Monthly Archives: December 2018

Review of PAPERBACK The Boy on the Bridge – Book 2 of The Girl With All the Gifts series by M.R. Carey – #Brainfluffbookreview #TheBoyontheBridgebookreview

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I was blown away by The Girl With All the Gifts – indeed it was one of my Outstanding Books of 2015. Would I enjoy this one as much?

Once upon a time, in a land blighted by terror, there was a very clever boy. The people thought the boy could save them, so they opened their gates and sent him out into the world. To where the monsters lived.

If you haven’t yet had the pleasure of reading The Girl With All the Gifts and yet you’ve picked this offering up, don’t worry about it. You don’t need to read The Girl With All the Gifts to appreciate The Boy on the Bridge because in reality, the only real connection between them is that they are set in the same world, where a fungal plague has infected humanity, turning the majority of the population into zombies, or hungries, as they are called. The last enclave in the south of England mounts a scientific expedition to retrieve stored specimens that have been cached throughout the length of the country right up into Scotland, using a formidably armoured motorised vehicle – part-tank, part-laboratory – which will take best part of the year. The small elite scientific team is led by Dr Fournier, while the military detail assigned to keep them safe is commanded by Captain Carlisle. These two men loathe and distrust one another and their mutual hostility isn’t helping the success of this vital mission.

The story unfolds in multiple viewpoint, with the two main protagonists being Rina, a young, brilliant scientist who several years ago discovered a traumatised boy and took him under her wing, and Stephen Greaves, now a teenager on the autistic spectrum. One of the reasons why this mission is even possible is due to an invention of Greaves, the e-blocker that stops the hungries being able to smell humans. They are all looking for a mutated strain of the fungal plague which would allow them to find an antidote. This is the story of that mission.

I’ll be honest, I had to take two goes at this book. This genre isn’t my go-to choice if I’m not at my shiny best and right now I’m definitely not at my shiny best. There was a cascade of events that quickly snowballed into something dark and apparently unavoidable, and the very quality of the writing and the harsh reality of Carey’s excellent scene setting only managed to make the whole situation even grimmer. I had toyed with the idea of not finishing this one – not because it wasn’t brilliantly written, but simply because the situation seemed poignantly, desperately sad.

In the event, I’m glad that I got over myself and completed it, because that epilogue was a real jaw-dropper. Whatever I was expecting, it wasn’t that. I didn’t enjoy this one quite as much as The Girl With All the Gifts, chiefly because no one snagged my sympathy in the way that poor little Melanie did. While I very much liked Stephen, there were too many times when I also found his reasoning too alien. I shan’t be forgetting this story, this world and the outcome for a very long time. Carey writes with power and an unflinching ability to dig into our vulnerabilities and make us really think about what it is to be human. Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys apocalyptic adventures.
9/10

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Review of PAPERBACK book Together by Julie Cohen #Brainfluffbookreview #Togetherbookreview

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One of my students kindly lent me this book – thank you, Rose! She thought I might enjoy it as I’d enthused about JoJo Moyes writing…

This is not a great love story. This is a story about great love.
On a morning that seems just like any other, Robbie wakes in his bed, his wife Emily asleep beside him, as always. He rises and dresses, makes his coffee, feeds his dogs, just as he usually does. But then he leaves Emily a letter and does something that will break her heart. As the years go back all the way to 1962, Robbie’s actions become clearer as we discover the story of a couple with a terrible secret – one they will do absolutely anything to protect.

That blurb is a really good summing up of the story – kudos to the publisher for getting it spot on – so many blurbs don’t. The book is told from two viewpoints – Robbie, whose pov features mostly at the beginning of the book, before Emily takes over the narration. So in order for this one to work, I had to really care for both of the main protagonists – and I did. Robbie is in the most horrible dilemma at the start and takes a hard decision without any compromise. But as the book continues, I realised that was how he lived his life – once he decided what was best for him and the ones he loved, he was prepared to go to any lengths to ensure it would happen.

