Review of The Long Covid Self-Help Guide: Practical ways to manage symptoms by the specialists at the Oxford Post-Covid Clinic #BrainfluffLONGCOVIDbookreview #TheLongCovidSelfHelpGuidebookreview

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BLURB: The first practical, accessible self-help guide to managing symptoms of Long Covid

More than 1 million people suffer from Long Covid in the UK (with 400,000 people suffering symptoms for over a year), and many more globally. Yet there is no clear guidance available to the general public, and lots of misinformation out there. This handbook cuts through the confusing advice. Written by the medical experts working with Long Covid patients at one of the first specialist clinics set up, it is filled with helpful case studies and was written with the involvement of real Long Covid sufferers. The focus is on self-management with a simple, consistent message about improving symptoms.

Each chapter takes a different issue in turn and offers clear, friendly guidance on key areas such as breathlessness, psychological aspects, brain fog, fatigue, returning to exercise and returning to work.


REVIEW: I’m one of those 400,000 Brits who have now been battling with Long Covid since I got sick in March 2021. Before I went down with Covid, I enjoyed good health for my age (I’m in my mid-60s) and was active, enjoying two fitness classes a week, and loving my work as a writer and part-time Creative Writing tutor at the local college. My chief current symptoms are tinnitus, nasal drip, difficulty in sleeping, brain fog – though that is improving, swollen thyroid and lymph glands. And the one that concerns me most… fatigue – I had a terrifying relapse back in August that had me bedridden for a fortnight, where I could barely stagger to the toilet and back. And was too mentally exhausted to even care that I was so diminished. It’s taken months to get to a stage where I now feel confident enough to try to move on from spending hours a day either in bed or on the settee, because even now, I haven’t yet made up the ground I’d lost. So when I saw this book, I immediately ordered it.

It does exactly what it says on the tin. It takes us through each of the major symptoms – I feel blessed that I could completely skip the chapter on breathlessness – explaining what is going on and providing a range of tips and exercises on how to overcome, or live more easily with the symptoms described. I found the chapter on fatigue really helpful, as it confirmed my hunch that I’d become under-active and needed to – very gently – step up my daily activity. I am also finding the chapter on Up-pacing invaluable. It’s the first time I’ve encountered this term and provides me with a way to structure an exercise programme to recondition my unfit, bed-softened body while minimising the risk of another major relapse where I’m too shattered to get out of bed.

Overall, I’ve found the book massively helpful. And in amongst the good advice is the constant reminder that every patient is different, with varied experiences and health conditions, so will need to consider their own issues when working through their problems. It’s important and valuable advice to remember.

However, after reading through the book the first time around – I also had a bit of a meltdown when I read of patients leading busy lives who were trying to cope with the daily demands of work, housework and shopping. My initial reaction was one of fury – I bloody well wish! My life, which had been busy and full of going out with friends, is now confined to home. I find visitors exhausting and holding long conversations draining. And I haven’t been able to write creatively – other than book reviews which don’t really count, as far as I’m concerned – since I became bedridden in August. In short – I’ve lost my former life and now lead an existence more fitting for a frail ninety-year-old. And other than having my thyroid scanned regularly to monitor ongoing changes – for which I’m very grateful – I have no other help. I’m on the waiting list for the local Long Covid Clinic, but in the meantime, the days, weeks and months slide by and I have to keep going on my own. So I felt very angry to think that people far less compromised were able to get such help. That said, I’ve calmed down since then and remembered that each of us have our own difficulties. At least I’m not in chronic pain, or battling with breathlessness as so many Long Covid sufferers are.

Highly recommended for those suffering with Long Covid, or know someone close who is coping with this difficult chronic condition.
10/10

6 responses »

    • Thank you, Anne. It’s been an ongoing worry to find a way of getting fitter that doesn’t trigger another relapse. But now I think I’ve found a way through…

  1. This book sounds very helpful, not only because of the explanations about symptoms and the tips for improvement, but mostly because it shows individuals that they are not alone in their current troubles. And that there is always room for improvement, even if it takes some time…

    • Yes! I did KNOW that I wasn’t alone – but yet, I haven’t met anyone else in my situation. That’s not surprising as I don’t go out all that much – and neither does anyone else with my type of symptoms. So reading notes from other patients was helpful and encouraging.

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