Friday Faceoff – She sells seashells on the sea shore… Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is SEA CREATURES, so I’ve selected a book I read back in the dim and distant past – The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher.

 

This edition was produced by Gramercy Books in April 2004. It is really attractive with the deep blue background fading into a lovely warm orange, giving us a suggestion of the beach. The trumpet whelk in the foreground completes the design – but I can’t help thinking it would have been better off with something like a crimson queen scallop shell to provide more of a visual contrast. The lettering is too large and boring, I feel.

 

Published in May 2015 by St Martin’s Griffin, I really like this one. Initially I was rather underwhelmed by the plain white cover, but the drawing of the scallop and top-shell along with the attractive lettering designed to complement and match the artwork has won me over. It may be simple, but it certainly draws the eye. It was so nearly my favourite…

 

Apparently, this ebook edition has been published, although Goodreads has gone all mysterious as to when and by who. But that’s a daft reason not to feature one of the better covers for the book, I decided. I love the warm colour of the golden sand, scattered with shells. I also very much like the italicised title font that works particularly well with the cover design.

 

Produced in 2003, this Portuguese edition features fish instead of shells. I love the attractive pattern these little fish make – what a shame there’s a thumping big text box plonked in the middle of it! Though at least someone has taken some trouble to give it a nifty border and a suitable colour.

 

This Italian edition, published by Mondadori in October 1996, is back to featuring shells – and what a lovely selection. I really like the way they have been placed against a sea-blue background and the design is completed by sumptuous gold lettering. Again, it’s been very cleverly handled – catching the light in a gleaming yellow for the author name and shadowed to give a darker shade with the italicised title. And although there is a blob AND far too much chatter scattered across the top of the design, this one is my favourite. What about you – which one do you prefer?

36 responses »

    • Thank you, Tammy:). I don’t recall a lot about the book – except for the fact that I enjoyed it, but I do wonder if I should reread it, given that I’m now more of an age of the protagonist… And yes – they are both attractive covers, aren’t they?

  1. I like the old 1996 version best, but I didn’t see the beautiful cover of the US paperback copy, probably from before 1996. It was pinkish and had pink and coral seashells and was really gorgeous. I remember that the author’s name was pretty prominent, for we were “all” reading her back then . I think I read at least five or six of her novels. I also sometimes purchased her paperbacks at the Swap ‘n Shop, a nearby used book store in a town about fifteen minutes from Alvin.

    • Ah… I didn’t see that one, Rae! But there are a fair number of covers and I probably didn’t go back far enough… Glad that the inclusion of this book brought back some happy reading memories:)

      • Yes – I feel the same way! Holidays are often recalled in conjunction with the books I was reading then – which is why I try to store up books I think I’ll particularly like to read when away:))

    • Yes – I recall that I also loved this one back when I first read it, Katherine:)). I can imagine the simple design would make a really good brand image if she is re-releasing her books.

  2. I really like the one you chose Sarah, but I also like the ebook one. I have this book at home on my bookshelf but do not recognize any of these covers. It will be interesting to see what the one I have looks like.

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