Emily is equally determined to follow her heart. They both pay a very high price for that decision, but as the narrative timeline gradually works backwards throughout the book, I also become aware that they aren’t the only ones who get hurt. Others are also caught up in their unwillingness to live apart.

By the end of the story, I had a lump in my throat and also felt very emotionally torn – because this is essentially a story about a great love between two fundamentally good people who are not prepared to do the right thing and let each other go. Though I was very interested to see there were lines that Cohen wasn’t prepared to cross – the storyline concerning their son was interesting, because in some ways I felt the author slightly ducked the issue surrounding that one.

I’m aware this is a book I’ll remember for a long time… That many people will be shaken at the depiction of two people, whose passion for each other took them places where, perhaps, they shouldn’t have gone. Very highly recommended for fans of Me Before You.
10/10

Review of KINDLE Ebook The High Ground – Book 1 of the Imperials series by Melinda M. Snodgrass #Brainfluffbookreview #TheHighGroundbookreview

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This is one of the books that I tucked into during November for Sci Fi Month – before I realised that I’d run out of days. However, reading and writing a review about an enjoyable, entertaining space opera adventure is never a hardship…

Emperor’s daughter Mercedes is the first woman ever admitted to the High Ground, the elite training academy of the Solar League’s Star Command, and she must graduate if she is to have any hope of taking the throne. Her classmate Tracy has more modest goals — to rise to the rank of captain, and win fame and honor. But a civil war is coming and the political machinations of those who yearn for power threaten the young cadets. In a time of intrigue and alien invasion, they will be tested as they never thought possible.

This book is written from two viewpoints – and is one of the reasons why it works so well. We get an insight into Mercedes’ life and the strains of being the first young woman ever admitted to a male bastion – Solar League’s Star Command – to prepare her for the task of ruling in her father’s stead. And no – this isn’t your classic female heroine panting to knock down the barriers to women having more freedom in society, as Mercedes was perfectly happy with her court life and spending time with her highborn female companions. She is appalled when her father informs her that she will be attending The High Ground.

Her desperate reaction is also mirrored by another reluctant candidate from the other end of the social scale. Her father’s skilled but poor tailor is thrilled when his only son, Tracy, is selected as a scholarship student to attend The High Ground. Tracy isn’t so impressed – he hates the whole rotten system and has no intention of being part of it on any level, until he realises the problems it will cause his father if he walks away.

Snodgrass has been very canny in selecting both these characters as it means we see two lives at both extremes of this rigid, very hierarchical society, both with their own constraints and pressures that oddly, end up being similar even though the causes are quite different.

I’m aware that I’ve given the impression that this is one of those stories all about the social structure with lots of chat, meaningful looks and not much else – it isn’t. In amongst the classes and the difficulties of fitting in, there is plenty of action – and when it all properly kicks off with a life or death event pulling in both main characters and most of their friends and foes, I simply couldn’t put this one down.

I really enjoyed this one and am delighted to find yet another talented female author writing my favourite kind of fiction – I’m definitely going to be tracking down the next book in this series.
9/10

Christmas Quiz 2018 – #BrainfluffChristmasQuiz2018

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When Gran was alive, during our family gatherings we used to play Christmas games. Gran particularly loved general knowledge quizzes, but with 5 generations ranging from the late nineties down to a three year old, it posed something of a challenge. So each year I devised multiple choice questions and everyone played in pairs, which gave even the youngest a chance of answering correctly. Gran is no longer with us, but if you happen to gather in a multi-generational mash-up to celebrate Christmas perhaps this will pass some time between opening presents and tucking into the seasonal feast.

Many thanks for your support and company throughout the year – I hope you have a lovely holiday, whatever your beliefs and whoever you are celebrating with.

