Tag Archives: book covers

Friday Faceoff – We are all like the bright Moon; we still have our darker side… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffmooncovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week, we are featuring covers with the word MOON in the title. I’ve selected The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein.

Hodder & Stoughton, March 2005

This cover was produced by Hodder & Stoughton in March 2005 and caught my eye because of the funky author font which really pops. I’m a bit surprised at the very plain treatment of the title font by comparison, given what a famous book this is, as well as being a bit disappointment. Other than that, I think the spaceships/prison cells are a bit generic. I would have liked to have seen at least a nod to the 1960s within the cover design out of respect for this book’s longevity.

Gollancz, December 2008

Published in December 2008 by Gollancz, this SF Masterworks edition is rather disappointing. The title and cover fonts are utterly plain and underwhelming, to the extent that in thumbnail, they completely disappear. While the cover design is very generic – that could be any old planetary satellite, with any old spaceship approaching. Given how used we are to iconic moonscapes after 1966, I feel the designers could have done a lot better.

Berkley Medallion, September 1968

This edition, published in September 1968 by Berkley Medallion, is a bit more like it! That setting is recognisably the moon, with one of the railguns that Heinlein featured in this revolutionary story. While the fonts are rather boring, at least they are easily readable when this cover is in thumbnail. And the design and feel of the cover is of the period when this ground-breaking book was first published.

Berkley, May 1981

Published by Berkley in May 1981, this is my favourite. I love the period feel, the lunar landscape and the drama of the spacecraft crashing in the foreground. I also love the treatment of the author font – it looks fabulous. And the icing on the cake is that we also have Earth hanging in the sky. I only wish the book’s title had been given just a bit more care and attention. That said, I think this cover really jumps out in comparison to the previous offerings and would certainly tempt me to reach for it.

New English Library, 1998

This edition, published in 1998 by New English Library is so nearly a contender. I love the remains of the spacesuit, with an arm still clutching a gun in the foreground which creates a real sense of drama. And it is also refreshing to see the title actually appearing in colour. However what stops this one from being my favourite is the appearance of that huge planet in the sky – really?? Who towed the Moon so much closer to Earth – or have we now imported another planet into the Solar System in the near future? This sloppy mistake is a dealbreaker for me. But which one do you like best?

Friday Faceoff –Perfect love is to feeling what perfect white is to color… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffwhitecovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week – the first of 2021 – we are featuring WHITE covers. I’ve selected The One by John Marrs – see my review.

Edbury Digital, January 2017

This is one of the default covers, produced by Edbury Digital in January 2017. It is my favourite cover, as I think the heart is eye-catching and clever and I also like the strapline. The detailing of the genetic sequencing around the edge in the blue also works well – a nicely subtle touch that finishes the cover with a pleasing border. It was always going to be a challenge to design a suitably appropriate cover that didn’t give the impression that this is a love story – and I think this one achieves that brief really effectively.

Hanover Square Press, March 2018

Published in March 2018 by Hanover Square Press, this design takes a variation on the previous cover, with the obvious main difference being the initial O becoming a splatter of blood containing a fingerprint. I do wonder if the blood spatter gives this design more of a horror vibe, which isn’t correct as this is more of a thriller. The border is still in place, though the use of the black rather than the pale blue gives the cover more of a grungy feel, I think.

Romanian edition, 2019

This Romanian edition, published in 2019 by Editura Trei, is the least successful of my selection, I think. The knife dripping with blood gives the impression that this a murder mystery, rather than a techno thriller. While the fontsfor both the author and title fonts are plain boring.  

Hanover Square Press, April 2019

Published by Hanover Square Press in April 2019, this is the only coloured cover in my selection. I think this one is strikingly attractive – and I like the red darts sticking out of it. The contrast between the blue and red works well. I also like the uncluttered look, though once again, I think the title font is overly plain and a tad boring, which is a shame given how successful the overall design is. This is a strong contender – I so nearly went for this one…

Maxim, June 2018

This Hungarian edition, published in June 2018 by Maxim, is also a contender. I really like how it has taken the default cover design and added His and Her. It gives the cover real interest – my only major concern is that it gives the impression that this is a romance. And while all the protagonists are searching for The One, the novel is more about the process that’s used. Which one do you prefer?

