Category Archives: book covers

Friday Faceoff – Dogs are our link to paradise… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffdogcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with DOGS. I’ve selected Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky – see my review.



This offering was produced by Head of Zeus in November 2017. This is the default cover for this book – and is clever and eye-catching. It is one of those covers you look at once, twice and then see something else there. The warm colours work well and I like the large, blocky title font. My niggle is that this book isn’t all about a pack of ravening beasts – it is a genetically crafted wardog that stands seven feet tall and the cover isn’t representing that content.

 

Published in October 2019, by French publisher Denoël, I think this is cover is shocker. It is ugly, unclear and worst of all – completely misleading. The genre it projects is dark, dystopian sci-fi horror – and this book isn’t anything like that. Yes, Tchaikovsky writes some gritty battle scenes, but that isn’t the focus or narrative engine of this book. It devolves into a courtroom drama as the ethics behind producing genetically altered animals as a weapon of war are examined. And this cover doesn’t so much as hint at that.

 

This edition, published in June 2018 by Head of Zeus, is a different colourway of the main design. I am not sure that I like the blue as much as the warmer, more doglike terracotta tones.

 

Published by Planeta9 in 2020, this Czech edition is more representative of Rex than any of the previous offerings. But once again, that red stripe in the backdrop and the muted tone of the colours projects horror, rather than the military science fiction adventure that morphs into the consequences of taking this step which accurately reflects what this book is about. And Rex looks like a ravening monster, which the book goes to some lengths to demonstrate that he isn’t anything of the sort. Because if he was, then there would be no moral tussle about destroying him and the rest of his kind.

 

This Russian edition, published in October 2018 by Эксмо: fanzon, is my favourite by a long country mile. The photo shows Rex and his team far more accurately than any of the other covers – and the design manages to also look vibrant and visually pleasing, as well as reflecting the tone and actual genre. Though it’s a shame a bit more thought didn’t go into the title and author fonts. Which is your favourite?







Friday Faceoff – Confidence is an armour you cannot buy… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffarmourcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with ARMOUR. I’ve selected The Fell Sword – Book 2 of the Traitor Son Cycle by Miles Cameron, see my review.


This offering was produced by Gollancz in June 2014. It’s stripped right back in a really interesting way – no castle or mountain in the background to distract, just that beautifully etched design. Which means all our attention is on the armoured knight fighting for his life against a terrifying monster with too much beak and claws. Look at the fabulous feathers that pick up the colour in the title font… There are some lovely details in this one, including that slightly uneven border, which shows  the thought that has gone into this one. As a result, it is really eye-catching. I also like the font, which manages to evoke the genre and historical period, without becoming impossible to read. Altogether, it’s a classy effort and my favourite.

 

Published in March 2014 by Orbi, this cover is almost the complete opposite of the previous one in approach. Instead of zooming out to show us the whole battle, we get a real close-up – to the extent that we can see the dents in the armour. We’ve no idea what this knight is fighting – indeed, we don’t even get to see the whole figure. That is left to our imagination. I really like it, too. And I especially approve of the treatment given to the title and author fonts, limned in electric blue lightning, as if struck by magic. It’s nicely done and brightens up what could have been a rather dark cover.


This French edition, published in August 2014 by Bragelonne, is another classy design. It has taken the same approach as the Orbit designers, going for the close-up – this time we get a shot of the knight’s helm carried in his arm – note the blood spatter… The same electric blue lighting is used, this time as a backdrop to the main figure, rather than to highlight the title and author fonts. While I like the treatment, particularly of the title, my one niggle is that it is too small for the scale of the cover.

 

This German edition, published in September 2014 by Heyne has grown on me. Initially, I thought it rather underwhelming in comparison with the previous offerings – but the more I see of it, the more I like it. The blue colouring, more intense towards the edges and fading to a brighter shade in the middle is both attractive and effective at drawing our eyes to the centre of the cover, where the etched outline of a heraldic device is traced, with a dragon helm right in the middle of it. And the slight smudging of the author name and title is really effective.