1) What was asked for in the Christmas song?
a. Two front teeth                                               c. Three pairs of socks
b. Four DVD’s                                                     d. Five sets of smellies

2) What colour was Rudolf’s nose?
a. Green                                                             c. Mauve
b. Red                                                                d. Black

3) Where does Father Christmas live?
a. The moon                                                     c. Iceland
b. Greenland                                                    d. Lapland

4) How many sides does a snowflake have?
a. Five                                                              c. Eight
b. Six                                                               d. Twelve

5) In the Christmas song, who ‘are getting fat’?
a. Mothers preparing food                            c. Turkeys
b. Reindeer                                                    d. Geese

6) In the song ‘Rudolf the …..nosed reindeer, how is it described? ‘You would even say it…
a. Runs                                                           c. Glows
b. Blows                                                         d. Sneezes

7) In the song ’12 Days of Christmas’ what does my true love give on the fifth day?
a. Lords a leaping                                          c. Swans a swimming
b. Gold rings                                                  d. French hens

8) Where do poinsettias originally come from?
a. Mexico                                                       c. Brazil
b. Peru                                                           d. Venezuela

9) What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?
a. A special knitted scarf                              c. His carrot nose
b. An old top hat                                         d. His coal eyes and stone teeth

10) Who was the composer of The Nutcracker ballet?
a. Handel                                                     c. Bach
b. Tchaikvosky                                             d. Mozart

11) Who was the first English king or queen to have a Christmas tree?
a. King Henry VIII                                        c. Queen Elizabeth I
b. King Charles II                                         d. Queen Victoria

12) In the song ‘We Wish You a Merry Christmas’ what pudding is asked for?
a. Figgy pudding                                        c. Plum pudding
b. Sticky toffee pudding                             d. Rice pudding

13) What was Joseph’s job?
a. Fisherman                                               c. Farmer
b. Carpenter                                               d. Builder

14) Which one of these is NOT one of Father Christmas’s reindeer?
a. Dixen                                                     c. Rudolf
b. Donner                                                  d. Dasher

15) Good King Wenceslas ruled which country?
a. Hungary                                                c. Flanders
b. Czechoslovakia                                     d. Bohemia

16) Where did the real St Nicholas used to live?
a. Lapland                                                 c. Greece
b. Turkey                                                   d. Hungary

17) What did Harry Potter get for Christmas in his first term at Hogwarts?
a. Invisibility cloak                                    c. X-box
b. Book of spells                                       d. An owl

18) What is the name of Tiny Tim’s father in A Christmas Carol?
a. Ben Sackett                                           c. Bob Cratchit
b. Bart Hatchet                                         d. Bill Scratchit

19) What drink was adapted to become the American Christmas drink ‘egg nog’?
a. The Scandinavian drink ‘Glogg’            c. The Austrian drink ‘Gluhwein’
b. The French drink ‘Lait de Poule’           d. The German drink ‘Biersuppe’

20) Who invented the Christmas cracker?
a. George Cracker                                    c. Tom Smith
b. Thomas Edison                                    d. Prince Albert

Christmas Quiz 2018 – Answers
1) What was asked for in the Christmas song?
c. Two front teeth                                     c. Three pairs of socks
d. Four DVD’s                                           d. Five sets of smellies

2) What colour was Rudolf’s nose?
c. Green                                                   c. Mauve
d. Red                                                      d. Black

3) Where does Father Christmas live?
c. The moon                                            c. Iceland
d. Greenland                                           d. Lapland

4) How many sides does a snowflake have?
c. Five                                                     c. Eight
d. Six                                                      d. Twelve

5) In the Christmas song, who ‘are getting fat’?
c. Mothers preparing food                    c. Turkeys
d. Reindeer                                            d. Geese

6) In the song ‘Rudolf the …..nosed reindeer, how is it described? ‘You would even say it…
c. Runs                                                   c. Glows
d. Blows                                                 d. Sneezes

7) In the song ’12 Days of Christmas’ what does my true love give on the fifth day?
c. Lords a leaping                                  c. Swans a swimming
d. Gold rings                                          d. French hens

