Tag Archives: desert setting

Review of KINDLE Ebook Blood Upon the Sand – Book 2 of The Song of the Shattered Sands by Bradley Beaulieu

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During the dark winter months, I’ve found myself drawn to desert-based fantasy or Sand and Sorcery as I like to call it… I thoroughly enjoyed the first book in this epic series, would this one sustain the tension?

Çeda, now a Blade Maiden in service to the kings of Sharakhai, trains as one of their elite warriors, gleaning secrets even as they send her on covert missions to further their rule. She knows the dark history of the asirim—that hundreds of years ago they were enslaved to the kings against their will—but when she bonds with them as a Maiden, chaining them to her, she feels their pain as if her own. They hunger for release, they demand it – will Çeda manage to keep their dark drives under control?

My advice before you plunge into this book is to first track down Twelve Kings. In common with most epic fantasy, there is a wide-ranging cast of characters and a handful of plotpoints spiralling away from Çeda’s main story arc that holds it altogether. So inevitably you’ll be slightly floundering at the start of this one as it hits the ground running – and the premise and world are of a quality that it would be real shame to miss out on the nuances and backstory.

I’m not the greatest fan of epic fantasy, as inevitably when trying to keep track of all those interconnecting plotlines and weaving the political machinations that abound in these books, the depth of characterisation tends to suffer. Not so with Çeda. Beaulieu manages to continue to make her motivations and unfolding backstory the nexus of this complicated, vividly drawn world – which is a major achievement and doubtless has garnered the clutch of positive reviews I have read by reviewers who I know like character-driven plots. And the fact that he has succeeded in keeping her so sharply defined within such a very broad canvas elevates this one. I don’t always like her, or what she gets up to, but I am mesmerised by her and her fractured, lonely childhood. And I’d love for her find a measure peace and happiness – though I don’t somehow see that happening…

As for the world – it is riveting. The gods in this environment are every bit as savagely unyielding as the arid landscape and have exacted a terrible price from the kings to keep them ruling over this city-state – Sharakhai. This book is peopled by vengeful ghosts, demons and monsters in human form intent on keeping hold of what they have at all costs… Meanwhile neighbouring kingdoms are circling, feeding support to the freedom fighters plotting to bring down the twelve kings. There is no second book slump here as the pace accelerates, rocketing forward to the climactic battle where everyone has something to lose – and gain. I’ll definitely be looking out for the next book in this excellent fantasy series and if you like your action dune-pocked and dripping with sweat, then this one is for you.

While I obtained the arc of Blood Upon the Sand from the publisher via NetGalley, this has in no way influenced my unbiased review.
9/10

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Teaser Tuesday – 28th February, 2017

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tuesday

Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This is my choice of the day:

Twelve Kings – Book 1 of The Song of the Shattered Sands by Bradley Beaulieu
3% She didn’t tell Emre she’d seen the Jackel King in the Knot. He’d only worry, and there was little enough to tell in any case. And yet, despite her silence, he said to her one day, “You’re acting strangely.”twelvekings

Which was rich, coming from Emre.

BLURB: Sharakhai, the great city of the desert, center of commerce and culture, has been ruled from time immemorial by twelve kings—cruel, ruthless, powerful, and immortal. With their army of Silver Spears, their elite company of Blade Maidens, and their holy defenders, the terrifying asirim, the Kings uphold their positions as undisputed, invincible lords of the desert. There is no hope of freedom for any under their rule. Or so it seems, until Çeda, a brave young woman from the west end slums, defies the Kings’ laws by going outside on the holy night of Beht Zha’ir. What she learns that night sets her on a path that winds through both the terrible truths of the Kings’ mysterious history and the hidden riddles of her own heritage. Together, these secrets could finally break the iron grip of the Kings’ power…if the nigh-omnipotent Kings don’t find her first.

I’ve got a real taste for desert-based fantasy at the moment. While suffering withdrawal symptoms for The Rebel Sands series, I thought I’d tuck into this promising offering. And I haven’t been disappointed. It is quite different, but still engrossing and well written with a wonderfully vivid world. An ideal read on a dreary winter day!

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of KINDLE Ebook Traitor to the Throne – Book 2 of the Rebel of the Sands series by Alwyn Hamilton

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I fell in love with reckless, danger-loving Amani in Rebel of the Sands when I seemed to be the last person on the planet to have read this highly praised book, so would I enjoy the sequel?

traitortothethroneMere months ago, gunslinger Amani al’Hiza fled her dead-end hometown on the back of a mythical horse with the mysterious foreigner Jin, seeking only her own freedom. Now she’s fighting to liberate the entire desert nation of Miraji from a bloodthirsty sultan who slew his own father to capture the throne. Forget everything you thought you knew about Miraji, about the rebellion, about djinni and Jin and the Blue-Eyed Bandit. In Traitor to the Throne, the only certainty is that everything will change.

Firstly, a huge thank you to NetGalley. I requested this one more in hope than expectation and was thrilled when I was granted permission to read it – only to discover that I wasn’t able to download it. The techs at NetGalley were on it, unfailingly helpful and persistent until they sorted out the problem and Traitor to the Throne duly turned up on my trusty Kindle.

And I was even more grateful once I tucked into this gem, for as much as I relished the first book, I loved this one even more. Hamilton has a very nifty trick for those who haven’t had the pleasure of reading the first book – she gets Amani to recite a tale about her exploits to date at the start of the story. While I would highly recommend those of you who may not have read Rebel of the Sands to do so, if you pick up Traitor to the Throne first, I can guarantee you won’t be adrift. And the abbreviated blurb is spot on – everything does change in this next slice of the adventure.

For starters, the rebels are having a tough time of it. Life is hard and dangerous as they are unceasingly harried and their comrades continually foray forth on life or death assignments and all too often don’t return. Until it is Amani’s turn to volunteer – and she finds herself in more trouble than she knows what to do with and one of the biggest mistakes she made in escaping her town now rebounds on her.

Amani is put in a position where she is forced to consider the consequences of her actions and question if what the rebels are doing is right for the inhabitants of Miraji. I really loved this aspect of the story. Firstly, considering her situation, I thought it psychologically was spot on and I also liked the extra spin it put on the worldbuilding, when we get a ringside seat as to the motivations of the antagonist. It raised the stakes, winding this adrenaline-fuelled adventure up another notch.

I thought I could see how this was going to end – until Hamilton suddenly threw a massive spanner in the works and pulled yet another game-changing plot twist right at the end. Marvellous stuff. While ending that particular storyline satisfactorily, once more everything has been thrown up in the air – and I will be fretting for another slice of this wonderful world for the rest of the year.

While I obtained the arc of Traitor to the Throne from the publisher via NetGalley, this has in no way influenced my unbiased review.
10/10