Category Archives: Lynn’s Book Blog

Friday Faceoff – What would it be like to live in a universe with two dimensions of space and two of time? #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week at least one of our covers has to be grainy or look like WHITE NOISE, so I’ve selected Dichronauts by Greg Egan.

 

This Kindle edition was produced by Greg Egan himself in March 2017. I love the design, which is also a visual manifestation of the physics behind this amazing world that Egan has constructed. It is both beautiful and eye-catching. Despite the nasty orange font for the title and author, this is by far the most details and awesome depiction of this design and is therefore my favourite. By the way, if you are interested in exploring the physics behind the world of the dichronauts – this is a LINK to Egan’s site explaining his ideas.

 

Published in July 2017 by Night Shade, this cover is a close reworking of the original. I miss those beautiful colours in the centre of the hyperboloid, and the author name and title have been better handled. I also wish there was less distracting chatter so readers could better appreciate the beauty of this remarkable design.

 

This audiobook edition, published by Tantor Audio in July 2017 doesn’t go in for the whole shape, but gives just a slice of it. I think it’s a shame that the beauty of the whole hourglass has been chopped down – but I’m guessing it’s because of the different size and scale of the cover.

 

Produced by Night Shade Books in July 2017, this edition so nearly gives us the original Egan design completely unadorned. While I do love the notion of providing the whole design without messing it up with details like the title and author, there isn’t quite the beauty and depth of the Egan offering. Which is your favourite?

 

Obviously, this cannot count, because it isn’t a book cover – but it is the gif of the dichronaut world that Egan is depicting. I think it’s lovely…

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Friday Faceoff – Wrap your mind around my thoughts as I wrap my soul around your heart… #BrainfluffFridayFaceoff #FridayFaceoffWraparound

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week is a WRAPAROUND cover, so I have selected Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling because it’s just lovely. I hope you like it, too😊

 

Friday Faceoff – There is no friend as loyal as a book… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is something STRIPED – and I officially declare myself beaten. The only cover I found I didn’t like all that much, anyway. So I decided to play a WILD CARD that Lynn has suggested we use – and I’ve featured a book that I loved – The Stone Sky – Book 3 of The Broken Earth series by the mighty N.K. Jemisin.

 

This edition was produced by Orbit in August 2017. I love this cover and it’s my favourite. The intense colours are beautiful and the artwork otherworldly and haunting. Small wonder this cover is the default with only a few exceptions. I even like the rather ordinary font, which this time around works well. Of course, it could just be that I was so blown away by the intense reading experience I encountered when diving into this book that I’m somewhat biased.

 

Published in September 2018 by J’ai Lu, I really like this French edition. The intense blue of the sky, the great orb hanging in the sky below and those stones breaking the soil at odd angles give this cover eye appeal and correlate with the book’s story. What absolutely doesn’t work are those ugly white textboxes bisecting the artwork. The effect looks like two strips of paper with the typewritten information have been stuck across the covers – what a shame!

 

This Hungarian edition, published by Agave Könyvek in August 2018 has gone back to the colours of the default cover, but taken a less abstract approach. The result is a really cool, very attractive cover. If this had been the cover of my reading copy, I think I would have been more torn, because I think it is very effective. As it is, it comes a close second.

 

Produced by Subterranean Press in September 2018, this is also a very attractive, powerful offering. I like the way it features the two main protagonists – the mother and her lost daughter and having that beautiful triangular text box slicing them apart works really well. The other thing I love about this cover – Jemisin has clearly written these characters as black and I’m delighted the publishers have featured them as such.

 

This Chinese edition, published by 天地出版社 in March 2018 is another strong offering. I love the image of the skyscape where it looks as though you could actually step on those clouds in shades of an attractive tangerine. The downside for me is that black textbox slammed across the bottom of the cover, cutting off the rest of the artwork. There also seems to be a great deal of chatter across the cover – but as my understanding of Chinese isn’t worth a nocked nail, it may well be the explanation might be necessary to an audience unused to the genre, so I’ll give them a pass on that.
Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Ô, Sunlight! The most precious gold to be found on Earth… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is the SUMMER SOLSTICE, seeing as this is the longest day of the year in this hemisphere. I’ve selected The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon.