8) Where do poinsettias originally come from?
c. Mexico                                               c. Brazil
d. Peru                                                   d. Venezuela

9) What brought Frosty the Snowman to life?
c. A special knitted scarf                       c. His carrot nose
d. An old top hat                                  d. His coal eyes and stone teeth

10) Who was the composer of The Nutcracker ballet?
c. Handel                                              c. Bach
d. Tchaikvosky                                      d. Mozart

11) Who was the first English king or queen to have a Christmas tree?
a. King Henry VIII                                 c. Queen Elizabeth I
b. King Charles II                                  d. Queen Victoria

12) In the song ‘We Wish You a Merry Christmas’ what pudding is asked for?
a. Figgy pudding                                 c. Plum pudding
b. Sticky toffee pudding                      d. Rice pudding

13) What was Joseph’s job?
a. Fisherman                                       c. Farmer
b. Carpenter                                       d. Builder

14) Which one of these is NOT one of Father Christmas’s reindeer?
a. Dixen                                               c. Rudolf
b. Donner                                            d. Dasher

15) Good King Wenceslas ruled which country?
a. Hungary                                          c. Flanders
b. Czechoslovakia                               d. Bohemia

16) Where did the real St Nicholas used to live?
a. Lapland                                           c. Greece
b. Turkey                                            d. Hungary

17) What did Harry Potter get for Christmas in his first term at Hogwarts?
a. Invisibility cloak                              c. X-box
b. Book of spells                                 d. An owl

18) What is the name of Tiny Tim’s father in A Christmas Carol?
a. Ben Sackett                                    c. Bob Cratchit
b. Bart Hatchet                                  d. Bill Scratchit

19) What drink was adapted to become the American Christmas drink ‘egg nog’?
a. The Scandinavian drink ‘Glogg’     c. The Austrian drink ‘Gluhwein’
b. The French drink ‘Lait de Poule’    d. The German drink ‘Biersuppe’

20) Who invented the Christmas cracker?
a. George Cracker                             c. Tom Smith
b. Thomas Edison                             d. Prince Albert

Sunday Post – 23rd December, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #SundayPost

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This is part of the weekly meme over at the Caffeinated Reviewer, where book bloggers can share the books and blogs they have written.

It’s been another whirlwind week. I’ve been rushing around like a blue-bottomed fly getting presents wrapped, writing and sending off cards and organising the food for Christmas, which isn’t quite as straightforward as it sounds, given that my son is vegan and we are vegetarian.

On Monday, I travelled to my daughter’s house to deliver the Christmas cards and pressies as I wouldn’t be seeing them over the Christmas break. I had great fun playing with baby Eliza, who is growing at a rate of knots. She fell asleep in my arms and once more I was swept with that painful wave of love which stops the breath in my lungs and makes each heartbeat hurt – a now-familiar sensation since the birth of my first grandchild. They’ll say something, or tilt their head in a particular way – and I’m suffused with that fierce feeling all over again. We went out for lunch together and then I made my way back home when Rebecca had to leave for the school run.

My son arrived on Wednesday and will be staying until after Christmas, which is a great treat, given that I don’t get a chance to see him all that often. Yesterday, I attended a lovely party where we sang seasonal songs around the piano and today, after we did the final supermarket run, we Skyped my mother-in-law, who is celebrating her birthday today. Other than food, I now have all the other Christmas chores completed – yippee!

Last week I read:
A Big Ship at the Edge of the Universe – Book 1 of The Salvagers series by Alex White
Boots Elsworth was a famous treasure hunter in another life, but now she’s washed up. She makes her meager living faking salvage legends and selling them to the highest bidder, but this time she might have stumbled on something real–the story of the Harrow, a famous warship, capable of untold destruction. Nilah Brio is the top driver in the Pan Galactic Racing Federation and the darling of the racing world–until she witnesses the murder of a fellow racer. Framed for the murder and on the hunt to clear her name, Nilah only has one lead: the killer also hunts a woman named Boots.
I really enjoyed this magical, futuristic adventure set in a post-apocalyptic world, recovering after a brutal pan-galactic war. There is plenty of action-packed mayhem, which didn’t prevent me from steadily bonding with the main protagonists.