Friday Faceoff – Style is a way to say who you are without having to speak… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffstylisedcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring STYLISED covers. I’ve selected The Invisible Library – Book 1 of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman – see my review.

Pan, December 2014

This offering was produced by Pan in December 2014. This is the cover of the edition that I read, which probably has influenced my decision – because it is one of my two favourites this week. I love the lovely teal background and the nifty little details highlighted in gold, which gives a good sense of the period feel of this portal fantasy adventure. And while I don’t love the strapline, at least it has been treated as part of the overall design, rather than plopped onto the middle of the cover as an afterthought, as so often happens.

Ace, June 2016

Published in June 2016, by Ace, this cover has clearly taken its inspiration from the original, with similar styling. The main differences are the background colour – that beautiful rich blue makes the gold detailing sing out. However, I find those details create just a bit less impact and therefore don’t draw my eye as successfully as the top cover. But I suspect this week, it is going to be down to personal taste, because there is nothing essentially wrong with this design, which is still beautiful and classy.

Czech edition, October 2017

This Czech edition, published by Omega in October 2017, is my other favourite this week. I love that rich crimson background and the heavy gilded border and very elaborate detailing on the title font gives this cover a sumptuous, luxurious tone that harks back to a time when books were rare and valuable items. And what I particularly like about that dynamic, is that these are the types of books that frequently feature within The Invisible Library. It’s a dynamic which I think all these covers are reaching for – but this is the one that most successfully achieves it.

Romanian edition, March 2019


This Romanian edition, published in March 2019 by Editura Nemira, is another lovely offering. This time, the styling includes more colour and less gold and I particularly like that beautifully elaborate, steampunk-ish key featured in the middle of the design. However, I’m not so keen on those leaves popping up on the border design of the cover – that kind of flora simply doesn’t appear in this book. But I can’t deny that those little drops of red do draw the eye.

Turkish edition, March 2016

This Turkish edition, published by Timaş Yayınları in March 2016, is another lovely, stylised design. I like the mathematical feel of some of the detailing in the corners, as well as featuring the gothic detailing in the architecture of the Houses of Parliament. This one is so nearly a contender for my favourite of the week – but unfortunately, the lighter shading fades into near invisibility when in thumbnail, which was a dealbreaker, given the purpose of book covers is to draw the attention of a prospective reader. Which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – Come, Fairies, take me out of this dull world… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceofffaecovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with FAE. I’ve selected The Darkest Part of the Forest by Holly Black.

This is the default cover design, produced by Little, Brown Books in January 2015. I like this one – the treatment of the font, with the forest almost growing out and around the lettering is striking, while that blue butterfly really pops. It works especially well in thumbnail and is well balanced, while providing an appropriate mood and atmosphere for the book. This is a strong, successful cover.

Published in February 2015, by Indigo – what a difference a colour makes! The same design as the previous offering, except for the background colour. I think this throws the lettering into even sharper focus and gives a cover a real feel of the dark, enclosed forest. While the previous cover is well designed, I think this one is better – and I so very nearly went for this one…

This German edition, published in April 2017 by cbt has broken away from the default cover to give us a representation of the main teenage protagonists. Along with the mysterious forest that encompasses their story… Initially, I thought this was a bit cheesy – but the sheer attention to detail, with the deep forest, the wolf on one shoulder, the eagle circling above and the girl appearing from a forest thicket on his other shoulder – has made me a lot more appreciative of the overall design. I particularly like the roots at the bottom of the image, with bits of the soil still falling, as if it has just been yanked out of the ground.

Published by Galera Record in March 2017, this Portuguese edition is a bit more generic, with some stylised flowers and butterflies adorning the cover. While it is certainly attractive and eye-catching, I find it bland and ordinary in comparison to the previous covers. My favourite part of this cover is the quirky title and author font, which I really like and immediately elevates this design into something more original.

This Russian edition, published in 2016 by ACT, is my favourite. I find that fae staring straight out at us is mesmerising. The ears and horns superimposed on that beautiful head makes it difficult for me to look away from his unusually coloured eyes. I love the detailing of the rich fabric, even on the highly embroidered lining, along with the brocade background of the forest. I haven’t read this one – but this is the cover that makes me want to track it down and add it to my teetering TBR list. While this is my favourite, which one do you prefer?