 

This edition was produced by Random House Children’s Publishers UK in October 2016. This is the default cover for this YA best-seller and it’s easy to see why. I love the colours and the fabulous effect of the different embroidery threads. Somewhere online, I recall seeing the footage of the master being made – because, yes, the cover was actually stitched. It’s my favourite.

 

Published in June 2017 by Bonnier Carlsen, this Swedish edition has the potential to be successful, particularly with the contrast between the yellow and black, which always works well. However they then sabotaged the effectiveness of that strong colour selection, by insisting on including almost everything that occurs in the book in a series of line drawings, which makes the effect too busy and cluttered to be really effective.

 

This Romanian edition, published by Editura Young Art have overcome the issue that makes this something of a problem for foreign language editions – given the cover was initially stitched with the title in English – by stitching their own version. I very much like it, but the colours lack the vibrancy and impact of the original cover chiefly because the thread is finer.

 

This Indonesian edition, produced by Spring in April 2017, have taken a different approach to that stitched cover with a wonderful cover that is my second favourite. I love this one – so beautiful and striking. It also references some of the themes/subjects that feature in the book – because if there is an issue with that original cover, is that it isn’t immediately apparent that it is basically a YA romance.

 

This Vietnamese edition, published in May 2019 by Wings Books, has taken yet another approach. I really like the blocky bold depiction of the sun within that lovely rich blue background – it’s colourful and eye-catching and nicely references the title. My one grizzle is that the white title font is very boring and while I love the creative arrangement of the lettering amongst the ends of the sunrays, I feel there is a risk of the title getting lost amongst the design. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – If there’s no chocolate in Heaven, I’m not going… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week SOMETHING SWEET has to feature on any of our covers, so I’ve selected Friends, Lovers, Chocolate – Book 2 of Isabel Dalhousie series by Alexander McCall Smith.

 

This edition was produced by Pantheon Books in September 2005. I like the design – the colourful shop front and pavement café looks delightfully enticing. But that horrid textbox slapped across the top blocks out far too much of the design – and given the café is at a slight angle and the textbox isn’t, the resulting clash of perspectives is jarring. If only it hadn’t been there – this one would definitely have been my favourite… *sigh*.

 

Published in August 2006 by Anchor Books, this cover is harking back to the past. The plain bright yellow really pops and I like the contrast with the chocolate brown for the borders, artwork and text, which gives it a classic feel. The touch of tartan and the dramatic hand dropping the cup of chocolate all give appropriate clues as to what the book is about. I really like this one.

 

This edition, published by Abacus in July 2006 has also gone for the vintage vibe. The bold, blocky artwork, strong primary colours and clear, capitalised text all refer back to the mid-20th century and the heyday of the whodunit. This is another strong candidate for this week’s favourite – I really like this one.

 

Produced by Little Brown in 2005, this is my favourite. I love the artwork, the chocolate drink, the rather natty glove draped over The Scotsman newspaper – all very nicely done. The lavender sprigs down the side also provide further eye appeal.

 

This French edition, published by Editions des Deux Terres in September 2013 is another strong contender. I love the image of the delicious chocolate cake with the single bite taken out of it – somehow more effective than a pristine slice. And while I’m not a fan of plain white backgrounds, this time it really works. I also think the lettering, both of the author and title is attractive and effective. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Summertime and the living is easy… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is SUMMERTIME, so I’ve selected The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan.

 

This edition was produced by William Morrow in February 2017. I really love this cover. The attractive backdrop with the sprigs of the Tudor red and white rose gives a sense of permanence and old fashioned values – an impression rounded off by that solid-looking title font and the ornate key. I love this cover, which is my favourite, though this week it’s a close-run thing.

 

Published in February 2017 by William Morrow, this is the definitive cover for this book and is another lovely effort. In amongst the sprays of peonies are some of those lost things which feature in the story. The black background makes these images really pop. I also like the design of title and author fonts, but my chief niggle with this cover is the blurb crammed at the top of the cover, cluttering up and throwing off the symmetry of the whole design.