 

Hurricane – Book 3 of the Hive Mind series by Janet Edwards
Eighteen-year-old Amber is the youngest of the five telepaths who protect the hundred million citizens of one of the great hive cities of twenty-sixth century Earth. Her job is hunting down criminals before they commit their crimes, but this time a simple case leads on to something far bigger. This is a case where Amber’s team have to face the unknown and break all the rules they usually follow, while Amber has extra burdens she can’t share with anyone. She has a personal mystery to solve, and questions she wants answered, but curiosity is a dangerous trait in a telepath.
I’ve enjoyed this series from Edwards – but this is the best book so far. It answers questions about this world that have been niggling since the first one of the series, while the crime investigation provides plenty of tension and action. Review to follow.

 

There Will Be Hell to Pay by Benjamin Gilad
They say those who get deep into the Kabbalah’s mystical text of the celestial spheres can lose their minds. But one man discovers the celestial spheres are far from saintly. The man, Jack Merriman, is a Seer sucked into the celestial realm against his better judgment. He finds out Satan is a beautiful female with a keen sense of justice. Archangel Michael sounds just like James Earl Jones and the Cherubs fill the Celestial spheres with heavenly elevator music. But underneath, the Celestial Spheres are as political and incompetent as a big government agency.
This quirky paranormal investigative story has an interesting premise. I shall be reviewing it in due course.

My posts last week:

Review of Academic Curveball – Book 1 of the Braxton Campus mysteries by James J. Cudney

Teaser Tuesday featuring Hurricane – Book 3 of the Hive Mind series by Janet Edwards

Christmas-Holiday Gifts – Science Fiction and Fantasy for Everyone

Review of The Death Chamber – Book 6 of The Detective’s Daughter series by Lesley Thomson

Friday Face-Off featuring Hogfather – Book 20 of The Discworld series by Terry Pratchett

Review of How To Steal a Dragon’s Sword – Book 9 of the How To Train Your Dragon series by Cressida Cowell

Interesting/outstanding blogs and articles that have caught my attention during the last week, in no particular order:

Friday Face-Off: Seasonal “Ho, Ho, Ho.” https://perfectlytolerable.com/2018/12/21/friday-face-off-seasonal/ This is my favourite meme and Brittany nails it this week by featuring
How The Grinch Stole Christmas – which is your favourite cover?

Echo of Love https://thelonelyauthorblog.com/2018/12/21/echo-of-love/ This time of year is particularly tough on those grieving or lonely – and this beautiful, thoughtful poem reminds us of this…

How The Left Hand of Darkness Changed Everything by Becky Chambers https://lithub.com/how-the-left-hand-of-darkness-changed-everything/ The Lit Hub featured this wonderful article by one of our most talented science fiction authors…

Indian Tea/ Chai Walla(भारतीय चाय, चाई वाल्ला) https://historyofkingpanwars.wordpress.com/2018/12/19/indian-tea-chai-walla This fascinating and detailed article includes videos and a history of growing and drinking tea on the Indian continent.

Things We Say Today Which We Owe to Shakespeare https://blogging807.wordpress.com/2018/12/17/things-we-say-today-which-we-owe-to-shakespeare/ My blogging pal, Rae Longest reblogged this post. It’s a response to all those who claim Shakespeare is no longer relevant to modern life.

