New Playscripts to Look Out For https://librarystaffpicks.wordpress.com/2017/07/26/5-new-playscripts-to-watch-out-for/ Yet another informative article by this award-winning library site.

Bladdered or Shitfaced? The gentle art of word choice and the bogglement of page-proofing https://jaceybedford.wordpress.com/2017/07/25/bladdered-or-shitfaced-the-gentle-art-of-word-choice-and-the-bogglement-of-page-proofing/ Talented author Jacey Bedford sets out the trials of editing in this entertaining article.

Thank you very much for taking the time and trouble to visit, like and comment on my site and may you have a great week.