 

This edition, published by Two Roads in July 2017 demonstrates just much difference a colour change can make to the overall appearance of a cover. That lovely cheerful yellow background with the teal coloured font gives a delightfully sunny feel to this design. And just look how the lack of all that chatter gives a cleaner, more coherent feel to the whole design. I far prefer this strategy of putting a stripe down the side proclaiming the success of this book – especially with the clever use of the font colour and a slice of the flower. This is so very nearly my favourite…

 

Produced by HarperCollins Holland in March 2017, this is another attractive, well crafted design. Indeed, with the shelves holding a number of those lost things of the title, this is probably the most coherent cover in this selection. However, the title and author fonts are fading into the sprigged wallpaper due to a poor choice of colour and underwhelming font – what an odd choice…

 

This Ukrainian edition, published by Клуб сімейного дозвілля in August 2016, is a really charming, quirky effort that also accurately reflects the book. I love this cover, which is also a close contender for my favourite, but it was the expanse of white in the centre and the heavily italicised font that decided me against it. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – …like a garden needs a flower, like a castle needs a tower… #FridayFaceoff #Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we get to feature our FAVOURITE FANTASY covers, so I’ve selected a series of covers which I consider to be awesome by DAW for the Green Rider series by Kristen Britain.

 

This edition of Green Rider was produced by DAW on 4th November, 2008. Isn’t it breathtaking? It gives me goosebumps and a zing of pleasure every time I look at it… And yes… I’m sure the title and author fonts get lost in thumbnail – in fact I know they do. But I really don’t care – because… look at that fabulous horse. Just look…

 

Published in on 3rd April 2004 by DAW, First Rider’s Call is the second book in this series which has again another fabulous cover, featuring another stunning piece of artwork featuring another beautiful winged horse.

 

This edition of the third book in the series, The High King’s Tomb, published by DAW on 6th November 2007 is another beautiful effort. Enough said, really…

 

Produced by DAW on 1st February 2011, this is their cover design for Blackveil – the fourth book in the series. And no – I’m not going to choose between these. I love them all…

 

This edition of the fifth book in the series, Mirror Sight, this time published by Gollancz on 14th March 2015, continues with more Pegasus wondrousness. I’m a bit sad that DAW, who began these awesome covers at this point reverted to something more ordinary, leaving Gollancz to continue to be the standard-bearer for these stunning examples.

 

And last, but by no means least, is the final book in the series, Firebrand, produced by Gollancz on 9th March 2017. Yet again, just a joy to look at… What do you think of my all-time favourite fantasy covers?

 

Friday Faceoff – Fire burn and cauldron bubble… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is MAGICAL THINGS, so I’ve selected A Discovery of Witches – Book 1 of the All Souls Trilogy by Deborah Harkness, despite the fact that only two of my covers feature anything remotely magical – those runes and the grimoire…

 

This edition was produced by Viking Penguin in February 2011 and is clearly the default cover. I really like the graduated night sky as a backdrop and the iconic Oxford cityscape and well as the effectively eye-catching title font with that enjoyable flourish on the A. However, there are some decisions that have compromised the impact of this classy effort. Why all that chatter had to be crammed under the author is a mystery – why can’t it go on the back cover, along with the blurb? And plonking the Penguin right by the rune seems a bizarre move. Instead of focusing on the book, I found myself wondering why the logo wasn’t tucked neatly right in the bottom left or right-hand corner as is more usual…

 

Published in February 2011 by Headline, this cover is set during the day, though still featuring the cityscape, especially the Bodleian. Instead of magical runes, this time there is a red aura/magical miasma wafting across the sky. The less cluttered approach works better and though I’m not sure I prefer this design, I do think this cover has more eye appeal than the previous one.

 

This edition, published by Headline in September 2011, has done away with Oxford as part of the backdrop and this time around has gone for a matt black background with that red magical aura wisping across the cover. The author’s name nearly disappears in thumbnail, given the dark red doesn’t exactly ping off the background. This generic approach is a disappointment, especially compared to the previous two covers.