 

This Russian edition, published by Фантастика Книжный Клуб in October 2019, is in effect, the Gollancz cover flipped around, so we see more of the back of the creature as he faces down the knight. For some reason best known to himself, this chap sees fit to fight without his helm on, and wearing a cloak. He clearly hasn’t read the memo about how lethal cloaks can be in combat – and what happens if a claw gets pass your defence and rakes your face. While I do like it, I’m not quite as keen on it as I am the first cover, due to the daft decisions by the knight. Which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – When Life gets blurry, adjust your focus… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffdoublevisioncovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring DOUBLE VISION covers. I’ve selected Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, which I really enjoyed – see my review.

 

This offering was produced by Crown in July 2016. It’s actually a really simple cover. Just the title in black, against a red background and then parts of the top and bottom of the title font copied in diminishing sizes. But isn’t it effective? So very clever and eye-catching! It just goes to show that some of the best designs are those with the simplest dynamic. And yay for a complete lack of clutter – other than the title and the author’s name, there is NOTHING ELSE on the cover. This is my favourite.

 

Published in May 2017 by Ballantine, this is the reverse of the previous effort. Except they have also added a repeating pattern of the protagonist across the background, which I think looks really effective, adding an extra dimension to the design. In thumbnail, I’d decided that this one was my favourite – until I’d enlarged it to discover they’d decided to add some chatter top and bottom, which I think compromises the visual impact of the whole design. What a shame! Otherwise, it would have been my favourite.

 

This edition, published in August 2016 by Pan, is another awesome design. It’s funny how some authors are lucky enough to have several wonderful book designs. If you have read the book, you’ll know that that this design is especially appropriate, as well as visually beautiful. It is a real contender for me – I was so very tempted to make this one my favourite, especially as I love the spiralling effect down to into the centre of the cover.

 

This edition, published in August 2016 by Macmillan is… interesting. I envisage the conversation between the cover designer and publisher going something like this –
“What – you want me to do a redesign? But it’s awesome!”
“We want our own branding. Though if you can reference the original cover regarding colours…”
“So red and black, then.”
“Yes.”
“Can I mix it up – add a couple more colours? Bring in another concept?”
“Nope. Just rebrand it with a fresh twist. Using the same colours and with a nod to the original design.”
“Okay.”
And this is what they ended up with…

 

This Finnish edition, published by Tammi in January 2017, is another strong offering. I really like the orange and black, which also works well. The two figures are effective, with orange in profile and the other fractured version facing us. Again, a pleasing nod to the story – and again – I’m delighted at the lack of chatter on the cover, which gives us a chance to appreciate the full impact of the design. But which is your favourite?


Friday Faceoff – Tricks and treachery are the practice of fools… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceofftrickcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with VISUAL TRICKERY. I’ve selected The Whisper Man by Alex North.


This edition was produced by Celadon Books in August 2019. It’s it clever? The handprint that somehow turns into a butterfly works really well. And they haven’t even added a bit of colour to give us a visual clue, which would have been acceptable. I love the fact that ALL the information featured on the cover is the title, the author and the fact that this is a novel. For once the publishers have relied on the strength of the book design to sell this one – and judging by the numbers of reviews it garnered on Goodreads, this default cover did the business.

 

Published in June 2019 by Penguin, I think this is both beautiful and gruesome – and those aren’t two adjectives that go together all that often… The beautiful butterfly wing in the pale gold against the dark background is stunning – until you look a bit more closely and notice the details are skulls and parts of the human skeleton. The pin through the wing just adds to the sense of wrongness. But it is subtle and clever. This one is my favourite.

 

This Polish edition, published by MUZA S.A., in October 2019 is another cover that plays visual tricks. The white moth against the black cover couldn’t be more simple – until you look again and see it as a triangular, ghostly face. I also like the title font – the greying, slightly grubby look works really well with the monochrome effect of the rest of the cover and I applaud the designer in keeping it pared back. So many covers these days are so very busy. My only niggle – and yes, you’ll probably already know what I’m going to say, but I’ll say it anyway – are the lines of chatter under the melting moth/face. What a shame they had to be there, as they detract from the spare menace of the design.

