*NEW RELEASE SPECIAL* Review of NETGALLEY arc The Magic Chair Murder: a 1920s English Mystery – Book 1 of the Black and Dods Mysteries by Diane Janes

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Once again, it was the cover that attracted me to this offering, along with the emphasis on it being a 1920s murder mystery. I really like that era, being a fan of Agatha Christie and an even bigger fan of Dorothy L. Sayers, so I hoped that Janes would prove to be an entertaining read.

1929. The night before she’s due to make a speech to the Robert Barnaby Society on the subject of the famous writer’s ‘magic chair’, committee member Linda Dexter disappears. When her body is discovered two days later, fellow members Frances Black and Tom Dod determine to find out the truth about her death.

This is the very simple premise that sets up the story, where a guest speaker inexplicably disappears during a conference and when her body is later discovered, it is assumed she has committed suicide. Both Frances Black and Tom Dod don’t believe this is the case and are determined to get to the bottom of why Linda is murdered.

I loved this one – Janes has taken care to set up the story and establish the characters in much the same way as Christie did. There is also no shortage of likely candidates when it comes to working out who the murderer is. As the investigation proceeds, we also learn more about Frances and Tom – and why the pair of them might be very willing to spend time and energy worrying about a problem that has nothing to do with their own daily routines. Despite this story consciously harking back to the past, there is no sentimentality in Janes’s depiction of the 1920s. The shadow of the Great War is still lying heavily across the country and although women have been granted the vote during the previous year, the manner in which Frances is frequently dismissed makes me very glad that I wasn’t born in that era.

I was also impressed with the worldbuilding and the level of historical detail throughout – at no time did any of it jar. What you don’t get with this book is foot to-the-floor action as the story builds steadily while Frances and Tom discover yet more facts and clues surrounding Linda’s life. Nonetheless I was immersed in the world and wanting to know exactly why Linda was murdered and who did it.

One of the pleasures in reading this type of crime novel is trying to guess the culprit and while I won’t claim to be particularly good at it, I can report that I didn’t guess whodunit, yet the murder and why it was committed made complete sense. I came to really like Frances and I’m going to be looking out for more books in this series – luckily it seems that Diane Janes is a prolific author. Yippee! While I obtained an arc of The Magic Chair Murder from Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own.
9/10

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16 responses »

    • I loved it, too! I think you’re right about the period – but I felt there was a lot going on in this book that was consciously echoing the mysteries of the time, especially the high number of suspects. It was very well done:).

  1. I’m so glad this turned out to be such a great read for you. I was drawn to the cover and the 20’s setting when you first shared it and was hoping you would report back and say that it was good. I’ll be adding it to my reading list now. Wonderful review!

  2. Oh this sounds wonderful! I’ve been looking for your review since you first mentioned it as this definitely looks like my kind of book and I’m definitely excited to try it! I’m a huge Agatha Christie fan though less so on Dorothy Sayers but that’s mostly because I haven’t read enough of her.

    • I think this would definitely be your kind of book, Katherine:) I do hope you manage to get hold of it – I’d love to know what you think about it.

  3. Even though I haven’t read any in the recent years, I do have a soft spot for murder mysteries (mostly because of a brilliant Polish murder mystery writer I used to read as a teen), so I read your review with pleasure. Thank you, Sarah!

    • This is an outstanding cosy mystery – I clearly recall the story and characters and loved how she depicts the period as quite grim and difficult to live through – especially for women.

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