Tag Archives: Feet of Clay

#Friday Faceoff – Just put one foot in front of the other – and keep going… #Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. It is currently being nurtured by Lynn at Lynn’s Book Blog. This week the theme is a cover featuring footsteps, so I’ve selected Feet of Clay – Book 19 of the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett.

 

This edition was produced by Corgi in May 1997. I love it. I love the brightness, the detail and the quirky oddness that encapsulates what Pratchett’s writing is all about. I’m also conscious that in the world where books are often sold in ebook form these days, it isn’t a cover that does well as a thumbnail. The main reason why this isn’t my favourite is that ugly blue box containing the title and author plonked right in the middle of that glorious artwork.

 

Published in February 2004 by Hartorch, this cover lacks the charm and bustling humour of the previous offering. However, I do like the footprints running up the side and the quirky title font – I just wish that blue wasn’t so drab or the head with glowing eyes didn’t look as if this is horror – Pratchett’s work can be thought provoking but isn’t remotely creepy.

 

This edition, published by Gollancz in June 2014 is another one that looks as if this book is in the horror genre. The dark figure with glowing red eyes and white swirls looks really threatening. I do like how they have handled the title and Pratchett’s name, however.

 

Produced by Turtleback Books in February 2004, this edition certainly gives a sense that this is a humorous novel. I love the bubbles, along with the footprints featured in the centre of the cover. The font is also quirky and offbeat, giving a clue about the genre. This is a better effort than the previous, gloomy offering, I feel.

 

This French cover – which hasn’t any other details on Goodreads – is my favourite. The characters draw on those marvellous Josh Kirby and Paul Kidby covers with some lovely detailed artwork that still looks effective when shrunk down to thumbnail size. The title and author fonts are also well handled. Which is your favourite?

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