Tag Archives: contemporary crime

Sunday Post – 23rd December, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

Standard

This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

It’s been another whirlwind week. I’ve been rushing around like a blue-bottomed fly getting presents wrapped, writing and sending off cards and organising the food for Christmas, which isn’t quite as straightforward as it sounds, given that my son is vegan and we are vegetarian.

On Monday, I travelled to my daughter’s house to deliver the Christmas cards and pressies as I wouldn’t be seeing them over the Christmas break. I had great fun playing with baby Eliza, who is growing at a rate of knots. She fell asleep in my arms and once more I was swept with that painful wave of love which stops the breath in my lungs and makes each heartbeat hurt – a now-familiar sensation since the birth of my first grandchild. They’ll say something, or tilt their head in a particular way – and I’m suffused with that fierce feeling all over again. We went out for lunch together and then I made my way back home when Rebecca had to leave for the school run.

My son arrived on Wednesday and will be staying until after Christmas, which is a great treat, given that I don’t get a chance to see him all that often. Yesterday, I attended a lovely party where we sang seasonal songs around the piano and today, after we did the final supermarket run, we Skyped my mother-in-law, who is celebrating her birthday today. Other than food, I now have all the other Christmas chores completed – yippee!

Last week I read:
A Big Ship at the Edge of the Universe – Book 1 of The Salvagers series by Alex White
Boots Elsworth was a famous treasure hunter in another life, but now she’s washed up. She makes her meager living faking salvage legends and selling them to the highest bidder, but this time she might have stumbled on something real–the story of the Harrow, a famous warship, capable of untold destruction. Nilah Brio is the top driver in the Pan Galactic Racing Federation and the darling of the racing world–until she witnesses the murder of a fellow racer. Framed for the murder and on the hunt to clear her name, Nilah only has one lead: the killer also hunts a woman named Boots.
I really enjoyed this magical, futuristic adventure set in a post-apocalyptic world, recovering after a brutal pan-galactic war. There is plenty of action-packed mayhem, which didn’t prevent me from steadily bonding with the main protagonists.

 

Hurricane – Book 3 of the Hive Mind series by Janet Edwards
Eighteen-year-old Amber is the youngest of the five telepaths who protect the hundred million citizens of one of the great hive cities of twenty-sixth century Earth. Her job is hunting down criminals before they commit their crimes, but this time a simple case leads on to something far bigger. This is a case where Amber’s team have to face the unknown and break all the rules they usually follow, while Amber has extra burdens she can’t share with anyone. She has a personal mystery to solve, and questions she wants answered, but curiosity is a dangerous trait in a telepath.
I’ve enjoyed this series from Edwards – but this is the best book so far. It answers questions about this world that have been niggling since the first one of the series, while the crime investigation provides plenty of tension and action. Review to follow.

 

There Will Be Hell to Pay by Benjamin Gilad
They say those who get deep into the Kabbalah’s mystical text of the celestial spheres can lose their minds. But one man discovers the celestial spheres are far from saintly. The man, Jack Merriman, is a Seer sucked into the celestial realm against his better judgment. He finds out Satan is a beautiful female with a keen sense of justice. Archangel Michael sounds just like James Earl Jones and the Cherubs fill the Celestial spheres with heavenly elevator music. But underneath, the Celestial Spheres are as political and incompetent as a big government agency.
This quirky paranormal investigative story has an interesting premise. I shall be reviewing it in due course.

My posts last week:

Review of Academic Curveball – Book 1 of the Braxton Campus mysteries by James J. Cudney

Teaser Tuesday featuring Hurricane – Book 3 of the Hive Mind series by Janet Edwards

Christmas-Holiday Gifts – Science Fiction and Fantasy for Everyone

Review of The Death Chamber – Book 6 of The Detective’s Daughter series by Lesley Thomson

Friday Face-Off featuring Hogfather – Book 20 of The Discworld series by Terry Pratchett

Review of How To Steal a Dragon’s Sword – Book 9 of the How To Train Your Dragon series by Cressida Cowell

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Friday Face-Off: Seasonal “Ho, Ho, Ho.” https://perfectlytolerable.com/2018/12/21/friday-face-off-seasonal/ This is my favourite meme and Brittany nails it this week by featuring
How The Grinch Stole Christmas – which is your favourite cover?

