Category Archives: book covers

Friday Faceoff – The devil is in the detail… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffdetailedcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with lots of DETAIL. I’ve selected Just One Damned Thing After Another – Book 1 of the Chronicles of St Mary’s by Jodie Taylor, see my review.

Night Shade, 2016

This offering was produced by Night Shade in June 2016 and is one of the default covers for this quirky book. It certainly features some of the elements that pack the book, though my grizzle with it is that you don’t have a clue about the madcap humour running through the book by looking at this design. Though I really like the treatment of the font – I just wish the lower half of the cover wasn’t such a dreary brown, which makes it look far too dark and forbidding.

Accent Press, September 2013

Published in September 2013 by Accent Press, this is the other default cover and the one that immediately sprang to mind when I thought of this week’s them. I know that it doesn’t look all that detailed initially, but if you look closely through the steam of that inviting cuppa, you’ll see glimpses of some of the time travel projects the St Mary’s team embark on. I love the bright colour that gives an indication of the comedy that runs through this book. Taylor is the only one of a handful of authors who I can rely on to make me both laugh and weep when reading her books. In case you didn’t already realise, this is my favourite.

Accent Press, November 2013

This edition, published in November 2013 by Accent Press is another strong contender, even though I don’t like it quite as much as the previous design. The border in this instance works well. While the design is pared right back, there is still a lot going on in this cover, though it isn’t as busy as the previous offering. It is all held together by the clever use of the black and red shading, making it eye-catching and elegant.

Accent Press, November 2013

This Kindle edition, published in November 2013 by Accent Press is another eye-catching effort. Using a blurry version of the teacup, the illustrations in the top half of the cover are more apparent in thumbnail – someone actually thought about how this one was going to look at a smaller scale, which is refreshing. And indeed, the design is far easier to decipher and stands out well. However, my preference is still for the second cover, though I think it comes down to the fact that I’ll always go for brighter colours, given a choice.

Italian edition, February 2020

This Italian edition, published by Corbaccio in February 2020, has gone for a more pared back effect, with the designer using an art deco feel, clearly trying to evoke a classic British style, as there is something manically Brit about the way St Mary’s is run. But this version is far too elegant and crisply up together. For instance, Max is far more likely to be found wearing a boiler suit, than a smart skirt. And again, the subdued shades of garnet don’t give an indication of the sheer fun of this engaging series. Which is your favourite?


Cover Love – 5 #Brainfluffcoverlove #CoverlovePhilWilliams

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Welcome to another helping of Cover Love. This week I’m displaying Phil Williams’ covers in honour of his recent release of Kept From Cages, which I loved. I discovered his quirky Ordshaw trilogy last year – see my reviews of Under Ordshaw, Blue Angel and The Violent Fae. He also designed the covers for all the books in the series, as well as the new Ikiri series, which I find very impressive. Which ones do you particularly like?

Friday Faceoff – Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffminimalistcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring MINIMALIST covers. I’ve selected The Hound of the Baskervilles – Book 5 of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries by Arthur Conan Doyle.

Enhanced Classics, 2014

So who knew that such a classic would be a source of such minimalist covers? But this edition, released in September 2014 by Enhanced Classics is one of a number of pared back designs that trades on our abiding affection and knowledge of this quirky detective. I really like it – though I do wonder if the dog ought to feature on the cover, given the way the fear of the beast looms throughout this tense murder mystery.

Vintage Classics, 2008

Published in September 2008 by Vintage Classics, this is another simple design. Despite the apparent simplicity, there’s quite a lot going on here. I like the graduated colour fading to black at the outer edges, which essentially puts that magnifying glass and the title in the spotlight. It’s a clever move having the snarling muzzle of the dog within the magnifying glass. The cover projects tension and menace without a splash of blood, or any garish visual tricks regarding the title. My one grumble is that I think the title could do with being less Victorian and self-effacing.

Portuguese edition 2013

This Portuguese edition, published in 2013 by Zahar, is a real gem. Again, it has used the ubiquitous silhouette of Holmes to produce the heart of the design, before adding another layer that absolutely nails this one for me. Within the shadowed outline of Holmes is the ruined house where a certain character hid, thus thoroughly throwing dear old Watson right off the scent of the real villain. And then we have the cemetery and the dog, himself… I also absolutely love the way the smoke curls up from the pipe to give us the name of the author. This is my favourite.

Marathi edition, 2012

And this Marathi edition is another example of a simple outline featuring on the cover. Published in January 2012 by Diamond Publications, the almost cartoonish creature on the trail of his prey immediately draws the eye. Again, the background is effectively shaded, pulling our attention onto the snarling beast in the centre of the cover – while that hill than provides the text box for the title and author fonts. This one was so nearly my favourite – it was the wisping smoke turning into Conan Doyle’s name on the other other contender that edged for me.