 

This Bulgarian edition, produced by Сиела in 2019, has taken the butterfly – or is it moth? – theme in a different direction. There is a lot going on in this beautiful, ominous cover. The full moon outside provides all the light as a lightning forks across the sky and those moths flutter around the window. Nothing much to see – except the curtain has been drawn back and there is a single palmprint on the glass. If the owner of the hand pressed against the window was standing in front of it, s/he/it had to be outside… It’s cleverly done and gives a disturbing sense of wrongness without recourse to any kind of horror trope.

 

This Macedonian edition, published by Сакам Книги is less subtle, but I absolutely love the jagged cut across the title font which works so well. I’m not quite as thrilled with the spatter of blood, but that butterfly… Is it resting on the chin of a face, just below a screaming mouth? Or is that just my imagination working overtime? The indistinctness adds to the horror vibe. If I have a quibble, I think the abandoned house beneath the title font is an unnecessary addition – they should have trusted the strength of that single, shocking image, rather than hedging their bets with another horror trope. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – Off the leash… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceofffreebiecovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring FREEBIE covers. I’ve selected Circe by Madeline Miller, which I absolutely loved. And I also love every one of these covers…

This edition was produced by Boomsbury Publishing UK in April 2018. Isn’t it gorgeous? I love the warm colours that reference the Greek art on ancient pottery and the beautiful title font running from top to bottom of the urn, giving it a strikingly different look. And those flowers with the shading and beautiful detail… I think this is one of my all-time favourite covers and it was this design that prompted me to buy this one. I’m so glad I did…

 

Published in April 2018 by Little, Brown and Company, this is also a wonderfully striking effort. That Grecian face staring out at us, both imperious and slightly sad, draws our gaze. Once again, the warm orange and black colour scheme is both attractive and references Greek artefacts, as does the border detailing. I also like the title font, which works well. However, I do think it’s a shame to clutter this lovely design with unnecessary chatter, compromising the look and feel of the cover.

 

This edition, published by Bloomsbury Publishing in April 2019, is another wonderful design, given it’s a pared-down, less luscious version of the first cover. Once again, the colour scheme just sings out – and I love the Grecian urn with that lovely raised title font. It would look even more stunning if we didn’t, have that wonderful jar-shaped space stuffed with a load of pointless chatter, which despoils this cover more than any of the others, I think. I also love the background, directly referencing some of the ancient Greek figures depicted on artefacts.

 

This edition, produced by Pocket in May 2019, is another fabulous effort. A wonderful, subtle design that has stolen my heart. And NO annoying chatter to compromise and detract from the intended visual impact – and doesn’t it just look so much better for it? Not that I’m ranting. At all. Nope. This was so very nearly my favourite…


This French edition, published by Rue Fromentin in May 2018, is a bit different from the rest – for starters, it has broken away from the orange and black colour scheme. I love the soft-focus figure offering up a charger, presumably to a god. Though I’m guessing it wouldn’t be Zeus… It’s a beautiful image, the shape of the woman and colouring working well in making this a cover full of mystery. So this is my freebie selection – which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – And all addictions were brown. Coffee, chocolate and his eyes… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffbrowncovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring BROWN covers. I’ve selected The Naturalist series by Andrew Mayne. I haven’t yet read any of the books, though the first one is on my TBR…

 

The Naturalist was published by Thomas & Mercer in October 2017. It’s rare I want to reach out and STROKE a cover, but that is exactly what I want to do with this one. I also very much like that the font is given sufficient attention. It might be relatively white and plain – but just look at the way it pops against that rich brown. I get the sense the colour choice is deliberate rather than because nobody could be bothered to consider anything else. I love the way the title and author fonts appear to be sinking into that luxuriant coat. This is so nearly my favourite…

 

Published in March 2018 by Thomas & Mercer, they’ve nailed the cover of this second book in the series, too. It is apparently such a simple design, but I cannot take my eyes off it. The richness of the fallen leaves half covering bones… the fact we cannot quite make out exactly what they are is tantalising, adding to the sense of mystery. And again, the title and author fonts have been masterfully handled. I love the clean uncluttered look of this classy offering. This is how covers should look, people! Not that I’m ranting. At all. And in case you hadn’t already guessed – this one is my favourite.