Echo of Love https://thelonelyauthorblog.com/2018/12/21/echo-of-love/ This time of year is particularly tough on those grieving or lonely – and this beautiful, thoughtful poem reminds us of this…

How The Left Hand of Darkness Changed Everything by Becky Chambers https://lithub.com/how-the-left-hand-of-darkness-changed-everything/ The Lit Hub featured this wonderful article by one of our most talented science fiction authors…

Indian Tea/ Chai Walla(भारतीय चाय, चाई वाल्ला) https://historyofkingpanwars.wordpress.com/2018/12/19/indian-tea-chai-walla This fascinating and detailed article includes videos and a history of growing and drinking tea on the Indian continent.

Things We Say Today Which We Owe to Shakespeare https://blogging807.wordpress.com/2018/12/17/things-we-say-today-which-we-owe-to-shakespeare/ My blogging pal, Rae Longest reblogged this post. It’s a response to all those who claim Shakespeare is no longer relevant to modern life.

In the meantime, many thanks for taking the time to comment, like and visit my blog – have a wonderful holiday, whatever your beliefs and wherever you are…

Advertisements

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc Kindred Spirits – Book 5 of the Gabriel Ash and Hazel Best series by Jo Bannister #Brainfluffbookreview #KindredSpiritbookreview

Standard

I wanted a break from my usual diet of SFF reads and this cover caught my eye. I requested it, as I generally like the output from Severn House Publishing, who release a steady stream of well written and well edited crime and adventure fiction.

A kidnap attempt outside the school gates in broad daylight convinces Gabriel Ash that his renegade wife is trying to steal their sons from him. Only the intervention of his friend Constable Hazel Best kept them safe. It’s a simple if alarming explanation, but is it the truth? Hazel uncovers disturbing information about another crime, the repercussions of which are still threatening innocent lives seventeen years later.

That is half the blurb, but it gives you a good idea of what is going on. And no… I haven’t read any of the previous four books in the series – I did my usual trick of crashing midway into this series and once again, got away with it. Bannister drops in any details about the protagonists’ backstory that impacts on the action and characterisation without resorting to any info dumps. It helps that both characters are good people striving to do their best under tricky conditions. Gabriel Ash has clearly had a torrid time of it in previous books and is busy putting his life together as a single father running a book shop. Clever, sensitive and rather battered, he also has a dog who communicates telepathically with him… he thinks.

Hazel Best is a bright, determined woman whose police career has been compromised by previous shenanigans earlier in the series. One of the few people who now give her the time of day, other than a rather busy Gabriel, is Dave Gorman, her superior. When she gets a bee in her bonnet about exactly who was the target in the attempted kidnapping outside the school, events take off.

This well-written police procedural rolls forward at a reasonable clip, with a good mix of possible suspects. My one grizzle is the dog’s role in unravelling the mystery – given that everything else is so very much set in the world of fact, the dog chatting to Gabriel didn’t convince me. I would have preferred it if this had been left more open so that while Gabriel thinks it’s down to the dog, the rest of us could see another option – and if Bannister intended it to read like that, she didn’t quite succeed.

However, that isn’t a dealbreaker. I would happily pick up another book in this series and it is recommended for fans of cosy crime, particularly dog lovers. While I obtained an arc of Kindred Spirit from the publisher via Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
8/10

Sunday Post – 18th June 2017

Standard

This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Book Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

Last Sunday was once again all about the garden. I’m very carefully not saying anything about the weather except that it isn’t raining and it isn’t cold, as last time I bragged about the marvellous sunshine we were having on my Sunday Post, we had gale-force winds and torrential rain for the next five days.

It has been a very busy week as my sister has finally arrived from France and is busy moving into a flat just up the road. I have been helping her buy furniture and sort out where important things like the best supermarket, the local branch of her bank, and furniture stores are. Once she has settled in, I’m really looking forward to showing her all the lovely walks and beauty spots around here. I still cannot quite believe she will only be living five minutes away from me.

On Thursday, Tim took his first external exam. We don’t know whether he has passed it or not, but he did brilliantly – remaining so calm throughout and answering all questions. I’m so proud of how hard he has worked to get where he is.

As you will see below, I haven’t got much reading done this week as my sister was staying with us for the first five days, only moving into her flat on Friday. We had a lot of catching up to do…

This week I have read:

The Dog Walker – Book 5 of the Detective’s Daughter series by Lesley Thomson
January, 1987. In the depths of winter, only joggers and dog walkers brave the Thames towpath after dark. Helen Honeysett, a young newlywed, sets off for an evening run from her riverside cottage and disappears. Twenty-nine years later, Helen’s body has never been found. Her husband has asked Stella Darnell, a private detective, and her side-kick Jack Harmon, to find out what happened all those years ago. But when the five households on that desolate stretch of towpath refuse to give up their secrets, Stella and Jack find themselves hunting a killer whose trail has long gone cold.
I thoroughly enjoyed this one. One of the reasons why this is the only book I’ve read this week, is that The Dog Walker – with the steady drip feeding of clues, potential suspects and witnesses – deserves to be read slowly, so I took my time and savoured it. I will be reviewing it in due course.