Lithuanian edition, 2013

This Lithuanian edition, published in May 2013 by Baltos Iankos, is another effective and simple cover. The shaded background allows the black outline of the dog to stand out, so although he is running more or less towards us – a difficult angle when most of the details aren’t apparent – we can make him out with no difficulty. I like the fact the designer has taken the trouble to give him a shadow, thus anchoring him to the background, instead of just plonking him onto the top of it. I do think the title font could be a bit larger and punchier, but that is a personal preference. Which is your favourite?


Cover Love – 4 #Brainfluffcoverlove #CoverloveJanetEdwards

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Welcome to another helping of Cover Love. This week I’m displaying Janet Edward’s covers in honour of her recent release of Earth Prime, which I loved. Her books have been helping me escape to wonderful places full of adventure and hope for years now – see my reviews of Earth Girl, Earth Star, Earth Flight, Earth and Air, Frontier, which are all books set in her Earth Girl series, as well as Telepath, Defender, Hurricane and Borderline in the Hive Mind series, and Scavenger Alliance and Scavenger Blood in the Scavenger Exodus series, which is a spinoff prequel series set in the Earth Girl world. Which ones do you particularly like?


Friday Faceoff – When snow falls, Nature listens… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffsnowcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers depicting SNOW. I’ve selected Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson.

Bloomsbury, 2009

This offering, produced by Bloomsbury in 2009, is a strong image and was the reason why I chose this book. However the sense of chilly isolation is spoilt by all the chatter cluttering up the cover – and for once, I’m not a fan of the large author and title fonts as I think they overwhelm the image.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 1994

Published in September 1994 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, this is the default cover for the book, which is a real shame. The cedar forest on the side of the cliff is certainly atmospheric and it would be ideal with the title was MIST OVER CEDARS – but it’s not. The title mentions snow – and there isn’t any. Oops. But that didn’t stop a raft of other publishers adopting this cover, anyway. Worse, the title and author fonts are so small and underwhelming, so they disappear in thumbnail and aren’t all that visible when full size.

Portuguese edition, February 1998

This Portuguese edition, published in February 1998 by Relógio D’ Água, has taken a different path with a painting. It looks lovely, but I’m not a fan of the border that grows into a textbox across the top of the cover, though at least the title and author name are clearly visible.

German edition, February 2013

This German edition, published in February 2013 by Hoffmann und Campe and is clearly influenced by the default cover above, in that it is a close-up of cedar branches in the mist. At least the title and author fonts are more effective in this cover design and work well within the image, in addition to being clearly visible in thumbnail, as well as when full sized.

French edition, 1996

This French edition, published in 1996 by France loisirs, at least features snow falling – a sleeting blizzard that makes me shiver just looking at it. I’ll forgive the lack of cedars to have some snow – and a suggestion of a river in full spate with snow-shrouded branches growing over it. Though whatever they are, they’re not evergreen cedars. I think this cover is the most successful in capturing the mood of the book, as well as evoking the title. Which is your favourite?


Cover Love – 3 #Brainfluffcoverlove #CoverloveJulietEMcKenna

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Welcome to another helping of Cover Love. This week I’m displaying Juliet E McKenna’s covers in honour of her recent release of The Green Man’s Silence, which of course I snapped up. I have enjoyed reading her books for a while now – see my reviews of The Green Man’s Heir, The Green Man’s Foe, Dangerous Waters, Darkening Skies, Irons in the Fire, Blood in the Water and Banners in the Wind. I also have read the awesome Aldabreshin Compass series, which absolutely rocks and the highly enjoyable The Tales of Einarinn series. Which ones do you particularly like?


Friday Faceoff – Straight roads do not make skilful drivers… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffroadcovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers with a ROAD on them. I struggled a bit this week, but in the I’ve selected The Crow Trap – Book 1 of the Vera Stanhope series by Anne Cleeves.

Pan MacMillan – October 2001

This edition was produced by Pan MacMillan in October 2001. It’s very plain – just black lettering on a red background, with a single feather. I wish they’d left it at that and had resisted the temptation to add the chatter, because with such a minimalist approach, any extra fluff really jars, as in this case. The lettering is slightly fuzzed, which I really like, because it forces me to refocus on it, pulling at my attention for a second look. If it hadn’t been for the extra line of chat, this would have been a real contender.

Minotaur Books – February 2017

Published in February 2017 by Minotaur Books, this cover is another strong contender. I just wish they’d left off the ugly button featuring Brenda Blethyn, who plays Vera in the very strong TV series. But I love the outline of the crow against the plain purple cover, showing a deserted barn in the desolate countryside, which is part of Vera’s patch. Overall, I think this is another strong, effective design that works well, with plenty of visual appeal.

