Daily Archives: August 27, 2015

Review of The Shepherd’s Crown – the final Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett

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We have always pre-ordered the latest Terry Pratchett novel since… forever. Pratchett’s world have developed and expanded through most of my adult life and while I love some more than others, I’ve never disliked any of them. And now, I have just finished The Shepherd’s Crown with a real sense of sadness. For Pratchett hadn’t finished saying what he had to say – and there is a sense of pent frustration and energy throughout this last Tiffany Aching adventure which he completed during the final year of his life.

theshepherdscrownDeep in the Chalk, something is stirring. The owls and the foxes can sense it, and Tiffany Aching feels it in her boots. An old enemy is gathering strength. This is a time of endings and beginnings, old friends and a new, a blurring of the edges and a shifting of power. Now Tiffany stands between the light and the dark, the good and the bad. As the fairy horde prepares for invasion, Tiffany must summon all the witches to stand with her. To protect the land. Her land. There will be a reckoning…

I’ve always enjoyed the Tiffany Aching books, set on the chalk uplands – a landscape I know and love. And the bonus is there are a hatful of my favourite characters who make an appearance in this delightful, moving addition to the canon. Nanny Ogg, Granny Weatherwax, Miss Tick, Magrat all feature, along with a couple of Tiffany’s former adversaries, Miss Earwig and the terrifying Queen of the Elves. And of course the Nac Mac Feegles, the tiny, blue-skinned warriors who shadow Tiffany and guard her wherever she goes. Even in places she’d rather they didn’t…

The emotional scene near the beginning had me on the edge of tears. And in other parts of the book, I was laughing out loud – there are only a handful of books that have elicited that response from me. While I was looking forward to reading this one, I wasn’t expecting it to pack such a punch. But the story sings off the page as classic Pratchett at his best.

Tiffany is suddenly pitchforked into a role of major responsibility. A role where she is challenged and not only by those who don’t wish her well. But in addition to the threat from Fairyland, there is also the constant pressure to be the very best witch she can be in a world that is suddenly changing. A world where goblins are no longer smelly nuisances, but valued engineers, a world where railways and claques have shrunk distances. A world where a young man named Geoffrey, accompanied by his goat Mephistopheles, turns up requesting to be trained as a witch.

The story trips along at a good clip, providing all the unique Pratchett touches his fans know and love, including the whacky footnotes and the formerly obnoxious character that reveals a nicer side to her nature – a feat Pratchett regularly pulled off throughout this long-running series. And the ending provides plenty of action and excitement with a thoroughly enjoyable, wholly satisfying conclusion. Is this a detached, unbiased review? Probably not. I am discussing the last, the very last Discworld novel, ever. The series that has given me more pleasure over the years than any other.

Wherever you are, Mr Pratchett, thank you for this last gem. The magic persists…
10/10

POEM – The Creep’s Carriage

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This poem was written after the discussion about bringing in women’s carriages on trains, due to the rise in reported incidents against women. Then someone suggested a creep’s carriage – and this poem kept running around my head this morning while I was trying to edit. So I let it loose…

They say women should be herded into
separate carriages for their own good.
To keep them safe from the slimy creeps who
won’t leave them alone to travel in peace.

Why don’t we pen up the vile creeps instead?
Give them vomit-curry coloured tickets
showing their creep-class status, to be led
by guards straight to the creep’s carriage.

Who will qualify to travel creep-class?
If you’ve ever groped, stroked or touched, then in
you go. Let’s ditch words like bother or harass –
if you’ve unzipped your fly to have a wank,
you’ve applied for creep-class. Shouted ‘fuck!’
loudly, watching the old bag’s face as she shrank
into her seat, while grinning with your mates –
you’ve complied with creep-class T’s and C’s.
Rating a girl’s tits or her face, demanding dates,
taking pics and posting them online – I’m pleased
to say you have fulfilled the terms that rates
you as entitled to travel creep-class.

Have a journey full of fear and heartache.