Covet the Covers – 13 #Brainfluffcovetthecovers #CovetthecoversElizabethBear

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Welcome to another helping of Covet the Covers. This week I’m featuring Elizabeth Bear’s covers. There is a mix of fantasy and science fiction series here – and I’m really excited at just how much of her canon I have yet to read, given that I’ve recently read and loved Ancestral Night and Hammered. She is very fortunate to have had a series of fabulous covers over the years – just look at these beauties. Which are your favourites?


Friday Faceoff – The ships hung in the sky, much the way that bricks don’t… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffmodernscificovers #SciFiMonth2020

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring MODERN SCI FI covers. I’ve selected Embers of War – Book 1 of the Embers of War series by Gareth L. Powell – see my mini-review. I’m linking this article with #Sci Fi Month 2020.

Titan Books, February 2020

This offering was produced by Titan Books in February 2020. This is the default cover – and I can see why. The spacescape with a planet and it’s moon having sustained a major hit of some description, with the ship trying to outrun the massive explosion, is very dramatic. Or maybe it’s the ship blowing up – but I think the reflection within the clouds and that ominous glowing within the planet surface is more likely to be a catastrophic big bang about to engulf the planet. If I have a grizzle about this one, it’s that the title font is a little underwhelming and in thumbnail it simply disappears.

Italian edition, October 2019

Published in October 2019 by Fanucci Editore, this Italian edition is my least favourite. I love the spacescape – those cool blues and again, that ominous explosion in the background, with the ship featured in the foreground. But WHAT possessed them to then stick a couple of lines across the middle of the artwork? I’ve no idea what they are supposed to signify and they are just a distractingly ugly intrusion.

French Edition, April 2019

This French edition, published by Denoël in April 2019, is another cracking cover. I love the fact that this ship is weaving its way through an asteroid belt, giving the cover a very dramatic look, with all those ominous rocks looming out of the darkness of space. And isn’t that a cool ship – it’s got some kind of pattern across the top… I also particularly like the title font, which works really well on this edition as that hot red stands out from the darker tones in the cover. This is a real contender…


Croatian edition, 2019

This Croatian edition is another wonderful offering. Published in 2019 by Hangar 7, this cover has taken the title very literally. That ship in the foreground looks as though it’s breaking up – and we can see flying embers in the upper half of the cover against the spacescape. While below the ship, there is either a suited person, or small survival capsule trying to get away from the unfolding catastrophe. I also like the cool font, which works well. Do I like this one more than the French offering, though? I cannot make up my mind!

Russian edition, August 2020

And finally there is this Russian edition, published in August 2020. Oh wow – again, something huge is exploding on the other side of the planet – look at the waves of heat coming off the surface. And in this one, we definitely have the sentient ship, Trouble Dog, featured in the foreground. For the first time ever – I simply cannot make up my mind between the final three covers. I think they are all fabulous and I’d happily pick any one off the shelves and hand over my hard-earned cash to get hold of the story😊. But which is your favourite?


Covet the Covers – 12 #Brainfluffcovetthecovers #CovetthecoversElizabethMoon #SciFiMonth2020

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Welcome to another helping of Covet the Covers. This week I’m featuring Elizabeth Moon’s space opera Vatta’s War and Serrano Legacy covers in honour of #Sci Fi Month 2020, which I’m linking with this post. I have chosen to feature the Orbit publication of the Serrano Legacy series, as it’s my personal favourite…

I love her writing – check out my review of the Serrano Legacy. But this only represents some of her output – I haven’t included the two books in the Vatta’s Peace series, A Cold Welcome, which I think is one of the best books she has written, and the sequel, Into the Fire – or her superb Speed of Dark, which is an awesome standalone.

I think her books have helped to define the genre into what it is now and if you haven’t read either of these series and are looking for a gripping, exciting space opera adventure featuring brave, feisty women, then track down Trading into Danger.


Friday Faceoff – Words are free – it’s how you use them that can cost… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffwordscovers #SciFiMonth2020

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with WORDS. I’ve selected Artemis by Andy Weir and linked this post to #Sci Fi Month 2020. See my reviews of The Martian and Artemis.

Crown, November 2017

This hardcover edition was produced by Crown in November 2017. To be honest, I think it’s just dreary. The story is a foot-to-the floor thriller set on the Moon. And with all the black, black, blacketty black going on, I don’t think you’d know it. Worse – in thumbnail both the author and title fonts simply disappear. I think this cover fails on almost every level.