In the meantime, many thanks for taking the time to comment, like and visit my blog – have a wonderful holiday, whatever your beliefs and wherever you are…

Review of PAPERBACK How To Steal a Dragon’s Sword – Book 9 of the How To Train A Dragon series by Cressida Cowell #Brainfluffbookreview #HowToStealaDragon’sSword

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I’ve had a bit of a gap since I treated myself to the next in the series – partly because my young grandson is busy reading books all about footballers instead of dragons these days. But those of you who have visited before, know of my love for these fabulous books – see my review of How To Twist a Dragon’s Tale here.

Viking Berk heir, Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III and his dragon, Toothless are target of dragon rebellion — filled with the meanest Razor-wings, Tonguetwisters, and Vampire Ghouldeaths. Only a King can save them, a champion with all of the King’s Lost Things. Hiccup will have to outwit a witch, fight his arch-enemy, and beat back an army of bloodthirsty dragons with just one sword.

There is still a madcap quality about some of the adventures besetting Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III, but also a certain melancholy, given that the tales of derring-do are being told by a much older and sadder Hiccup rather than the skinny, desperate boy struggling to stay alive against mountainous odds. That doesn’t stop the characters from pinging off the page and this story – like all the others – take off in all sorts of unexpected directions. Though there is a dreadful inevitability about the terrible war between humans and dragons that seems to be on the brink of breaking out.

It was still fun to read about the crafty witch Excellinor and her wicked plans to overthrow the Vikings and have her son crowned as King of the Wilderwest – and Hiccup’s attempts to prevent her from doing so. As well as satisfyingly wicked antagonists, Hiccup is also hampered by a lantern-jawed hero in the shape of Flashburn, the greatest swordsman of his time. And while Fishlegs, his asthmatic friend, is mostly loyal, he isn’t all that much use in a fight, while his other staunch companion, Camicazi, is an adrenaline junkie incapable of keeping a secret.

Cowell’s plotting is brilliant at keeping the pace up, so that restless small boys who would rather be kicking a football around instead of sitting still and listening to a story, nonetheless pay attention, because said story is THAT good. So if you have any small boys or girls in your life who are in need of a gripping series, then this is the one for you. If they’ve wandered off to play football, then this is still the one for you – because once you’ve started reading this one, you won’t want to put it down until you’ve discovered what happens to the likes of Toothless, Hiccup, Fishlegs and Excellinor.
10/10

Friday Faceoff – Ho, ho, ho! Brainfluffbookblog

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This meme was started by Books by Proxy, whose fabulous idea was to compare UK and US book covers and decide which is we prefer. This meme is currently being nurtured by Lynn’s Book Blog and the subject this week featuring on any of our covers is CHRISTMAS, so I’ve selected Hogfather – Book 20 of the Discworld series by the irreplaceable Terry Pratchett. The first time I read this book, I was crying with laughter over the scene in the toy department…

This version was released in October 2002 by Corgi and I get the impression that the cover designer was told that this book featured Death stepping into the role of the Hogfather. He chose to focus on the Death part… All this gloom and blackness gives this cover a sense of horror – and it’s nothing of the sort. While the story is violent in places and features the most psychotic killer Pratchett ever depicts, there is also plenty of mayhem and lots of humour, too. Not that you’d know it from this cover, which I HATE.

 

Published in October 2002, also by Corgi, this cover is a huge improvement – mostly because it’s based on the original. In my opinion, it’s even better, because those big, intrusive text boxes are no longer a feature and we get the full benefit of the fabulous artwork. This one is my favourite.

 

This edition, published by Corgi in June 2013, is another winner – though I’m intrigued to see this one was released in the middle of summer, for some reason… Rightly featuring the pigs, it once more packs a punch with that lovely dark sky in the background and nicely stippled author font. Again, this one is based on the original cover for the book and so the riotous aspect of the story is reflected in the artwork. This one is also my favourite. And no… don’t ask me to choose between the two, because I can’t.

 

Produced by Harper in September 1999, this one is just boring. While a picture of the Hogfather features on the cover and the title font is pleasingly quirky, that doesn’t really make up for the oh-so plain yellow cover. And no – I personally don’t think the line of scythes is a suitable replacement for the iconic bright, colourful covers that always remind me of Pratchett’s Discworld series.

