Tag Archives: gardens

Tuesday Treasures – 14 #Brainfluffbookblog #LightintheLockdown

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Himself and I had a break a couple of weeks ago to celebrate our 25th wedding anniversary, and visited Bateman’s, the home of Rudyard Kipling. Though the house is closed at present, we spent a lovely afternoon wandering around the gardens, which is where I took this week’s photos.

Tuesday Treasures – 6 #Brainfluffbookblog #LightintheLockdown

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I’ve been uploading photos of my garden on my Sunday Posts, which have been getting a lot of positive comments, so I have decided to feature the pics in their full size, so you can see some of the detail. This week, I am featuring some of the yellow and gold-coloured foliage in my garden, because it is mostly plants with striking foliage that attract me and while last week I featured the dark, or bronze coloured foliage, there needs to be a splashes of brightness to sing out and cheer me up during the long dreary days of winter. Here they are…

Golden boxI grew this bush from a small cutting I plucked while on a walk…
The flowers on this pretty little fuschia look even more lovely against the gold leaves
Variagated oleaster, which is as tough as old boots and screens us from the road
A conifer with golden-edged leaves – it glows in the winter…
This pretty little pittosporum has golden-veined leaves
Last week I named one of my heuchera Rhubarb and Custard – and I was wrong – this is the real one!
Spotted laurel. I love this plant…
But if I had to name my favourite plant in the whole garden – it’s this one. My Goldfinger choisya blazes throughout the winter, reminding me of sunny days…
This dear little thuja is called Rheingold – isn’t it cute?

Tuesday Treasures – 5 #Brainfluffbookblog #LightintheLockdown

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I’ve been uploading photos of my garden on my Sunday Posts, which have been getting a lot of positive comments, so I have decided to feature the pics in their full size, so you can see some of the detail.

I nicked out to take these photos between rain showers, so the light levels are much more reduced than recent pictures I’ve taken. This week, I am featuring some of the dark-coloured foliage in my garden, because although I’ve recently been featuring the flowers – it is mostly plants with striking foliage that attract me and I particularly like dark, or bronze coloured foliage and flowers.

Black-leaved elder – you can see the berries starting to form

This variagated trandescantia is one of my favourites…

This purple-leaved robinia or smoke tree is really tough – we had to chop it down when putting in the fence, but here it is, sprouting back up again!

This black-leaved grass is really a form of lily, and is as tough as old boots…

This heuchera is called Silver Scrolls
This heuchera is (I think) called Rhubarb and Custard…
This black leaved pittosporum looks fabulous in winter when all the leaves darken

This little berberis glows even during the darkest winter days

To my shame – I’ve forgotten the name of this heuchera – though that doesn’t stop it being a firm favourite…

This heuchera is called Midnight Rose

Tuesday Treasures – 2 #Brainfluffbookblog #LightintheLockdown

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I’ve been uploading photos of my garden on my Sunday Posts, which have been getting a lot of positive comments, so I decided to make them a regular feature, but this time at full size so you can better appreciate the plants. It was my birthday on Friday and though it’s hard to imagine on this blustery, rain-soaked Tuesday morning, it was hot with bright sunshine and ideal for the planned picnic at Borde Hill Garden with my daughter and three grandchildren. We had to book in advance, which meant it was easy to observe social distancing and the gardens were fabulous. So here are some of the pics I took…










*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of KINDLE Ebook Return to the Secret Garden by Holly Webb

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This children’s book is a direct sequel to Frances Hodgeson Burnett’s famous novel The Secret Garden which was a favourite of mine, after my grandmother read it to me way back in 1963. So would I enjoy revisiting this world by another author over a generation later?

returntothesecretgardenIt’s 1939, and the occupants of the Craven Home for Orphaned Children have been evacuated to Misselthwaite Hall, a fancy manor in the English countryside, to escape the Blitz. Emmie would hardly call the orphanage “home,” but her heart breaks knowing that leaving Craven means leaving her beloved cat, Lucy. Away from everything she’s ever known and trapped in imposing Misselthwaite, Emmie finds herself more miserable than ever. But soon she starts discovering the secrets of the house-a boy who cries in the night, a diary written by a girl named Mary, and a garden. A very secret garden…

Emmie is certainly a worthy successor to poor, spoilt Mary Lennox. She has edges that have nothing to do with being unduly pampered – quite the opposite in fact. While the adults around her are quite tough with her, I did like the fact that the people running the orphanage aren’t depicted as evilly intent on crushing the spirit of their charges. While their form of punishment may jar with modern norms, at the time it wasn’t uncommon for children to be regularly slapped or beaten with a slipper or strap for transgressions. I could see the adults were all feeling frayed and coping with the practicalities of moving twenty orphans to the other end of the country must have been a daunting task, given that half the staff were off ‘doing their bit’.

Any grizzles? Well I do have a problem with the cover, which is rather cute and girly and gives the impression that this is lighthearted, fluffy read when its nothing of the sort.

Given the book’s relationship with the original story, several characters feature in this sequel that had major parts in the first book. I very much enjoyed seeing Webb’s take on how they went on to develop after original The Secret Garden ended. However, this book is far more than merely an additional riff of that story. Webb deals with all sorts of gnarly issues in this well written, nuanced novel that covers an interesting time in our history. What happened to hundreds and thousands of pets all over the country in towns, for instance – which directly impacted on the adults’ attitude towards one small stray cat. There is also a sudden death, which winded me. I kept expecting the character, who had played a crucial role in Emmie’s happiness, to pop up at the end of the book, declaring that his reported death had been a muddle and it was all going to end happily ever after. It didn’t. I admire Webb enormously for not sugar-coating the bleak fact that during that time lots of men were killed – and kind, caring responsible fathers, sons and brothers were swallowed up by the mincing machine that was WWII never to return. Through Emmie’s shocked eyes, we get a ringside seat into how those left behind coped with such a grievous loss and put their lives back together again.

This is a well-written, though provoking story on dealing with loss – a major theme in Return to The Secret Garden – and Webb does an excellent job of showing the consequences of war in an unsentimental, entertaining way.
9/10