 

Murder Theory, the third book in The Naturalist series, was published in February 2019 by Thomas & Mercer and once again, features an eye-catching natural scene that mesmerises. The fractured wood with the spatters of blood flicking across the title and author fonts is so very clever and telling. And no chatter or blurb to detract from the power of that design. Another lovely, well crafted cover that makes me want to pick this one up…

 

Thomas & Mercer published Dark Pattern in October 2019 – clearly going for a quick-release strategy to keep readers keen to continue to follow the story. It doesn’t hurt that they also have produced stormingly good covers to help with the marketing. I love that stick, which also looks a bit like a snake with an open mouth. The way the fern encroaches on the font adds to the pleasing detail. I really love all these covers – and just wish that more books had the same classy look. Thomas & Mercer rock! Which is your favourite?






Friday Faceoff – Love, the exotic bird, came and went… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffexoticcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring EXOTIC covers. I’ve selected WWW: Wake – Book 1 of the WWW series by Robert Sawyer – see my review.


This edition was produced by Ace Hardcover in April 2009. It’s a gorgeous cover, so pretty and unusual. As is often the case with particularly effective designs, it’s become the default cover for the book and quite right, too. Being the nitpicky misery that I am, I’m still huffing in exasperation at those nasty little textboxes that truncate this lovely effort. Why not do away them altogether? I also think the title font deserves more attention – it could have been far more exciting, against such an amazing backdrop. However, this one is certainly my favourite.

 

Published in June 2011 under the publishing imprint Urania by Mondadori, this Italian edition is one of the exceptions that hasn’t used the above cover. While I like the image, which I think is arresting and rather beautiful – I can’t work out why it is limited to that measly little circle, leaving an uninspiring expanse of white cover. Clearly, Urania has a number of devoted fans, otherwise I can’t think of any other reason why the publishing imprint would feature more prominently than the title or author.

 

This audio edition, published by Brilliance Audio in March 2010, is another, more successful, departure from the default cover. To be honest, this was so very nearly my favourite. For starters, the treatment of the author and title fonts work so much better. And once again, I love the colours and patterning – it is beautiful. But I really lost my heart to the first design…

 

This French edition, produced by Robert Laffont in February 2010, is taking a more monochrome approach to the personification of the internet. That said, it is a clever design as the more you look at it, the more you see. However, again, I think the title and author fonts have been badly handled. Why use black lettering against a backdrop of grey? Surely a bright red or glowing yellow embossed font would nicely pop, drawing the attention of potential readers?

 

This Chinese edition, published by 貓頭鷹出版 in December 2012 has another attractive design. Though I think it is spoilt by that ugly black textbox with all the chatter cluttering up the cover – given that the title is already incorporated within the artwork, it seems entirely unnecessary. Which is your favourite?

Friday Faceoff – One thing about skeletons – they’ll always give you a smile… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffskeletoncovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with SKELETONS. I’ve selected the science fiction classic Skeleton Crew by Stephen King, which I haven’t read.


This edition was produced in June 2007 by Berkley. I really dislike this cover. Those heaped skulls drenched in red could be effective – but for the fact they are squeezed between two charmless text boxes. The green effort at the bottom of the cover for the title font is particularly grotty – it doesn’t match or tone with anything at all and the font style has virtually no visual impact.

 

Published in November 1986 by Futura, this one is my favourite. I think the image is far more coherent than the previous effort. The skeleton is looking out at the reader and directly engaging with us. The author font is particularly attractive, I love the embossing on it – and in Stephen King’s case, it makes marketing sense to feature his name, rather than the title. While it might be less snazzy than the title, I do like the way the scythe is positioned in front of the lettering on the title font.

This Polish edition, published by Proszynski i S-ka in 2000, is another reasonable design. I rather like the misty effect, giving a slightly more creepy vibe which is important in a horror book. I have two niggles with this effort, however – I think the backdrop is too dark, which doesn’t allow those skeletons to sufficiently pop. And the title and author fonts are once again, drearily plain.

 

This Czech edition, produced by Beta Dobrovský in 2014, is a departure from the skeletons, instead featuring a rather dramatic sea monster. Given that this is a fairly basic design, I think it is effective with the detailed tentacle and the splash of blood. The author font is especially good, echoing the design of my favourite and while the title font is a lot less attractive and eye-catching, it does at least look as if some thought has gone into it.