 

This French edition, published by Pocket is the only original cover that comes close to the humorous mayhem that represents the series. I love the way Death emerges from the chimney, with the children looking on in fascination. Susan is beautifully portrayed and I love the orange glow that suffuses this cover – so appropriate for the time of year. If I didn’t have such fond memories of the previous covers, which I’m sure is affecting my choices, this one would have been a real contender. Which one is your favourite?

Review of hardback book The Death Chamber – Book 6 of The Detective’s Daughter series by Lesley Thomson #Brainfluffbookreview #TheDeathChamberbookreview

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Anyone who has been on this blog for any length of time knows that this is one of my favourite authors as I find her detailed worldbuilding, steady accumulation of clues and layered, complex characterisation adds up to a thoroughly satisfying read. See my review of her first book in this series, The Detective’s Daughter. I had acquired this copy at a book signing and reading and then put it down in the kitchen, where it promptly got buried under a pile of other books. I was delighted when I unearthed it…

Queen’s Jubilee, 1977: Cassie Baker sees her boyfriend kissing another girl at the village disco. Upset, she heads home alone and is never seen again.
Millennium Eve, 1999: DCI Paul Mercer finds Cassie’s remains in a field. Now he must prove the man who led him there is guilty.

When Mercer’s daughter asks Stella Darnell for help solving the murder, Stella see echoes of herself. Another detective’s daughter. With her sidekick sleuth, Jack, Stella moves to Winchcombe, where DCI Mercer and his prime suspect have been playing cat and mouse for the past eighteen years…

Stella Darnell’s father was a detective married to the job – and Stella bears the scars. She set up and now runs her own very successful cleaning company, but is increasingly drawn to the drama and tension surrounding the business of solving cold-case murders. Jack, her partner in these investigations also has a fascinating backstory, which I won’t be revealing here as it wanders into spoiler territory. Each of them is a loner, and I enjoyed the increasing tension as they now both feel uncomfortable keeping secrets from each other to an extent that occasionally trips into humour. Lucie Mae, local journalist and long-running character, also crashes into this investigation and brings along her budgie.

Thomson manages to evoke the countryside very well from the viewpoint of two confirmed Londoners as they rent a ramshackle cottage while investigating the crime. Her vivid worldbuilding is her superpower, as we get the sound and feel of Winchcombe and the sense of a tight-knit community, who nevertheless enjoy the chance to talk about the murdered girl, especially as her convicted killer is due to be released on parole. Though a fair few people don’t believe he committed the crime.

I found it difficult to put this one down as Jack and Stella steadily gather evidence and red herrings, while someone is also trying to persuade them to walk away. As ever, I didn’t guess who the murderer was until I was supposed to – and this time in particular, there is a development near the end that means Jack’s life is about to change forever. The thing I find with Thomson’s books, is that once I’ve finished reading one, the characters and situation goes on living in my head. And no… that isn’t usual for me. Normally once I’ve put a book down and written the review, I usually move onto the next book and rarely recall it. But Stella and Jack have wriggled into my inscape and rearranged my mental furniture. Highly recommended for fans of intelligent, murder mysteries set in a vivid contemporary setting.
10/10

More SFF Goodness in the Runup to Christmas… Christmas-Holiday Gifts – Science Fiction & Fantasy for Everyone

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My novel Running Out of Space is currently on offer in a giveaway organised by Midwest Journal Press running up to Christmas and so I thought I’d feature a few of the other offerings for you that have caught my eye. I haven’t read any of these yet, but liked the covers and the sound of them.

Arkship Countdown – Prologue to The Arkship Saga by Niel Bushnell
“Dune meets Battlestar Galactica, with a pinch of Asimov thrown in for good measure.”
Earth has been destroyed, the entire solar system turned to dust by a cataclysmic event known as the Fracture. Now, the last survivors of humanity live on vast arkships drifting through the Cluster, doing what they can to survive in a hostile ever-changing environment.

