Review of AUDIOBOOK Truckers – Book 1 of the Bromeliad trilogy by Terry Pratchett and and narrated by Stephen Briggs #Brainfluffaudiobookreview #Truckersaudiobookreview

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I read a print version of this book longer ago than I care to think, so when I encountered the audiobook edition that I’d bought for my granddaughter three years ago, I tucked in…

“Outside! What’s it like?” Masklin looked blank. “Well,” he said. “It’s sort of big.”

To the thousands of tiny nomes who live under the floorboards of a large department store, there is no outside. Things like day and night, sun and rain are just daft old legends. Then a devastating piece of news shatters their existence and it’s up to Masklin, one of the last nomes to come into the Store, to mastermind an unbelievable escape plan that will – somehow – ensure the nomes’ safety…

I have taken liberties with this very chatty blurb – because once again, it revealed far too many plotpoints. But it does feature the main protagonist, Masklin, who struggles to keep his small group fed and I fell in love with him all over again. Pratchett, at his best, specialises in struggling protagonists who are filled with self-doubt, although it’s apparent to the reader and most other characters that they are someone rather special – and so it is with Masklin. He has a wonderful supporting cast, including Torlin, who is in charge of The Thing; Grimma – the harassed female equivalent of Masklin, maybe more so as she spends her time cooking and cleaning for the old folks – including Granny Morky…

As well as the enjoyable relationships between the nomes and Masklin’s delightfully sharp-edged commentary about the people and places they encounter – we also have an ongoing insight into what the nomes have recorded in the Book of Nome. Without being remotely preachy, Pratchett explores prejudice, the way myths, culture and lore accretes over long periods of time – and I’ll be honest, I’ll be mightily impressed if the children who read and enjoy this story actually register and absorb this aspect of Pratchett’s writing. However, it’s a delightful bonus for the adults who encounter this gem – and like all Pratchett’s writing, I loved it. I particularly appreciate the way this fantasy story morphs into a science fiction adventure along the way.

Stephen Briggs’ masterly narration pulled me into the story and I found the utterances from the Book of Nome hilarious in a way that I don’t recall them being that funny as I read the print edition. All in all, this was a real treat and has only confirmed my ongoing love affair with audiobooks, which make all the boring household chores far more palatable. Highly recommended for fans of quirky adventure stories with a difference.
9/10

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14 responses »

    • No, it was a completely different experience. There are passages from the Book of Nome – their holy book – which I had a tendency to skim when reading it to myself. I had thought bits were amusing, but listening to it made me appreciate just how pointed Pratchett’s humour was.

      • Makes sense , I often skip things like poems and songs and literature from mythic text etc

      • I know… It’s a very bad habit I slipped into as a youngster – I’m improving but I do have to confess that I regularly ignore such things, too…

  1. Say, you think I should try reading the Discworld novels to my kiddos? Bo’s going to try reading some of Doyle’s Lost Tales with Blondie, and I’d like to have a fun counterbalance to that.

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