 

This edition, produced by Scribner in January 2016, is a complete departure from the horrible skeletons or sea monsters – the creepy absence of anyone on a deserted pier, just the empty seat. I really like this one – the warmth of the lighting and misty effect that reflects off the wet wooden boards gives a sense of wrongness. It is a lot more subtle than the other covers and would have been my favourite, but for the woefully underwhelming author and title fonts. Why would you simply not bother to make the title and author information look attractive, after to the trouble of producing such an effective image? Which one do you like best?

Friday Faceoff – With this ring… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffringcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with RINGS. I’ve selected the science fiction classic Ringworld by Larry Niven, which I read a very long time ago.

 

This edition was produced in September 1985 and all I can discover is that it is a mass market paperback and a US publication. It’s a very understated, rather gloomy affair, I think. While I think the Ringworld itself looks rather lovely, I think a beautiful nebula in the background would give the cover more visual impact. As for the title and author font – they are very clear, if rather boring.

 

Published in January 1988 by Orbit, this is a far better effort. The Ringworld is easier to see and the spacescape is more interesting. There’s just one major problem… and perhaps I’m being really thick here – but I can’t see a title. Is it just me? Or have Orbit actually forgotten to add the name of the book to this cover? Perhaps they figure everyone ought to know what this legendary best-seller is called.

 

This paperback edition, published by Del Rey in April 1988, gives a different view of the Ring. We’re near the centre looking outward at the struts. This is certainly the best effort so far. I also like the effort to make the title font more interesting and the overall effect is an attractive, eye-catching cover that gives a good sense of the genre.

 

This Polish edition, produced by Solaris in June 2010, is my favourite. I love the more dramatic rendition of an earlier Ringworld – that centre really pops. While the spacescape in the backdrop looks beautiful with two moons and the hint of spaceship… maybe. And I also like the attractive title and author fonts.

 

This ghastly effort is courtesy of Gollancz in April 2009. They went through a really dodgey phase regarding covers around that time, as I recall them bringing out a series of utterly dreary Discworld books. But this one has to take the biscuit for sheer awfulness. What WERE they thinking?? Hallo – the title of the book is Ringworld and it’s all about a world shaped like a ring. So why is there a paper STAR featured against a black background? I wouldn’t know this is a science fiction classic set in space by looking at the cover, in fact I’d probably assume it’s about origami. Apologies if it’s your favourite – but I needed to get that rant off my chest! Which one do you like best?

Friday Faceoff – Don’t dress to kill, dress to survive… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffbigdressescovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with BIG DRESSES. I’ve selected These Broken Stars – Book 1 of the Starbound series by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner.

 

This edition was produced by Disney Hyperion in December 2013. It’s a gorgeous cover and has become, quite rightly in my opinion, the default cover for this book. That dress is just beautiful – the colour sublime and wonderfully sets off her titian hair. I love the richness and sheer volume of those skirts and the way her hair also moves as she stretches up to him. And there are stars… *sighs with pleasure*. The problem with this cover is that the title font just disappears, being far too slight to prevail against the action and colour of the cover.

 

Published in May 2016 by Carlsen, this German cover is not a bad effort. The two faces both looking out at us are eye-catching and again, the starscape appearing through the main image is effective and gives us a real clue as to the genre. However, while I like the attractive style of the font – it’s the wrong colour, being far too close to the skin tones of the faces behind it, so it essentially disappears when in thumbnail.

 

This Portuguese edition, published by Editora Planeta in December 2015, is featuring the romance far more heavily, while also giving us a taste of the alien planet below. Split image covers like this can work as long as the divide is effective, which I think it is in this case. I think while the font works for a romance, it isn’t so successful if you take into account the sci fi element. However, the problem for me is that the kissing couple is not something that would induce me to pick up the book.

 

This French edition, produced by La Martinière Jeunesse in December 2013, is more heavily leaning towards the sci fi element – you won’t be surprised to learn that this was a very close contender for me. I like the tension evident on the protagonists’ faces and the punchy font, as well as the clearly alien nature of the landscape featured across the top half of this cover.

 

This paperback edition, published by Allen & Unwin in December 2013 is my favourite. It is essentially the top cover, with all the lushness and loveliness AND you can read the book’s name, which has to be a bonus😊. Which is your favourite?