 

Produced by Orbit in May 2011, this French edition takes a completely different tack. The monochrome colours work well and I’m pleased to see Oxford feature once again. However, I think the silhouetted girl looks far too young and uncertain to be Diana Bishop. Given this is set in 2009, what is she doing wearing a mini-skirt?

 

This Croatian edition, published in 2011 is my favourite. I love the fact we are right in the middle of Oxford, right outside the Bodleian library in the middle of the night. And right in the foreground is the book that kicks off this story, pages fluttering and moonlit… So cool and appropriate. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Beware the jabberwock, my son… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is FANTASY BEASTS, so I’ve selected The Red Knight – Book 1 of The Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron – see my review here.

 

This edition was produced by Gollancz in October 2012 and is my favourite. It didn’t hurt that this is the cover of the edition that I read. I love the simplicity of the fully armoured knight fighting the wyvern – and how his foot is on the top of the title font, which is stylish and feels part of the overall design. The artwork is beautiful and detailed and it’s no surprise that this cover is the one that appears on most editions.

 

Published in January 2013 by Orbit, while this cover is clearly dramatic with the flames licking the sword – I find it rather generic. This could be any knight clutching any sword, though why anyone would want to roast their precious weapon is a puzzle. I do like the font, however, which works well within the design.

 

This German edition, published by Heyne in June 2013, is another strong offering. I really like the weathered parchment effect, with the slight blurring of the author and title fonts, as if this precious document has become wet at some stage. The engraving of the sword gives a sense of the medieval era, albeit an alternate timeline where wyverns and dark magic menaces the land.

 

Produced by Bragelonne in January 2017, this French edition once again features a hand holding the sword, but I think it is far more successful than Orbit’s effort. For starters, the detailing on the sleeve and the blood-spattered gauntlet feels more connected to the book than some random character holding a sword in a fire. I also love the background, which also had been given some serious consideration. The ornate lettering capitalising the title font manages to give it a period feel without compromising the clarity. This classy effort is a close contender, but for the fact that I’m a sucker for that wyvern.

 

This Russian edition, published by Фантастика Книжный Клуб in December 2016 uses the original cover as its inspiration, going back to the battle between the red knight and the wyvern. I’d expected this to be my second favourite, but I find the figures – particularly the fabulous beast – lacking in the fluid lines that add to the drama of the original. This stilted version simply isn’t as well executed, however I do like the addition of that red border which works really well against the grey background. Which is your favourite?

 

Friday Faceoff – Blue oblivion, largely lit, smiled and smiled at me… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoff

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week at least one of our covers has to be BLUE, so I’ve selected Daughter of Smoke and Bone – Book 1 of the Daughter of Smoke and Bone series by Laini Taylor.

 

This edition was produced by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers in September 2011. The monochrome face with that fantastic blue feathered mask is very eye-catching and I also really love the title font, which is both striking and effective. This one is so very nearly my favourite…

 

Published in August 2015 by Fischer Taschenbubh, this German cover is another strong contender. I love the shades of blue patterns backlighting the Prague cityscape. The girl looks otherworldly with the treatment to her eyes and the title font is also stylish and eye-catching. Yet another well designed and beautiful cover, wholly appropriate in tone and mood for this enjoyable fantasy adventure.

 

This edition, published by Hodder & Stoughton in September 2011, is my favourite. I love, love, LOVE those fabulous feathers with the iridescent sheen in all the shades of a sunlit starling. My choice might be influenced by the fact that this is the cover of the book that I read – I also think the title font is very well done.

 

Produced by De Boekerij in April 2013, this Dutch edition is yet another superb effort, being a variation on the design of the first cover. The mask is beautifully designed and the colours shading the title font replicate those colours, intensifying the lovely effect with the clever repetition. Another accomplished and appropriate cover for this book.

 

This Indonesian edition, published by Gramedia Pustaka Utama in September 2012, is yet another well-designed cover. If this had been a different book, I would be raving more about the restraint… the clever, subtle blue shading around the edge of the single feather… the way that colour is picked up and reflected in the stylish title font. But there are so many wonderful, classy covers for this particular book, it is just added to the list – lucky, lucky Laini Taylor! Which one is your favourite?