Pan – April 2016

This edition, published by Pan in April 2016, is the first to feature a landscape. And what a dark, brooding landscape! It’s this cover that caused me to choose the book for this week’s theme and I have to say that I love it. The wild moorland, the rutted road and that gorgeously ominous sky. This would be my favourite, but for my concern that the feel and tenor of the cover is more suited to a horror thriller, rather than a rather downbeat police procedural murder mystery. And that ghastly blob, of course.

Pan Publishing – August 2010

This edition, produced by Pan Publishing in August 2010, is even bleaker. That midnight blue suffusing the cover, with the image of the crow dangling from the barbed-wire fencing definitely gives this one a strong horror vibe. The reason why I suppose they feel comfortable using such bleak imagery, is the very clear lettering announcing that this is a Vera Stanhope novel. It’s also significant that by now, the author’s name is larger than the title, which shows the success that she had achieved by then. Although the TV series wasn’t aired until 2011, so this cover was designed before then.

Russian edition – April 2020

This Russian edition, published by Эксмо in April 2020, is another cover featuring the bleak but beautiful Northumberland coastline. The aspect of the cover that particularly caught my attention is the way the title is resting in amongst the grass, seemingly rooted there. It creates an interesting and unusual visual dynamic. This one is my favourite – it gives a sense of menace, without a strong horror vibe. I’d pick this one up, whereas I think I’d probably leave most of the others on the shelf. Which one is your favourite – and have you read the books, or watched the TV series?

Cover Love – 2 #Brainfluffcoverlove #CoverloveNKJemisin

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Welcome to a second helping of Cover Love where I’m displaying N.K. Jemisin’s covers😊. I was inspired by the awesome covers of the Broken Earth trilogy – which is also one of my all-time favourite reads. See my reviews of The Fifth Season, The Obelisk Gate, The Stone Sky, The Killing Moon, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, and The Broken Kingdoms. Which ones do you particularly like?


Friday Faceoff – There is but one genuine love potion – consideration… #Brainfluffbookblog #FridayFaceoffpotioncovers

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and this week we are featuring covers depicting POTIONS. I’ve selected The Potion Diaries – Book 1 of The Potion Diaries series by Amy Alward.

Simon & Schuster – July 2015

This offering was produced by Simon & Schuster in July 2015 and is the default cover. It certainly ticks all the boxes – the title is clear with a quirky font and the whole design is straightforward and gives a strong sense of the genre. But while I think it’s okay – I don’t love it, or even particularly like it. It just doesn’t speak to me.

Hardcover edition – Simon & Schuster – September 2015

Published in September 2015 by Simon & Schuster, this hardback edition – rather unhelpfully – has been renamed. My guess is that it is referring to the film, Truly, Madly, Deeply. As a design, I think it works really well. I love the rich pinks and purples of the potion-effect backdrop, which allows the thin, scratched-out effect of the design and lettering to really pop, even when in thumbnail. While I admire this offering, and think it’s clever and apt – this cover isn’t my favourite, though it comes mightily close.

Nocturna – March 2016

This Spanish edition, published by Nocturna in March 2016, is using the classical idea of potent potions as the main reference. The hand, wreathed in ominous smoke and vivid lightning is dramatic and beautiful – but although the nails are wearing nail varnish, I’m still unsure if the tone of this cover gives a sufficiently modern vibe. That lettering looks far too like something from Arabian nights. That said, I’m aware it’s more of a niggle and this one is a close contender.

Cbj – July 2016

Cbj, the German publishers for this edition in July 2016 decided to go all out for the cute and feminine, hoping it would appeal to their YA readership. Could it be any pinker? Blossoms… a heart-shaped bottle – and just in case anyone didn’t get that it is aimed at a young, female audience, they also threw in some gold sparkles, too. I don’t think anyone told the designers that less is more… That said, it’s very pretty – but I’m guessing from the blurb, the book is a bit more edgy than this Disney-princess treatment might suggest.

Talpress – March 2018

This Czech cover is a far darker take on the story. Published in March 2018 by Talpress, this cover is clearly set in a laboratory. I love the details of other bottles and that tap in the background, while the trapped mermaid glowing in the glass is beautiful and eye-catching. Normally, I’m not a fan of textboxes, but given that this one is so clearly designed as a label to place on a bottle – it gets a pass. This is my favourite – I think it’s attractive, punchy and very well done. Which one do you prefer?


Cover Love – 1 #Brainfluffcoverlove #CoverloveMarieBrennan

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This is a new feature, prompted by Tammy at Books, Bones and Buffy, who featured Kings and Queens in book titles. I love the pretty montage, but decided that instead, I’d feature book covers by authors whose covers I particularly like. So starting this week – welcome to Cover Love where I’m displaying Marie Brennan’s covers😊. And I cannot deny it – what prompted this choice are those fabulous Lady Trent covers. Have you any particular favourites? Let me know…