My posts last week:

Sunday Post – 11th June 2017

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of River of Teeth – Book 1 of the River of Teeth novella series by Sarah Gailey

Teaser Tuesday featuring A Peace Divided – Book 2 of the Peacekeeper series by Tanya Huff

Review of The Sorcerer’s Garden by D. Wallace Peach

Review of The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan

Friday Face-off – My guitar is not a thing. It is an extension of myself featuring Soul Music – Book 16 of the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of Borne by Jeff VanderMeer

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Events – What to look forward to in Summer 2017http://earthianhivemind.net/2017/06/15/events-look-forward-summer-2017/ A very useful mini-roundup of some major events for SFF book lovers in particular – is anyone going to these?

Lessons Learned from John Kaag: Re-route, Re-boothttps://jeanleesworld.com/2017/06/15/lessons-learned-from-john-kaag-re-route-re-root/ Another beautiful, profound article from this talented writer on negotiating family life…

#WhenDreamsComeTrue with Sarah Hardy Publicist at Bloodhound Books https://mychestnutreadingtree.wordpress.com/2017/06/16/whendreamscometrue-with-sarah-hardy-publicist-at-bloodhound-books-sarahhardy681-bloodhoundbook/ A lovely article about how a woman is in the process of achieving her dream job

The Leaning Tower of Pisahttps://photolicioux.wordpress.com/2017/06/03/the-leaning-tower-of-pisa/ I love this photo…

Please Do Not Support my Patreonhttp://writerunboxed.com/2017/06/17/please-do-not-support-my-patreon/ The hilarious Bill Ferris strikes again on yet another how-not-to article for aspiring writers and bloggers…

Thank you for visiting and taking the time and trouble to comment – and may you have a wonderful reading and blogging week.

*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL*Review of KINDLE Ebook So Many Boots, So Little Time –Book 3 of The MisAdventures of Miss Lilly series by Kalan Chapman Lloyd

Standard

I needed a change, thought the blurb sounded entertaining and so went for it. It’s certainly a change of genre and pace from my normal speculative fiction fare…

somanybootsSmall-town lawyer Lilly Atkins has calmed down. She’s doing yoga, her hair is relatively tame, and she hasn’t shot anyone in a while. But with bad boy Cash Stetson out of rehab, former FBI agent-turned-attorney Spencer Locke dogging her steps, and a ghost from her past who just won’t go away, her trigger finger is starting to itch.

Chapman Lloyd’s snappy writing is engagingly readable and she pulled me effortlessly into Lilly’s mid-western world of cowboys, ranches where men are rough and tough, guns are an everyday accessory and women are judged as much by their baking and cooking skills as their appearance. And appearance matters a lot to Lilly. Unusually these days, we get a rundown of everyone’s clothing and footwear as Lilly meets up with them – every time… To be honest, this got a tad wearing throughout the book. Especially as Lilly’s crisis of confidence on being confronted with the two main failed relationships in her life manifests itself in her trying on a number of different clothing styles. While the clothing descriptions were slickly done, because I have little interest in the clothing industry and even less knowledge – the designer labels regularly tossed around meant nothing to me.

The main mystery – the loss of her grandfather’s cattle – became more or less incidental as Lilly ricocheted from one encounter with a concerned parent/disapproving friend/manipulative male to another confrontation. Think Kinsey Milhone without the gnarly murder and in airhead mode. I would have liked to see her working on a case as an attorney where something really mattered, because as far as I could see, she didn’t do very much except get under the feet of her family and annoy long-suffering Spencer.

It didn’t help that this copy was riddled with formatting and typographical errors – on accepting an arc one doesn’t expect a perfect copy, but there was hardly a page where words weren’t run together, lines broken in the wrong place or occasional punctuation errors. While Chapman Lloyd’s writing is mostly smooth and stylish, there were places where it plain graunched, giving me the impression this version had only been slightly edited.

So why didn’t this book go flying across the room and end up as a DNF? Because, despite all of that, Chapman Lloyd managed to make me care for exasperating Lilly and I found all the worldbuilding details enjoyably engrossing. There is a definite charm to this book and once I got to the end, I put it down with a grin.
7/10