Life on board the Ark Royal Obsidian is a quiet routine for Chief of the engine deck, Bran Colmen. That is until his family is kidnapped and he is forced to steal secrets about the vast arkship’s engines by a covert intruder. As time runs out, Colmen finds himself trapped between saving his family and averting a war that could kill thousands.

Arkship Countdown is the prologue for the epic new series from British author Niel Bushnell.

 

 

Ghenna Dawn – Book 1 of the Portal Wars series by Jay Allan
Erastus. An unimaginable nightmare. A searing hot world, covered with cracked, burning deserts and sweltering jungles. A hostile planet far from Earth, it was the most hellish place men have ever tried to survive. Called Gehenna by the condemned men sent to fight there, it forged the few who survived its murderous battles into the strongest soldiers in history.

Jake Taylor was a New Hampshire farmboy who wanted nothing more than to marry his girlfriend, work on the farm, and maybe one day write a great novel. But mankind was fighting the alien Tegeri and their bio-mechanical cyborg soldiers, and UN Central needed men…men to go to war on hostile worlds like Erastus.

 

 

 

 

Alien Hunters – Book 1 of the Alien Hunters series by Daniel Arenson
The skelkrins. Predators from deep space. Creatures of claws, fangs, and unending malice. They swarm across the galaxy, slaying all in their path. Planets burn in their wake. And now they’re heading to Earth. Raphael “Riff” Starfire commands the Alien Hunters, a group of scruffy mercenaries. Galactic pest controllers, they mostly handle small critters–aliens that clog up your engine pipes, gnaw on your hull, or burrow through your silos. Riff and his crew have never faced anything like the skelkrins before. As these cosmic killers invade our solar system, will Riff be the one hunting aliens . . . or will aliens hunt him?

 

 

 

Planet Emergency by Christian Bæk Hedegaard
Thе соmbinеd bоmbаrdmеnt causes аll сrеаturеѕ on the Earth to ѕwар mindѕ, leaving реорlе in аnimаlѕ, animals in реорlе, men in women аnd сhildrеn in adults. Thе nightmаrе which follows bесоmеѕ a ѕосiаl аnd есоnоmiс саtаѕtrорhе.

Teaser Tuesday – 18th December, 2018 #Brainfluffbookblog #TeaserTuesday

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Teaser Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by The Purple Booker.
Anyone can play along! Just do the following:
• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

This is my choice of the day:
Hurricane – Book 3 in the Hive Mind series by Janet Edwards

42% I pulled back into my own head, and opened my eyes to look out of the window. No, this was no hallucination, but shocking reality. The beach had some similarities to one of the Hive beaches, but the sight of the sea devastated me.

This sea was nothing like the ones on Hive beaches. This sea was a powerful, menacing grey, with giant waves that threw themselves at the beach in anger, and the far cliffs…

There were no far cliffs. There were no supporting pillars either. The sea stretched on unbroken into the distance, as if it reached to the end of eternity.

BLURB: Eighteen-year-old Amber is the youngest of the five telepaths who protect the hundred million citizens of one of the great hive cities of twenty-sixth century Earth. Her job is hunting down criminals before they commit their crimes, but this time a simple case leads on to something far bigger.

This is a case where Amber’s team have to face the unknown and break all the rules they usually follow, while Amber has extra burdens she can’t share with anyone. She has a personal mystery to solve, and questions she wants answered, but curiosity is a dangerous trait in a telepath.

I really enjoy Janet Edwards’ writing – see my review of the first book in the series Telepath. This near-future world has most of the population living in close quarters underground and once again, I’m enjoying the adventures of this likeable protagonist. She is growing up fast with the huge responsibility resting on her shoulders – and circumstances are stacking up to crisis that only she can solve – with catastrophic consequences if she doesn’t… I’m finding it hard to put this one down!