Ballantine, July 2018

Published in July 2018 by Ballantine, at least this grey effort gives us an idea of the Moon. And though I’m not sure exactly why it’s there, I quite like the orange strip running down the length of the cover. Though perhaps I’m just craving something – anything else, other than GREY.

Del Rey, November 2017

At least this edition, published by Del Rey in November 2017, is an improvement over the previous miserable offerings. Though I can’t help thinking the girl staring out at us through her space helmet is a not-very-subtle reminder that this is the author of The Martian, given that one of the default covers was Matt Damon was gazing at us. And just in case we missed that allusion, there is lump of blurb telling us. Which has ruined this one for me.

Russian edition, December 2017

This Russian edition, produced by ACT in December 2017, is more like it! I love this image of the Moon, limned around the edge by the Sun. It is glorious and gives a wonderful pop of colour and excitement. And there is also a cool spaceship in the foreground… While I could have done without the MUST READ docket hanging off the ship exhaust, this is my favourite cover by a long light year.

Lithuanian edition, August 2019


This Lithuanian edition, published by BALTO leidybos namai in August 2019 is also a better effort than the top two miserable efforts. I like the figure against the craters of the Moon, though the scale and detail is slightly puzzling. And I definitely like the title running down the centre of the cover in red lettering. But which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – A bright future beckons… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffbrightfuturecovers #SciFiMonth2020

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring BRIGHT FUTURISTIC covers. I’ve selected Synners by Pat Cadigan – see my review – and I’ve linked this post to #Sci Fi Month 2020

Thunder’s Mouth Press, October 2001

This edition was produced by Thunder’s Mouth Press in October 2001. It’s a really clever, eye-catching cover with the face in the bottom half nicely contrasting with that intense red above it. And a mushroom cloud effect made by a brain… So this cover works on all sorts of levels with this classic book. I particularly love the title font running right up the centre of cover and through the mushroom cloud/brain – and the fact that it is made of dots – a bit like one of the earlier printers.

Gollancz, 2012

Published in August 2012 by Gollancz, this Masterworks edition is another successful cyberpunk cover. The cityscape outlined against the grungy yellow backdrop can also double as synapses or brain connections. While that face staring out at us looks mournful and slightly wrong. This is the cover of the book that I read, so I have a soft spot for it, memorable and disturbing as it is.

Spectra, February 1991

This edition, published by Spectra in February 1991 is so nearly my favourite. I love the colour and chaos of it – and the slightly old fashioned feel, which is achieved by the use of that large, colourful font that some of the publishers – Baen, in particular – used as their trademark in the 1980s.

HarperCollins, October 1991

This hardcover edition, produced by HarperCollins in October 1991, is my favourite. It’s a classier version of the second cover, playing with the same theme. I love the unusual aspect of the face tilted back as if the character is sunk into a VR trance. The lines running from the cyberscape up, across her neck and face pull your attention back to it, and create stronger links between the two. I particularly love the detail where it looks as though her face is starting to depixelate across her forehead. Again, this cover works on so many levels.

Polish edition, March 2003

This Polish edition, published by Solaris in March 2003 was the one that popped into my head when I thought of bright covers. It is great fun, but I don’t like it quite as much as the others. That ugly box in the right-hand cover, in particular, really spoils the look of the overall design and neither am I a fan of the rather clunky text box across the top of the cover. What about you – which is your favourite?

Covet the Covers – 11 #Brainfluffcovetthecovers #CovetthecoversLoisMcMasterBujold #SciFiMonth2020

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Welcome to another helping of Covet the Covers, aka Cover Love. This week I’m featuring Lois McMaster Bujold’s Miles Vorkosigan science fiction covers in honour of #Sci Fi Month 2020, which I’m linking to this post.

We are both huge fans of her writing – check out my reviews of Cryoburn, Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen and The Flowers of Vashnoi, which are all part of this long-running, highly successful space opera adventure that helped to redefine the genre into something more nuanced and interesting. Bujold showed herself years ahead of many of her contemporaries in following the fortunes of a highly driven, alpha male desperate to prove himself when growing up in a warrior-caste society, while coping with significant physical disabilities. His paternal grandfather had wanted him to be quietly euthanised as a baby… My favourite is the cover for Cryoburn – which is yours?